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1 - 10 of 33 results for: LINGUIST ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

This introductory-level course is targeted to students with no linguistics background.  The course is designed to introduce and provide an overview of methods, findings, and problems in eight main areas of linguistics: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, Psycholinguistics, and Sociolinguistics. Through lectures, in-class activities, and problem sets, you will come away with an overview of various linguistic phenomena, a sense of the diversity across languages, skills of linguistic analysis, an awareness of connections between these linguistics and applications of linguistics more broadly, and a basis for understanding the systematic, but complex nature of human language.  While much of the course uses English to illuminate various points, you will be exposed to and learn to analyze languages other than English.  By the end of the course, you should be able to explain similarities and differences of human languages, use basic linguistic terminology appropriately, apply the tools of linguistic analysis to problems and puzzles of linguistics, understand the questions that drive much research in linguistics, and explain how understanding linguistics is relevant for a variety of real-world phenomena.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 35: Minds and Machines (CS 24, PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Students must take this course before being approved to declare Symbolic Systems as a major. All students interested in studying Symbolic Systems are urged to take this course early in their student careers. The course material and presentation will be at an introductory level, without prerequisites. If you have any questions about the course, please email symsys1staff@gmail.com.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 107: Phonetic Transcription

This course will introduce you to the International Phonetic Alphabet, which we will use to transcribe and understand sound patterns across a diverse set of languages. In order to effectively transcribe languages phonetically, you will also learn about the articulatory properties of each sound of the worlds languages and how to produce each sound (even those that are not native to you) in isolation and in various contexts. You will also gain practical skills in recording and labeling acoustic files in Praat (a program for acoustic analysis and other phonetic work). The final project for the class, which will take place in the final two weeks of the course, will involve applying the skills you learned towards describing and transcribing patterns of variation in a language or dialect that you do not speak.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 110: Introduction to Phonology

Introduction to the sound systems of the world's languages, their similarities and differences. Theories that account for the tacit generalizations that govern the sound patterns of languages. Prerequisite: Linguist 1, Linguist 105
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 121B: Crosslinguistic Syntax

A data-driven introduction to the study of syntax through the investigation of a diverse array of the world's languages, including but not limited to English. Emphasis is on understanding how languages are systematically alike and different in their basic sentence structure. The course focuses on building up syntactic argumentation skills via the collective development of a partial formal theory of sentence structure, which attempts to model native speaker knowledge. Satisfies the WIM requirement for Linguistics and the WAY-FR requirement. Prerequisites: none (can be taken before or after Linguistics 121A). The discussion section is mandatory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR

LINGUIST 132: Lexical Semantic Typology

This course surveys how languages express members of the basic conceptual categories entity, event, property, and spatial relation. It examines strategies languages use to name members of these categories, and factors that might influence the choices languages make. Relatedly, it explores similarities and differences among languages in the sets of words they have to express notions within various conceptual domains. Restricted to undergraduates. Prerequisites: Linguist 116A, 121A, 121B, 130A, or 130B, or permission of the instructor
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Levin, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 145: Introduction to Psycholinguistics (LINGUIST 245A, PSYCH 140)

How do people do things with language? How do we go from perceiving the acoustic waves that reach our ears to understanding that someone just announced the winner of the presidential election? How do we go from a thought to spelling that thought out in a sentence? How do babies learn language from scratch? This course is a practical introduction to psycholinguistics -- the study of how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. The course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of both the research methodologies used in psycholinguistic research and many of the well-established findings in the field. Topics covered will include visual and auditory recognition of words, sentence comprehension, reading, discourse and inference, sentence production, language acquisition, language in the brain, and language disorders. Students will conduct a small but original research project and gain experience with reporting and critiquing psycholinguistic research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LINGUIST 180: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 280)

Extracting meaning, information, and structure from human language text, speech, web pages, social networks. Introducing methods (regex, edit distance, naive Bayes, logistic regression, neural embeddings, inverted indices, collaborative filtering, PageRank), applications (chatbots, sentiment analysis, information retrieval, question answering, text classification, social networks, recommender systems), and ethical issues in both. Prerequisites: CS106B
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Jurafsky, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 196: Introduction to Research for Undergraduates

Introduction to linguistic research via presentations by Stanford linguistics faculty and graduate students. Open to undergraduate students interested in linguistics. Required for linguistics majors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Luo, Y. (PI)

LINGUIST 198: Honors Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit
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