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1 - 10 of 33 results for: MATSCI ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

MATSCI 10: Materials Matter

All facets of engineering rely on materials to develop modern devices and solve the greatest technological challenges in society today. In this introductory 1-unit course, students will learn about the field of Materials Science and Engineering and its broad applications in research and industry. Students who are interested in careers in energy and sustainability, biomaterials and regenerative medicine, or consumer electronics and nanotechnology will be able to have an early window into the work done in these areas through this course. Each week, students will listen to talks from invited guest speakers and discover the wide variety of career opportunities and areas of focus offered through Materials Science and Engineering. Students will also be invited to attend optional events including panel discussions and laboratory tours, campus conditions permitting. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to develop networks with Stanford alumni and current students in our department. This course is open to all undergraduates and does not have any pre-requisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MATSCI 31: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (CHEM 31M)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and more »
A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions will include the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials with the same composition (for example: diamond, graphite, graphene). There will be three lectures and one two-hour laboratory session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, gas laws, and thermochemistry. All students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the Autumn 2021 General Chemistry Placement Test before the Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background. Same as: MATSCI 31
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 83N: Great Inventions That Matter

This introductory seminar starts by illuminating on the general aspects of creativity, invention, and patenting in engineering and medicine, and how Stanford University is one of the world's foremost engines of innovation. We then take a deep dive into some great technological inventions which are still playing an essential role in our everyday lives, such as fiber amplifier, digital compass, computer memory, HIV detector, personal genome machine, cancer cell sorting, brain imaging, and mind reading. The stories and underlying materials and technologies behind each invention, including a few examples by Stanford faculty and student inventors, are highlighted and discussed. A special lecture focuses on the public policy on intellectual properties (IP) and the resources at Stanford Office of Technology Licensing (OTL). Each student will have an opportunity to present on a great invention from Stanford (or elsewhere), or to write a (mock) patent disclosure of his/her own ideas.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

MATSCI 86N: Metalheads of Modern Science

This seminar will explore where we find metals in science and technology today. Starting with the blacksmiths and metallurgists of ancient history, we will introduce the scientific innovations that have enabled today's technology. We will then explore how today's technology uses metals in new and innovative ways - far beyond the metallurgy of old. Students will learn how metals in their bodies can be used for diagnostics and treatments, how metals in geology can show us how planets form, how new metallic tools allow us to 3D print aircraft engines, and more! This will introduce students to the science of metals and explore the career paths that can follow from these technologies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MATSCI 100: Undergraduate Independent Study

Independent study in materials science under supervision of a faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

MATSCI 145: Kinetics of Materials Synthesis

The science of synthesis of nanometer scale materials. Examples including solution phase synthesis of nanoparticles, the vapor-liquid-solid approach to growing nanowires, formation of mesoporous materials from block-copolymer solutions, and formation of photonic crystals. Relationship of the synthesis phenomena to the materials science driving forces and kinetic mechanisms. Materials science concepts including capillarity, Gibbs free energy, phase diagrams, and driving forces. Prerequisites: MatSci 144. (Formerly 155)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Clemens, B. (PI)

MATSCI 150: Undergraduate Research

Participation in a research project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit

MATSCI 151: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (MATSCI 251)

Primarily for students without a materials background. Mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructure in a range of engineering materials. Elementary deformation and fracture concepts, strengthening and toughening strategies in metals and ceramics. Topics: dislocation theory, mechanisms of hardening and toughening, fracture, fatigue, and high-temperature creep. Undergraduates register in 151 for 4 units; graduates register for 251 in 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 160: Nanomaterials Laboratory (MATSCI 170)

This course is designed for students interested in exploring the cutting edge of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Students will learn several fundamental concepts related to nanomaterials synthesis and characterization that are commonly used in research and industrial settings. Students will also investigate several applications of nanomaterials through a series of assessments, including self-assembled monolayers, nanowire photovoltaics, and nanoparticles for drug delivery and biomarker screening. In lieu of traditional labs, students will attend weekly discussion sections aimed at priming students to think like a materials engineer. Through these discussions, students will explore how to design an effective experiment, how to identify research gaps, and how to write a compelling grant proposal. This course satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement. Enrollment limited to 24. Prerequisites: ENGR 50. Contact instructor for more details. Undergraduates register for 160 for 4 units, Graduates register for 170 for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Kumar, R. (PI)
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