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1 - 10 of 13 results for: OSPKYOTO ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

OSPKYOTO 2K: First-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Second Quarter

Continuation of JAPANLNG 1. First-year sequence enables students to converse, write, and read essays on topics such as personal history, experiences, familiar people. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 1 if taken 2012-13 of later ( JAPANLNG 7 if taken 2011-12 or earlier)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

OSPKYOTO 5B: News Shaping Japan Today

Examine a wide range of topical themes affecting Japan and its society through selected stories from news media as these stories emerge. As such, this course is entirely reactive to national events as they unfold. Students have a significant amount of choice of topics they address, as they are able to select stories that interest them from a list of news articles, which changes each week.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Hugh, M. (PI)

OSPKYOTO 19: Zazen: A Practicum in Zen Meditation

Zen teaching through practice and experience. Condensed practicum course where students receive zazen training and experience monastic life in Myoshinji, the largest Zen complex in Japan, under the guidance of Rev. Daiko Matsuyama, Deputy Head Priest of Taizo-in temple. Over one week, regular early morning zazen training sessions on site in Taizo-in temple plus visit to World Cultural Heritage site Ryoanji with a private viewing and workshop. Other aspects of monastic life such as temple cleaning, and learning how to rake and care for the dry gardens at Taizo-in. Course culminates in an overnight zazen training session in Myoshinji's magnificent Hatto Dharma Hall. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1

OSPKYOTO 21K: Second-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, First Quarter

(Formerly OSPKYOTO 17K.) Goal is to further develop and enhance spoken and written Japanese in order to handle advanced concepts such as comparison and contrast of the two cultures, descriptions of incidents, and social issues. 800 kanji, 1,400 new words, and higher-level grammatical constructions. Readings include authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and essays. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 3 if taken 2012-13 or later ( JAPANLNG 7 if taken 2011-12 or earlier)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language

OSPKYOTO 25: Japan and China in the Early Modern World

Japan and China during their transition to modernity, in the context of successive waves of interaction and globalization. By the 16th century, when Europeans reached East Asia, China's Ming Dynasty and Japan's Muromachi Shogunate ruled over two of the most populous, urbanized, and sophisticated societies in the world¿with China the superior regional power. In the late 19th century, that longstanding status quo was abruptly upended. European and American steamships dominated the Pacific, China was in the throes of social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its modernization and march to empire.nUsing short primary sources (fiction, memoirs, and historical documents) and field trips, we will study the dynamics of Japanese and Chinese societies, highlighting connections and contrasts, as well as the impact that each has had on the other. How did Sino-Japanese relations in the early modern era lay the foundations for the current fraught relationship between these two East Asian po more »
Japan and China during their transition to modernity, in the context of successive waves of interaction and globalization. By the 16th century, when Europeans reached East Asia, China's Ming Dynasty and Japan's Muromachi Shogunate ruled over two of the most populous, urbanized, and sophisticated societies in the world¿with China the superior regional power. In the late 19th century, that longstanding status quo was abruptly upended. European and American steamships dominated the Pacific, China was in the throes of social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its modernization and march to empire.nUsing short primary sources (fiction, memoirs, and historical documents) and field trips, we will study the dynamics of Japanese and Chinese societies, highlighting connections and contrasts, as well as the impact that each has had on the other. How did Sino-Japanese relations in the early modern era lay the foundations for the current fraught relationship between these two East Asian powers?nConfucianism, and the Chinese model of statecraft, which can be seen in the temples and other historical sites of Kyoto, as well as in the layout of the city (modeled on the Tang capital of Chang'an). By the 16th century, when European merchants and missionaries first reached East Asia, the Ming Empire and the Muromachi Shogunate comprised two of the most populous, urbanized, economically advanced, and culturally sophisticated societies in the world-with China clearly the superior regional power. By the early twentieth century, that status quo had been turned on its head. European and American steamships now dominated the Pacific, China was in the throes of social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its modernization and march to empire. Japan's defeat of China in 1895 marked its debut as a major power; soon Japan would seize Korea and begin encroaching on China's Manchurian territories. nUsing textual sources (fiction, memoirs, and historical documents in English translation), as well as field trips to nhistorical sites and museums, we will study the historical dynamics of Japanese and Chinese societies during these centuries, highlighting their connections and contrasts, as well as the profound impact that each has had on the other. How did Sino-Japanese relations in the early modern era lay the foundations for the current fraught relationship between these two East Asian powers?
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5

