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1 - 10 of 15 results for: GERMAN ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GERMAN 57N: Nietzsche and the Search for Meaning

Many of us have heard his declarations of the death of God, the arrival of the Superman, and the need to live beyond good and evil. But what, beyond such sound bites, did Nietzsche actually teach? How can his writings be understood in the context of their own time? And what significance might they hold for us today?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Smith, M. (PI)

GERMAN 120B: Fairy Tales

Fairy tales loom largely in our lives. They are 'weird,' but not shallow or irrelevant: they tell the 'extraordinary' in different traditions and facilitate cross-and transcultural dialogues between them. In this course, we will read German fairy tales from the Grimm Brothers, Novalis, Tieck, Bettina von Arnim, E.T.A. Hoffmann, etc., focus on their connections to the stories in other traditions, and explore their transformations in various media from oral storytelling to films, comic books, and music videos. We will reinterpret these fairy tales by using methodologies derived from psychoanalysis, folklore, gender, and race studies and open a creative environment for your own tales. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Deniz, M. (PI)

GERMAN 130A: A History of German Opera

When we think of opera, and perhaps especially German opera, a list of stereotypes immediately springs to mind: tenors who refuse to die, horned helmets and blond braids, an artform so elite that it has lost all relevance in the contemporary world. While not discounting those images, this course will position opera at the center of Germany's historical and cultural development over the past three centuries - from early discussions about the country's place between the more culturally hegemonic Italy and France, to its struggle for unification in the 19th century, to the Third Reich's co-opting of all 'German' forms of expression to serve its ends. We will discuss German opera's link to movements like Romanticism and Expressionism, and to philosophers like Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. Along the way, we will learn how to listen to and talk about this very strange genre, and gain fluency in a range of musical styles and periods. No musical expertise required; taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 21 or instructor permission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Goodling, E. (PI)

GERMAN 150: Masterpieces: Kafka (COMPLIT 114, JEWISHST 145)

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ILAC 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 267: Prospects for Transatlantic Relations: What Holds the West Together? (GERMAN 367)

This seminar treats contemporary issues in trans-Atlantic relations including the new dynamics after Merkel and Trump, the shadows of Russia and China, and the legacies of the pandemic. This course involves participation in an international conference during November and the preparation of individual research papers. Meeting times: the seminar will meet from 9:00 to 11:00am in room 260-252 on Monday, Nov. 1; Wednesday, Nov. 3; and Friday, Nov. 5, 2021.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2

GERMAN 277: Technology and Culture Between Stagnation or Progress

Examination of relations between technology and culture through a series of conversations with Peter Thiel, concerning the conditions and limits of progress. How does creativity happen? What gets in the way of change? Discussions of innovation with reference to cultural theory and in light of contemporary developments, through readings by authors such as Leo Strauss, Oswald Spengler, Carl Schmitt, Ernst Jünger, Hannah Arendt as well as Ross Douthat, Joan Didion, and Christopher Caldwell. Taught in English. NOTE: To be considered for enrollment in this course, please complete and submit this short application by August 23, 2021 at 11:59pm PST. Students accepted to participate in this course will be notified on August 30, 2021 by 6:00pm. Auditors are not permitted. Link to application: https://forms.gle/Z9A4uWqyNMe7ixdY6
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 287: Hope in the Modern Age (COMPLIT 287, JEWISHST 287)

Immanuel Kant famously considered "What may I hope?" to be the third and final question of philosophy. This course considers the thinkers, from Immanuel Kant to Judith Butler, who have attempted to answer this question from within the context of modernity. Has revolution replaced religion as the object of our hope? Has Enlightenment lived up to its promises? These topics and more will be discussed, with readings from thinkers including Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Adorno, and Arendt, alongside the literature of writers such as Kafka, Celan, Nelly Sachs, among others, and with particular focus on the question of hope within the German-Jewish tradition.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

GERMAN 367: Prospects for Transatlantic Relations: What Holds the West Together? (GERMAN 267)

This seminar treats contemporary issues in trans-Atlantic relations including the new dynamics after Merkel and Trump, the shadows of Russia and China, and the legacies of the pandemic. This course involves participation in an international conference during November and the preparation of individual research papers. Meeting times: the seminar will meet from 9:00 to 11:00am in room 260-252 on Monday, Nov. 1; Wednesday, Nov. 3; and Friday, Nov. 5, 2021.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
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