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1 - 10 of 21 results for: ILAC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (COMPLIT 111Q)

The Argentinian writer and translator, Jorge Luis Borges, once said, 'Cada idioma es un modo de sentir el universo.' How are modes of feeling and perception translated across languages? How does the historical context of a work condition its translation into and out of a language? In this course, you will translate from a variety of genres that will teach you the practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. By the end of the term, you will have translated and received feedback on a project of your own choosing. Discussion topics may include: the importance of register, tone, and audience; the gains, in addition to the losses, that translations may introduce; the role of ideological, social-political, and aesthetic factors on the production of translations; and comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems. Preference will be given to sophomores but freshman through seniors have enjoyed this course in the past. Course taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 122A: Radical Poetry: The Avant-garde in Latin America and Spain (COMPLIT 122A)

The first few decades of the 20th century ushered in a dynamic literary and aesthetic renewal in Spain and Latin America. Young poets sought a radical change in response to a rapidly changing world, one marked by the horrors of World War I and the rise of a new technological urban society. This course will focus on the poetry and attendant manifestos of movements such as Creacionismo, Ultraismo, Estridentismo, Surrealismo and other -ismos. How did the European avant-garde (e.g. Futurism, Dada, and Surrealism) inform such aesthetic turns? In what ways did poetry assimilate modern visual culture while questioning established poetics? Authors may include Aleixandre, Borges, Cansino-Assens, G. Diego, G. de Torre, Huidobro, Larrea, Lorca, Maples Arce, Neruda, Tablada, and Vallejo. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 129: Queer Latin America in Literature and Film in the 20th Century (FEMGEN 146)

This course will study a selection of literary and cinematic works to interrogate how 20th Latin American cultural production challenged patriarchal conceptions of gender and sexuality. Some of the questions that we will addressed are: Can we speak of `queer literature' in Latin America? What are the questions to which these works respond considering their particular conditions? What have been the major shifts in queer Latin American aesthetics throughout the 20th century? The goal is to understand how Latin American writers and artists have imagined queerness vis-à-vis the logics of global circulation of discourses on sex and gender.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-A-II

ILAC 130: Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will cover the period from the loss of the Spanish empire, through the civil wars and dictatorships to the end of the Portuguese Estado Novo and the monarchic restoration in Spain. Particular attention will be given to the Peninsula's difficult negotiation of its cultural and national diversity, with an emphasis on current events. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study program in Spain. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 140: Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film (CHILATST 140)

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an ever-growing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: Bolivia, Copacabana, La teta asustada, Norteado, Sin nombre, Migración, Ulises, among others. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-A-II

ILAC 159: Don Quijote

Focus is on a close reading of Miguel de Cervantes's prose masterpiece. Topics include: the rise of the novel, problems of authorship and meaning, modes of reading, the status of Muslim and Jewish converts in early modern Spain, the rise of capitalism, masochistic desire. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. A survey of significant authors and works of Hispanic and Brazilian Portuguese literatures, focusing on fictional prose and poetry. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. As a Writing in the Major (WIM) course, ILAC 161 provides structured opportunities for ILAC and Spanish majors to gradually develop their scholarly writing skills in Spanish. This component of the course is optional for non-majors. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, GER:DB-Hum

ILAC 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ILAC 199: Individual Work

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 12 units total)

ILAC 218: Shipwrecks and Backlands: Getting Lost in Literature (COMPLIT 214, COMPLIT 314A, ILAC 318)

This course takes students on a journey through tales of getting lost in the Portuguese and Spanish empires. We will read harrowing stories of being caught adrift at sea and mystical interpretations of island desertion. The course begins with sea-dominated stories of Portuguese voyages to Asia, Africa, and Brazil then turns to how the Amazon and the sertão, or backlands, became a driving force of Brazilian literature. Official historians, poets, and novelists imbued the ocean and the backlands with romanticism, yet these spaces were the backdrop to slavery and conquest. Instead of approaching shipwreck and captivity narratives as eyewitness testimonies, as many have, we will consider how they produced 'the sea' and 'the wilderness' as poetic constructions in Western literature while also offering glimpses of the 'darker side' of Iberian expansion. Taught in English with all texts offered both in English and the original Portuguese or Spanish. Optional guest lectures in Portuguese.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
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