OSPKYOTO 39: Capturing Concepts: A Photographic Exploration of the Origins of Kanji

Under guidance of official photographer for KYOTOGRAPHIE International Photography Festival, photograph scenes from everyday life in Kyoto to portray contemporary versions of the ancient forms and original meanings of ten different kanji. Develop observational, interpretive and creative abilities as well as improve technical skills (including picture composition and image editing). Enrollment limited.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

OSPKYOTO 41: Queer Culture and Life in Japan

Exploration of queer lives and cultural practices in Japan through diverse materials from film, literature, theater, art, as well as newspapers and personal testimonies. What it means to be queer in Japan and how it might signify differently from a US context. Looking at each text, examine how gender norms and sexual politics intersect and operate in Japanese society.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPKYOTO 58: A Journey into the Buddhist Visual Arts of Japan

Impact of Buddhism on the arts and culture of Japan as seen in the ancient capital of Kyoto. Image production, iconography, representational strategies, as well as the ritual and visual functions of Buddhist sculpture and painting with a focus on selected historical temples and their icons. Also examination of architectural and landscape elements of temple layouts, within which iconographic programs are framed, images are enlivened, and practices centered on these devotional and ritual art.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Ludvik, C. (PI)

OSPKYOTO 69: Feeling in Japan: Culture, Emotion, and Brain

How does culture shape our feelings? This course will examine emotions from a cross cultural perspective and has three course objectives: (1) to increase students' awareness of how cultural ideas and practices shape their emotions by comparing their experiences in Kyoto with those in the U.S., (2) to teach students to apply a scientific understanding of culture and emotion to their experiences in Kyoto, and (3) to teach students how to formulate and test hypotheses about emotions in Japan vs. U.S. The proposed course will be comprised of three sections. The first section will focus on dominant theories of culture and emotions and the ways in which they are scientifically measured using a variety of self-report, behavioral, and physiological/neural measures. The second section will cover three patterns that emerge from the scientific literature regarding U.S.-East Asian differences in the focus of emotion, views of emotional expression, and values regarding emotional experience. Because more »
How does culture shape our feelings? This course will examine emotions from a cross cultural perspective and has three course objectives: (1) to increase students' awareness of how cultural ideas and practices shape their emotions by comparing their experiences in Kyoto with those in the U.S., (2) to teach students to apply a scientific understanding of culture and emotion to their experiences in Kyoto, and (3) to teach students how to formulate and test hypotheses about emotions in Japan vs. U.S. The proposed course will be comprised of three sections. The first section will focus on dominant theories of culture and emotions and the ways in which they are scientifically measured using a variety of self-report, behavioral, and physiological/neural measures. The second section will cover three patterns that emerge from the scientific literature regarding U.S.-East Asian differences in the focus of emotion, views of emotional expression, and values regarding emotional experience. Because much of the literature on culture and emotion focuses on U.S. and Japanese comparisons, the empirical findings will be directly applicable to the students studying at Kyoto. The third section will focus on the role of culture and emotion in applied settings (work, educational, and clinical) in the US and Japan. Students' structured and unstructured experiences and observations living in Kyoto will be the basis of our class discussions and will be linked to course material. For instance, students may be asked to analyze the themes and narratives of popular Japanese anime, art, and architecture based on methods introduced in class. As a comparison, students will identify products and practices in the U.S. that illustrate similarities and differences between the two cultures. Students will write short papers each week linking their experiences to the assigned material. At the end of the quarter, students will make short presentations about another aspect of emotion they hypothesize varies in the U.S. and Japan, based on their own experiences in Kyoto, and discuss how they might design a study to test their hypotheses. Readings will include sections from popular books and accessible academic chapters and empirical articles.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

OSPKYOTO 101K: Third-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, First Quarter

Goal is to express thoughts and opinions in paragraph length in spoken and written forms. Materials include current Japanese media and literature for native speakers of Japanese. Cultural and social topics related to Japan and its people. Prerequisite: Placement Tests, JAPANLNG 23. See http://japanese.stanford.edu/?page_id=39.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
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