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1 - 10 of 50 results for: POLISCI ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

POLISCI 1: The Science of Politics

Why do countries go to war? How can we explain problems such as poverty, inequality, and pollution? What can be done to improve political representation in the United States and other countries? We will use scientific methods to answer these and other fundamental questions about politics.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

This course introduces students to the systematic study of international politics with a focus on causes and consequences of international conflict and cooperation. The course examines questions falling in five major areas: the structure of international politics and state system, patterns and causes of war and peace, the differences in the foreign policies of democracies and non-democracies, challenges to international cooperation and how they may be overcome, and the implications of economic growth for great power politics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 102: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: Democracy Under Siege? (AMSTUD 123X, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

This course both looks at the ways American political institutions shape policy outcomes and how Federal, state and local government have handled challenges related to increasing party polarization, climate change, heightened racial tensions and rising economic inequality. Instruction will include lectures, guest speakers, and moderated discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 103: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C)

Justice, as we use the term in this class, is a question about social cooperation. People can produce much more cooperatively than the sum of what they could produce as individuals, and these gains from cooperation are what makes civilization possible. But on what terms should we cooperate? How should we divide, as the philosopher John Rawls puts it, "the benefits and burdens of social cooperation"? Working primarily within the Anglo-American philosophical tradition, we'll discuss different answers to this big question as a way to bring together some of the most prominent debates in modern political philosophy. We'll study theories including utilitarianism, libertarianism, classical liberalism, and egalitarian liberalism, and we'll take on complex current issues like reparations for racial injustice, the gender pay gap, and responses to climate change. This class is meant to be an accessible entry point to political philosophy. No experience with political science or philosophy is required or assumed, and we will spend time on the strategy of philosophy as well: understanding how our authors make their arguments to better respond to them and make our own.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

POLISCI 114D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTLPOL 230, INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 314D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 118P: U.S. Relations with Iran

The evolution of relations between the U.S. and Iran. The years after WW II when the U.S. became more involved in Iran. Relations after the victory of the Islamic republic. The current state of affairs and the prospects for the future. Emphasis is on original documents of U.S. diplomacy (White House, State Department, and the U.S. Embassy in Iran). Research paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci

POLISCI 150A: Data Science for Politics (POLISCI 355A)

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

POLISCI 209: Curricular Practical Training

Qualified Political Science students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. The student is responsible for arranging their own internship/employment and gaining faculty sponsorship. Prior to enrolling, students must complete a petition form available on the Political Science website ( politicalscience.stanford.edu/undergraduate-program/forms). The petition is due no later the end of week one of the quarter in which the student intends to enroll. If the CPT is for Summer, the petition form is due by May 31. An offer letter will need to be submitted along with the petition. At the completion of the CPT quarter, a final report must be submitted to the faculty sponsor documenting the work done and its relevance to Political Science. This course be repeated for credit up to 3 times but will not count toward the Political Science major or minor requirements.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

POLISCI 218T: Politics of Insurgency, Terrorism and Civil War

This seminar introduces students the politics of internal conflict and violence, which is the dominant form of political conflict in the contemporary world. We will examine dynamics of internal conflict onset, intra-conflict period, and processes by which internal conflict may come to an end. We will also study strategies of international intervention, politics of non-state armed groups, as well as the peculiar terrorism and counterterrorism challenges faces by the US government in parts of Africa, Middle East, and South Asia. The course will introduce these topics through cutting edge scholarship. Note that the course has a major reading load and requires substantial participation in seminar discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Mir, A. (PI)

POLISCI 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (AMSTUD 118X, CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students t more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) and Winter (Y) courses are focused on basic and advanced skills, respectively, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Spring (Z) practicum quarter, which engages teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X and Y are composed of four weekly pedagogical components: (A) lectures; (B) writing prompts linked with small group discussion; (C) lab and self-guided tutorials on the R programming language; and (D) R data analysis assignments. Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu/education.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
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