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1 - 10 of 40 results for: GEOLSCI ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GEOLSCI 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (EARTHSYS 38N, ESS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)

GEOLSCI 42: Moving and Shaking in the Bay Area (EARTH 42)

Active faulting and erosion in the Bay Area, and its effects upon landscapes. Earth science concepts and skills through investigation of the valley, mountain, and coastal areas around Stanford. Faulting associated with the San Andreas Fault, coastal processes along the San Mateo coast, uplift of the mountains by plate tectonic processes, and landsliding in urban and mountainous areas. Field excursions; student projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hilley, G. (PI)

GEOLSCI 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (AMSTUD 118X, CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students t more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) and Winter (Y) courses are focused on basic and advanced skills, respectively, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Spring (Z) practicum quarter, which engages teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X and Y are composed of four weekly pedagogical components: (A) lectures; (B) writing prompts linked with small group discussion; (C) lab and self-guided tutorials on the R programming language; and (D) R data analysis assignments. Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu/education.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-AQR

GEOLSCI 127: Planetary Science Reading (GEOLSCI 227, GEOPHYS 126, GEOPHYS 226)

The course will meet once a week to discuss a recent journal article related to the broad field of planetary science, including but not limited to cosmochemistry, planet formation, planetary geology, planetary atmospheres, Earth history, astrobiology, and exoplanets. Students will be expected to lead the group discussion at least once per quarter. No formal presentations will be required. There are no prerequisites for this course, but students should have some facility with reading scientific literature.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Schaefer, L. (PI)

GEOLSCI 129: Paleomagnetism (GEOLSCI 229, GEOPHYS 139, GEOPHYS 239)

Introduction to planetary magnetic fields and how they are recorded by rocks on Earth and other solar system bodies. Topics covered will include dynamo magnetic field generation and evolution, magnetization acquisition processes, paleointensity, paleogeography, magnetostratigraphy, biomagnetism, environmental magnetism, and extraterrestrial magnetism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Tikoo, S. (PI)

GEOLSCI 134: Environmental Geochemistry of Petroleum and Refined Products (GEOLSCI 234)

This course focuses on petroleum, including hydrocarbon gases, liquids, and refined products, such as chlorinated hydrocarbons, gasoline, and fuel oil, and the methods used to monitor environmental contamination and remediation. The course is designed for geologists and environmental geoscientists. Lectures show how geochemistry can be used to better understand the origin of petroleum contaminants and the processes that affect the composition and distribution of petroleum in the subsurface and in subaerial spills, such as biodegradation, photooxidation, and water washing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Peters, K. (PI)

GEOLSCI 150: Senior Seminar: Issues in Earth Sciences (GEOPHYS 199)

Focus is on written and oral communication in a topical context. Topics from current frontiers in earth science research and issues of concern to the public. Readings, oral presentations, written work, and peer review.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GEOLSCI 164: Geochemical Thermodynamics (GEOLSCI 264)

This course covers equilibrium thermodynamics relevant to geological systems with emphasis on practical numerical approaches. Students will learn how to perform Gibbs-energy minimization to define the equilibrium state of simple systems. Additional topics include: phase equilibrium, phase transitions (including melting), solution chemistry, mineral-solution equilibria, equations of state, gas phase chemistry, and element partitioning. Prerequisites: GEOLSCI 90 and GEOLSCI 102, or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Schaefer, L. (PI)

GEOLSCI 192: Undergraduate Research in Geological Sciences

Field-, lab-, or literature-based. Faculty supervision. Written reports. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

GEOLSCI 197: Senior Thesis

For seniors who wish to write a thesis based on research in 192 or as a summer research fellow. May not be repeated for credit; may not be taken if enrolled in 199.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5
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