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1 - 10 of 132 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 201: Civil Procedure I

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. This course is a study of the process of civil litigation from the commencement of a lawsuit through final judgment under modern statutes and rules of court, with emphasis on the federal rules of civil procedure. May include class participation, written assignments, or other elements. Your instructor will advise you of the basis for grading.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

LAW 205: Contracts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It provides exposure to basic contract law. The course will identify the scope and purpose of the legal protection accorded to interests predicated on contract and will focus on problems of contract formation, interpretation, performance, and remedies for breach.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

LAW 219: Legal Research and Writing

Legal Research and Writing is a two-unit course taught as a simulation. Students work on a legal problem starting with an initial interview, and they conduct fact investigation and legal research related to that problem. Students receive rigorous training in reading and analyzing legal authority, and in using persuasive strategies--legal analysis, narrative, rhetoric, legal theory, and public policy--to frame and develop legal arguments. Students write predictive memos and persuasive briefs, and are introduced to the professional norms of ethics, timeliness, and courtesy. This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 223: Torts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It considers issues involved in determining whether the law should require a person to compensate for harm intentionally or unintentionally caused. These problems arise in situations as diverse as automobile collisions, operations of nuclear facilities, and consumption of defective food products. Among other considerations, the course explores various resolutions in terms of their social, economic, and political implications.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

LAW 240D: Discussion (1L): Criminal Legal Histories

This seminar will trace the roots of four critical aspects of the American criminal justice system: jury independence and the power of jurors to render verdicts according to conscience; plea bargaining and the marginalization of juries; penitentiaries and the displacement of other forms of punishment; and the criminalization of recreational drugs. Though modern criminal justice policy will inform our conversation, the readings will be historical with an emphasis on primary source documents. We will examine the forces driving legal evolution and the historian's tools in mapping those forces. The seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. Class meets 4:15-6:15pm, September 15, September 22, October 6, October 20.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Fisher, G. (PI)

LAW 240J: Discussion (1L): Religion, Identity and Law

This seminar will focus on the dynamic interplay between religious identity, community, and worldview, and the study, practice, and profession of law. As a defining force for so many across the globe, and in the norms through which human beings recognize their rights and arrange their affairs, religion has a unique and abiding impact on the work and life of aspiring and practicing lawyers -- for believers and nonbelievers alike. Whether as first-year law students or seasoned practitioners, the need to anticipate, appreciate, and reconcile religious perspectives is both a vital professional skill and an illuminating resource for self-understanding and mutual respect. The class will meet across three on-campus sessions and a closing offsite dinner, and will include a collaborative exploration of primary and secondary sources, as well as custom conversational frameworks. Topics will include religion and cross-cultural lawyering, religion and legal systems, the role of faith in judicial de more »
This seminar will focus on the dynamic interplay between religious identity, community, and worldview, and the study, practice, and profession of law. As a defining force for so many across the globe, and in the norms through which human beings recognize their rights and arrange their affairs, religion has a unique and abiding impact on the work and life of aspiring and practicing lawyers -- for believers and nonbelievers alike. Whether as first-year law students or seasoned practitioners, the need to anticipate, appreciate, and reconcile religious perspectives is both a vital professional skill and an illuminating resource for self-understanding and mutual respect. The class will meet across three on-campus sessions and a closing offsite dinner, and will include a collaborative exploration of primary and secondary sources, as well as custom conversational frameworks. Topics will include religion and cross-cultural lawyering, religion and legal systems, the role of faith in judicial decision-making, and law as a vocation (with attendant self-care dynamics). Befitting the overarching goals of diversity and inclusion in the discussion series generally, and the central importance of particularized themes of bridge building, this seminar is warmly and equally open to students of any religious tradition and those of no religion at all. Elements used in grading: Full attendance, reading of assigned materials, and active participation. The seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. Class will meet 6:30-8:30pm, September 22, October 6, October 27, November 10
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Sonne, J. (PI)

LAW 240K: Discussion (1L): Representations of Criminal Lawyers in Popular Culture Through the Lens of Bias

This discussion group will explore the portrayal of criminal lawyers in popular films and will engage in critical analysis of how misconceptions about the criminal justice system and biases against women, people of color and the poor are amplified on the big screen. Source materials will include numerous mass-market films juxtaposed against authoritative law review and other commentary to afford in-depth discussion. Elements used in grading: Full attendance, reading of assigned materials, and active participation. The seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. Class will meet 6:00-8:00pm, September 16, September 30, October 14, October 28.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Tyler, R. (PI)

LAW 240M: Discussion (1L): The Central Park Five Case

This discussion seminar will focus on racial factors in the criminal justice system, using the Central Park 5 case and the Netflix series "When They See Us" as the jumping off point for the discussion. Following each episode of the series, the seminar will discuss the investigation, the trial, incarceration and post incarceration experiences. Although there may be some readings, the primary material will be the Netflix series. I hope to have some additional help with the discussion by asking a few outside players to join the class. Participants could include George Gascon, the recently elected progressive District Attorney in Los Angeles who has been a leader in the investigation of racism in enforcement of the laws, and our alum Emily Galvin Almanza. Co-Founder and Executive Director, Partners for Justice, Mike Romano, who leads our Three Strikes Project, and one of the Three Strikers whose release was secured by Stanford's Three Strike Project. If they are available, these outside pa more »
This discussion seminar will focus on racial factors in the criminal justice system, using the Central Park 5 case and the Netflix series "When They See Us" as the jumping off point for the discussion. Following each episode of the series, the seminar will discuss the investigation, the trial, incarceration and post incarceration experiences. Although there may be some readings, the primary material will be the Netflix series. I hope to have some additional help with the discussion by asking a few outside players to join the class. Participants could include George Gascon, the recently elected progressive District Attorney in Los Angeles who has been a leader in the investigation of racism in enforcement of the laws, and our alum Emily Galvin Almanza. Co-Founder and Executive Director, Partners for Justice, Mike Romano, who leads our Three Strikes Project, and one of the Three Strikers whose release was secured by Stanford's Three Strike Project. If they are available, these outside participants will join the discussion in order to be a resource and to provide color and insight into the topics being covered. Elements used in grading: Full attendance, reading of assigned materials, and active participation. The seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. Note: After an initial meeting on campus 4:30-6:30, this Seminar will hold three meetings at Prof. Mills' home in San Francisco. Mini-bus transportation will be provided, departing SLS at 4:30 and arriving back at SLS est. 8:30-9:00. Class will meet September 9, September 23, October 12, October 28.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Mills, D. (PI)

LAW 240Q: Discussion (1L): Human Reproduction in the 21st Century: Legal and Ethical Issues

This group will discuss issues around human reproduction in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will talk about abortion and the problems of when life or rights begin, eugenics, embryo selection, and embryo editing (also known as "designer babies"). An underlying theme will be how "we" -- a culture, as a legal system, as legal systems -- decide what should and shouldn't be done. Elements used in grading: Full attendance, reading of assigned materials, and active participation. The seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. Class meets 7:00-9:00pm, September 21, October 12, October 26, November 9.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)

LAW 240T: Discussion (1L): Race and Technology

There is sometimes a tendency to describe technology as value neutral, as simply a tool that can be used for good or evil, particularly when questions of race and racial justice are involved. But the technologies we develop and deploy are shaped by historical prejudices, biases, and inequalities and thus are no less biased and racist than the underlying society in which they exist. In this discussion group, we will examine how racial and other biases are inherent in a wide range of technologies, including "risk assessment" algorithms for predictive policing or other decisions in the criminal justice system, facial recognition systems, surveillance tools, diagnostic algorithms for medical diagnosis and treatment decisions, "digital redlining" through housing ads, programs that determine entitlement to credit or public benefits and/or purport to detect fraud by recipients, algorithms used in recruiting and hiring, digital divide access gaps, and more. Building on these various case studi more »
There is sometimes a tendency to describe technology as value neutral, as simply a tool that can be used for good or evil, particularly when questions of race and racial justice are involved. But the technologies we develop and deploy are shaped by historical prejudices, biases, and inequalities and thus are no less biased and racist than the underlying society in which they exist. In this discussion group, we will examine how racial and other biases are inherent in a wide range of technologies, including "risk assessment" algorithms for predictive policing or other decisions in the criminal justice system, facial recognition systems, surveillance tools, diagnostic algorithms for medical diagnosis and treatment decisions, "digital redlining" through housing ads, programs that determine entitlement to credit or public benefits and/or purport to detect fraud by recipients, algorithms used in recruiting and hiring, digital divide access gaps, and more. Building on these various case studies, we will seek to articulate a framework for recognizing both explicit and subtle anti-black and other biases in tech and understanding them in the broader context of racism and inequality in our society. Finally, we will discuss how these problems might be addressed, including by regulators, legislators, and courts as well as by significant changes in mindset and practical engagement by technology developers and educators. Elements used in grading: Full attendance, reading of assigned materials, and active participation. The seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. Class meets 4:30-6:30pm, September 23, October 7, October 21, November 4.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Malone, P. (PI)
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