2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 41 results for: PHIL ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHIL 2: Introduction to Moral Philosophy (ETHICSOC 20)

What should I do with my life? What kind of person should I be? How should we treat others? What makes actions right or wrong? What is good and what is bad? What should we value? How should we organize society? Is there any reason to be moral? Is morality relative or subjective? How, if at all, can such questions be answered? Intensive introduction to theories and techniques in contemporary moral philosophy.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, GER:EC-EthicReas, GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 24P: The Moral and Political Philosophy of Luck

This class explores issues in ethics and political philosophy that centrally involve luck. We will cover a diverse range of topics, including moral luck, egalitarianism, meritocracy, rewards for talents and punishments for disabilities, risk-taking, risk-sharing, penalties for crimes, and the use of lotteries in distributing social goods. Most of the readings will be relatively recent work that has far-reaching implications for the market economy, the criminal and tort law systems, social welfare programs, and the moral practice of praising and blaming.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

PHIL 49: Survey of Formal Methods

Survey of important formal methods used in philosophy. The course covers the basics of propositional and elementary predicate logic, probability and decision theory, game theory, and statistics, highlighting philosophical issues and applications. Specific topics include the languages of propositional and predicate logic and their interpretations, rationality arguments for the probability axioms, Nash equilibrium and dominance reasoning, and the meaning of statistical significance tests. Assessment is through a combination of problems designed to solidify competence with the mathematical tools and short-answer questions designed to test conceptual understanding.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, GER:DB-Math

PHIL 60: Introduction to Philosophy of Science (HPS 60)

This course introduces students to tools for the philosophical analysis of science. We will cover issues in observation, experiment, and reasoning, questions about the aims of science, scientific change, and the relations between science and values.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum

PHIL 74A: Ethics in a Human Life (ETHICSOC 174, HUMBIO 174A)

Ethical questions pervade a human life from before a person is conceived until after she dies, and at every point in between. This course raises a series of ethical questions, following along the path of a person's life - questions that arise before, during, and after she lives it. We will explore distinctive questions that a life presents at each of several familiar stages: prior to birth, childhood, adulthood, death, and even beyond. We will consider how some philosophers have tried to answer these questions, and we will think about how answering them might help us form a better understanding of the ethical shape of a human life as a whole.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER

PHIL 80: Mind, Matter, and Meaning

We'll cover three central topics in philosophy: personal identity; the metaphysics of mind; and the nature of belief. Readings will be drawn both from philosophy and from cognitive science more broadly. This is an intensive writing course that satisfies the writing in the major requirement for both Philosophy and Symbolic Systems. Students will submit five papers over the course of the quarter, and receive constructive feedback on each. Prerequisite: at least one other philosophy course, not including SYMSYS 1 / PHIL 99.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 81: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 99: Minds and Machines (CS 24, LINGUIST 35, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Students must take this course before being approved to declare Symbolic Systems as a major. All students interested in studying Symbolic Systems are urged to take this course early in their student careers. The course material and presentation will be at an introductory level, without prerequisites. If you have any questions about the course, please email symsys1staff@gmail.com.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, GER:DB-SocSci

PHIL 100: The History of Ancient Greek Philosophy (CLASSICS 40)

We shall cover the major developments in Greek philosophical thought, focusing on Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic schools (the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics). Topics include epistemology, metaphysics, psychology, ethics and political theory. No prereqs, not repeatable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum

PHIL 117P: Aristotle, On Coming-to-be and Passing-away (PHIL 217P)

In this course, we will explore Aristotle's De Generatione et Corruptione, known in English as either On Generation and Corruption or On Coming-to-be and Passing-away. In the work, Aristotle confronts issues of change, particularly of substantial change and qualitative change, as he articulates his theory of elements: what are the philosophical demands and constraints upon the stuff(s) that are taken to be basic, what is the nature of these basic stuffs, and how do they serve to form the universe? These considerations have considerable relevance and interest for his broader physics, metaphysics, and ontology, as well as for his cosmology and biology. We will also consider how in the work Aristotle both presents himself as and actually operates as reacting to the significant body of theorizing on the topic by his predecessors (Plato and the Presocratics).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Pinto, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints