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1 - 10 of 24 results for: GSBGEN ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GSBGEN 208: Leading with Values

With leadership comes responsibility. This course explores the numerous ethical issues faced by managers and organizations and provides analytical frameworks as well as the latest findings on human behavior to inform ethical decisions and strategies. Readings involve controversial case studies, insights from experimental psychology and economics, and a brief introduction to some relevant philosophy. Through class exercises, rigorous discussion, and personal reflection, you will clarify your own ethical stance, think through ethical dilemmas, practice articulating recommendations compellingly, discover the diversity of ethical viewpoints, and find out how to avoid the social and cognitive pitfalls that come in the way of ethical leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

GSBGEN 299: The Core Curriculum in the Workplace

GSB students are eligible to report on work experience that is relevant to their core studies under the direction of the Senior Associate Dean responsible for the MBA Program. Registration for this work must be approved by the Assistant Dean of the MBA Program and is limited to students who present a project which, in judgment of the Advisor, may be undertaken to enhance the material learned in the first year core required courses. It is expected that this research be carried on by the student with a large degree of independence and the expected result is a written report, typically due at the end of the quarter in which the course is taken. Specific assignment details and deadline information will be communicated to enrolled students. Units earned for this course do not meet the requirements needed for graduation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 8 units total)

GSBGEN 312: I'm Just a Bill

This is a class on how public policy gets made at the highest levels of the federal government. In the first part of the quarter, lectures and discussions lead to single-class simulations, in which students role-play as legislators. The second part of the class is a 5-6 week continuous role-playing legislative simulation. Students will role-play as Members of the House of Representatives and Senate, or as senior advisors to a president. You will participate in legislative debate, voting, offering amendments, and extensive policy and legislative negotiation, with the goal of enacting a new law.You will:-Learn a bit about three policy issues (likely climate change, economics, and immigration);-Learn both the formal and informal rules of legislating¿how a bill really becomes a law; and-Develop and practice your "soft skills," including persuasion, negotiation, leadership, strategy, and organizational analysis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensu more »
Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback. In this course you will learn to: - Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational level - Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents - Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style - Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences - Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aids Students at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 333: Technology Licensing: Strategy and Negotiation

Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Because licenses are complex agreements with important legal consequences, it is tempting for business executives to delegate to lawyers the negotiation of the ¿non-economic terms¿ of their companies¿ technology license agreements. The problem with such an approach, however, is that at their core, issues of license structure, scope and risk require business judgments, and not merely legal ones. Do we need exclusive rights, and if so, to what, where and for how long? Will this prospective licensee bring our technology to market, and how do we mitigate the risk that it fails to do so? Can this licensor support our development efforts, and will it stand behind its IP in the event of a problem? Do we expose the guts of our technology to the world and try to protect it with patents, or do we keep it c more »
Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Because licenses are complex agreements with important legal consequences, it is tempting for business executives to delegate to lawyers the negotiation of the ¿non-economic terms¿ of their companies¿ technology license agreements. The problem with such an approach, however, is that at their core, issues of license structure, scope and risk require business judgments, and not merely legal ones. Do we need exclusive rights, and if so, to what, where and for how long? Will this prospective licensee bring our technology to market, and how do we mitigate the risk that it fails to do so? Can this licensor support our development efforts, and will it stand behind its IP in the event of a problem? Do we expose the guts of our technology to the world and try to protect it with patents, or do we keep it close and rely upon trade secrets? While counsel can offer advice on all these questions, they cannot know your business and competitive environment as you do, or be relied upon to optimize business trade-offs that must align not just with your company¿s present markets and strategies, but with those you expect it to pursue in the future. This course is organized around two hypothetical companies seeking to negotiate a technology license agreement. Divided into teams representing one or the other of these companies, students collaborate over multiple sessions to develop a strategic business approach and then to negotiate the critical terms of a licensing agreement. Lectures are focused on the business, and to a lesser extent, legal issues arising in complex licensing arrangements, and are designed to give students the context and perspective they need to participate effectively in licensing strategy development and negotiation. By immersing teams of business students in a multi-session licensing negotiation, it is the objective of this course to enable them to better understand and more effectively navigate the strategic business issues that arise in the conceptualization and negotiation of technology license agreements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GSBGEN 348: The Economics of Higher Education

