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1 - 10 of 28 results for: HUMBIO ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMBIO 2A: Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to the evolutionary study of human diversity, the origins of social complexity, and the field of demography. Topics will include hominid evolution, population dynamics and the demographic transition, the impact of disease on societies, social theory, and patterns and consequences of inequality. HUMBIO2B, with HUMBIO3B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently. Periodically there will be joint module lectures that address related content in the two courses. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors to meet recommended declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER: DB-NatSci

HUMBIO 2B: Culture, Evolution, and Society

Introduction to the evolutionary study of human diversity, the origins of social complexity, and the field of demography. Topics will include hominid evolution, population dynamics and the demographic transition, the impact of disease on societies, social theory, and patterns and consequences of inequality. HUMBIO2B, with HUMBIO3B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently. Periodically there will be joint module lectures that address related content in the two courses. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors to meet recommended declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 14: Understanding Connections between Food and the Environment

Globally, food systems, what we eat, where and how we grow it, play a major role in determining our impact on the environment. By considering our food choices, we can find "low hanging vegetables" for reducing our "foodprint". In this course, we will begin to explore the complex connections between food and the environment. We will begin with a discussion of "Planetary Boundaries" as a guide for understanding the limits for human alterations of the biosphere, beyond which abrupt changes could occur. We will then introduce nine topics which will be discussed in the nine weeks to follow, and how they relate to food.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1

HUMBIO 28: Health Impact of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse across the Lifecourse (AFRICAAM 28, FEMGEN 237, SOMGEN 237)

(Human Biology students must enroll in HUMBIO 28 or AFRICAAM 28. Med/Grad students should enroll in SOMGEN 237 for 1-3 units.) An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units.To receive a letter grade in any listing, students must enroll for 3 units. This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

HUMBIO 29A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

HUMBIO 57: Epidemic Intelligence: How to Identify, Investigate and Interrupt Outbreaks of Disease (EPI 247)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 57. Med/Graduate students must enroll in EPI 247.) We will cover: the components of public health systems in the US; principles of outbreak investigation and disease surveillance; different types of study design for field investigation; visualization and interpretation of public health data, including identification and prevention of biases; and implementation of disease control by public health authorities. Students will meet with leaders of health departments of the state and the county and will be responsible for devising, testing and evaluating a field questionnaire to better understand the complexities of field research. (Formerly HRP 247)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

HUMBIO 82B: Advanced Data Analysis in Qualitative Research

This course is designed to support upperclass undergraduates who have collected ¿ or are collecting ¿ qualitative data in completion of Honors Thesis research. The course will review methods of qualitative data organization (field note amendment, transcription, data indexing, conceptual memo writing) and teach methods of qualitative data analysis (mutli-stage coding, data modeling, charting, use of analytic software) and examine best methods for the reporting of qualitative research. The course introduces methodologies through readings, sample data sets, and group practice; students then display learning by executing these methodologies on their own data, and reporting findings and methods.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolf, J. (PI)

HUMBIO 89: Introduction to Health Sciences Statistics

This course aims to provide a firm grounding in the foundations of probability and statistics, with a focus on analyzing data from the health sciences. Students will learn how to read, interpret, and critically evaluate the statistics in medical and biological studies. The course also prepares students to be able to analyze their own data, guiding them on how to choose the correct statistical test, avoid common statistical pitfalls, and perform basic functions in R deducer. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 89X: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology (EPI 259)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 89X. Med/Graduate students must enroll in EPI 259.) Topics: random variables, expectation, variance, probability distributions, the central limit theorem, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals. Correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and nonparametric tests. Introduction to least squares and maximum likelihood estimation. Emphasis is on medical applications. (Formerly HRP 259)
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 116: Climate Perspectives: Climate Science, Impacts, Policy, Negotiations, and Advocacy (PUBLPOL 116)

The course contains four main parts:Climate Science, Climate Impacts, Climate Policy, Climate Advocacy. Part I begins with a detailed introduction to climate science, including an assessment of arguments by climate science skeptics, and an examination of climate change models. Part II describes the impacts of climate change on the planet, human health, species and biodiversity, and it adds an economic perspective on the costs and benefits of responding now¿or later¿to climate change. Part II also include a discussion on climate change ethics, i.e., fairness and responsibility among individuals, nations, and generations. Part III focuses on climate policy, from the Kyoto Protocol to the Paris Accord. Part III also includes an introduction to how the public and officials have viewed climate change over time, and it explores factors that make widespread formal agreement difficult. Part IV looks forward to climate advocacy and what to expect from future of climate negotiations. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor (i.e. background in earth systems, economics, policy).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Nation, J. (PI)
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