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1 - 10 of 20 results for: INTLPOL ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

INTLPOL 203A: New Generation International Trade Policy and Trade Agreements

This course analyses the new trends in international trade law and policy in an era when the days of global liberalization are in the past, protectionism is dominating the international trade agenda, and the multilateral order is at a standstill. This is prompting countries towards increasingly large regional trade agreements, including on South-South trade. Students will assess the emergence of sophisticated `new generation' trade agreements that go beyond the liberalization of trade in goods and services towards upholding labor and environmental standards and ensuring that competition is conducted fairly by avoiding countries undercutting each other on regulation. Trade initiatives in India and China, trade agreements and trade strategy in Africa and Latin America, the European trade agenda, US trade leadership, and the US China trade war will be discussed. The course will also cover the proliferation of unilateral sanctions and export controls that are currently shaping the internat more »
This course analyses the new trends in international trade law and policy in an era when the days of global liberalization are in the past, protectionism is dominating the international trade agenda, and the multilateral order is at a standstill. This is prompting countries towards increasingly large regional trade agreements, including on South-South trade. Students will assess the emergence of sophisticated `new generation' trade agreements that go beyond the liberalization of trade in goods and services towards upholding labor and environmental standards and ensuring that competition is conducted fairly by avoiding countries undercutting each other on regulation. Trade initiatives in India and China, trade agreements and trade strategy in Africa and Latin America, the European trade agenda, US trade leadership, and the US China trade war will be discussed. The course will also cover the proliferation of unilateral sanctions and export controls that are currently shaping the international trade agenda. Additionally, the course analyses the attempts to address technology/data transfers and cybersecurity in bilateral and multilateral trade agreements, despite regulation in those areas still being developed at a national level. The course will be taught from the pragmatic point of view of a former trade negotiator and trade law practitioner, combining wider foreign policy considerations with trade law concepts, and drawing on practical examples from multilateral and bilateral trade negotiations. The course is orientated towards advanced undergraduates and graduate students with an interest in both foreign affairs and international law. It will provide any student who aims to play a role in foreign affairs, trade negotiations or international public law with a solid foundation to build upon. While the course explores trade policy and law mechanisms, it does not require prior knowledge of trade law or trade agreements. There are no course prerequisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

INTLPOL 204A: Microeconomics for Policy (PUBLPOL 51, PUBLPOL 301A)

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PublPol 51 as a substitute for the Econ 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take Econ 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Bulow, J. (PI)

INTLPOL 220: Comparative Political Economy of Development

Review of how nations develop politically and economically. Theories of state development, the role of institutions, inequality and societal divisions, the impact of natural resources, the consequences of corruption, and the effect of globalization on the world's poor. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. Bridges theory and practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Mistree, D. (PI)

INTLPOL 230: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

INTLPOL 244: U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia (EASTASN 244)

This course examines contemporary issues in U.S. foreign policy towards China, Japan, South and North Korea, Russia and Taiwan. It will look at US interests and objectives in Northeast Asia, the dynamics and drivers of U.S. policy and its historical evolution. The course will focus in more detail on US relations and policy toward Japan, Korea, and China. It will also look at specific dimensions of US foreign policy - security relations, economic and trade relations, human rights, and democracy. The course will look at contemporary issues including the response to the pandemic as well as the policies of the incoming Presidential administration. The class will combine lectures with student led presentations on the issues under discussion. Students will be asked to make presentations on those issues and to lead discussion - after the first opening lectures on US policy, the first class each week will have a lecture on the assigned topic; the Thursday class will be built around student presentations.nThere will be midterm and final papers.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4

INTLPOL 256: Technology and National Security: Past, Present, and Future (MS&E 193, MS&E 293)

Explores the relation between technology, war, and national security policy from early history to modern day, focusing on current U.S. national security challenges and the role that technology plays in shaping our understanding and response to these challenges. Topics include the interplay between technology and modes of warfare; dominant and emerging technologies such as nuclear weapons, cyber, sensors, stealth, and biological; security challenges to the U.S.; and the U.S. response and adaptation to new technologies of military significance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

INTLPOL 268: Hack Lab

This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

INTLPOL 268D: Online Open Source Investigation

This course is a practical introduction to online open source investigation -- internet research using free and publicly available information. The course will cover domain investigations, social media research, image verification, and research into cryptocurrency transactions. The goal of the course is to prepare students for online open source research in jobs in the public sector, with technology companies, human rights organizations, and other research and advocacy groups.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Grossman, S. (PI)

INTLPOL 271: Climate Politics: Science and Global Governance (HISTORY 202J)

Historical and contemporary perspectives on climate politics. Briefly covers the origins of climate understanding in the 1800s, then turns to the co-evolution of climate science and climate politics from the 20th century to the present, including multiple political issues and debates that established human impacts on the global atmosphere. The last half of the course focuses on the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the 2015 Paris Agreement, the 2021 IPCC Sixth Assessment Report, organized climate disinformation, and the future of international climate policy and fossil fuels. Assignments include in-class presentations and a policy brief or research paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

INTLPOL 275: International Environmental Governance (ENVRES 224)

What kinds of rules, agreements, organizations, and processes underpin the global community's efforts to address environmental challenges? How do these institutions arise and interconnect, and how can we design them more effectively? We will explore these questions through foundational theory, attention to current policy dilemmas, and engagement with guest speakers on the front lines of environmental policymaking and implementation. Drawing on the instructors' active research areas, we will emphasize forest and river basin management challenges in Latin America, though students are encouraged to contribute experiences from a range of geographies and policy arenas. Having gained an understanding of the environmental institutional landscape and its current challenges, students will be better-equipped for careers and/or further study related to international environmental governance and policy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
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