(Same as EDUC 347) Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GSBGEN 352: Winning Writing

This once-a-week full-quarter workshop will offer techniques and practical in-class exercises for writing better -- better memos, emails, cold-call letters, speeches, feedback for colleagues, news releases, responses to questions from the media and from interviewers, and opinion pieces. Glenn Kramon, an editor who has helped New York Times reporters win 10 Pulitzer Prizes, will teach the course along with accomplished journalists with expertise in powerful, persuasive writing for business. They will provide not only helpful tips but constructive feedback on students' work. They will also share thoughts on how best to work with the news media.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kramon, G. (PI)

GSBGEN 363: Fiscal Policy

One of every five dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss process reforms including spending and deficit reduction targets, a balanced budget amendment, and line more »
One of every five dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss process reforms including spending and deficit reduction targets, a balanced budget amendment, and line item veto. We'll cover the major players in the budget debate and understand where the big and small budget decisions are made. We'll look at federal taxation, where the money comes from, how it affects the economy, and how it might be restructured. And we'll see if we, as a class, can solve our nation's fiscal problems as Washington has so far been unable to do.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GSBGEN 367: Problem Solving for Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems¿in areas such as education, health, energy, and domestic and global poverty¿that call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles, covering topics such as designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing behavior; and pay-for-success programs. The large majority of the course will be devoted to students¿ working in teams to apply these concepts and tools to an actual problem, with teams choosing whatever problem interests them.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

GSBGEN 390: Individual Research

Need approval from sponsoring faculty member and GSB Registrar.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Abrahams, M. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Akbarpour, M. (PI) ; Allende Santa Cruz, C. (PI) ; Alper, B. (PI) ; Andrews, C. (PI) ; Antoni, F. (PI) ; Arrillaga, L. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Atwell, J. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Begenau, J. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berg, J. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Binsbergen, J. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Blattner, L. (PI) ; Brady, S. (PI) ; Brest, P. (PI) ; Bronnenberg, B. (PI) ; Broockman, D. (PI) ; Buchak, G. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carmel-Hurwitz, D. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Carstensen, L. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; Chess, R. (PI) ; Chin, L. (PI) ; Choi, J. (PI) ; Clement, J. (PI) ; Corney, A. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Demarest, D. (PI) ; Dexter, G. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Dobbs, C. (PI) ; Dodson, D. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Dulski, J. (PI) ; Ellis, J. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Francisco, R. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Gelfand, M. (PI) ; Gipper, B. (PI) ; Glickman, M. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Golden, S. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Grousbeck, H. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Guttentag, B. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Harmon, M. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hebert, B. (PI) ; Hennessey, K. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Hurley, J. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Johnson, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Joss, R. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Keelan, H. (PI) ; Kelly, P. (PI) ; Kepler, J. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Kim, J. (PI) ; Kim, Y. (PI) ; Kluger, A. (PI) ; Kosinski, M. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Kramon, G. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Krubert, C. (PI) ; Kupor, S. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Leslie, M. (PI) ; Lester, R. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Levin, J. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Lustig, H. (PI) ; Maggiori, M. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Mandelbaum, F. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; Martin, A. (PI) ; Martin, G. (PI) ; McGonigal, K. (PI) ; McLennan, S. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Milligan, J. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Monzon, L. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Noh, S. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Peterson, J. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Ranganathan, A. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rapp, A. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Risk, G. (PI) ; Robles Garcia, C. (PI) ; Saban, D. (PI) ; Saloner, G. (PI) ; Sannikov, Y. (PI) ; Schulman, K. (PI) ; Seru, A. (PI) ; Sharabi Levine, Y. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singh, H. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Smith, K. (PI) ; Somaini, P. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Spiess, J. (PI) ; Sterling, A. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Tully, S. (PI) ; Urstein, R. (PI) ; Vasserman, S. (PI) ; Wager, S. (PI) ; Weaver, G. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Weintraub, G. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Wood, D. (PI) ; Xu, C. (PI) ; Xu, K. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zhong, W. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI)
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