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1 - 10 of 24 results for: FILMEDIA ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FILMEDIA 4: Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to Film Study introduces you to film as art, as entertainment, a field of study, and an everyday cultural practice. This course enables you to analyze films in terms of their formal elements, themes, and narrative structures. You learn to 'read' details of cinematic 'language' such as the arrangement of shots (editing), the composition and framing of a shot (cinematography), the overall look of a film (mise-en-scene), and its sound environment. We not only identify such cinematic details, but also consider how they contribute to the overall meaning of a film. Thinking about film and writing about film are intricately linked and inform each other deeply. Learning to write about film with sophistication requires a grasp of the mechanics of writing, familiarity with film terminology, and an understanding of film theory and history. This course helps you develop skills in critical viewing, reading, and writing. We explore basic concepts that have been important to the study of film, such as genre, authorship, and stardom to comprehend how films make meaning within their social, political, cultural, and historical contexts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum

FILMEDIA 6: Introduction to Media (FILMEDIA 306)

What is a medium? This course starts from the assumption that the answer to this question is not as obvious as it might at first appear. Clearly, we know some media when we see them: radio, film, and television are in many ways paradigmatic media of the twentieth century. But what about the computational, networked media of the twenty-first century? Are these still media in the same sense, or has the nature of media changed with the emergence of digital technologies? And what, for that matter, about pre-technical media? Is painting a medium in the same sense that oil or acrylic are media, or in the sense that we speak of mixed media? Is language a medium? Are numbers? Is the body? As we shall see, the question of what a medium is raises a number of other questions of a theoretical or even philosophical nature. How is our experience of the world affected or shaped by media? Are knowledge and perception possible apart from media, or are they always mediated by the apparatuses, instrument more »
What is a medium? This course starts from the assumption that the answer to this question is not as obvious as it might at first appear. Clearly, we know some media when we see them: radio, film, and television are in many ways paradigmatic media of the twentieth century. But what about the computational, networked media of the twenty-first century? Are these still media in the same sense, or has the nature of media changed with the emergence of digital technologies? And what, for that matter, about pre-technical media? Is painting a medium in the same sense that oil or acrylic are media, or in the sense that we speak of mixed media? Is language a medium? Are numbers? Is the body? As we shall see, the question of what a medium is raises a number of other questions of a theoretical or even philosophical nature. How is our experience of the world affected or shaped by media? Are knowledge and perception possible apart from media, or are they always mediated by the apparatuses, instruments, or assemblages of media? What is the relation between the forms and the contents of media, and how does this relation bear on questions of aesthetics, science, technology, or politics? The lecture-based course addresses these and other questions and seeks in this way to introduce a way of thinking about media that goes beyond taken-for-granted ideas and assumptions, and that has a potentially transformative effect on a wide range of theoretical and practical interests.nnnFilm & Media Studies majors and minors must enroll for 5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FILMEDIA 38: Comics: More than Words (DLCL 238, ENGLISH 1C)

This group seeks to establish a bridge among the different researchers who have worked on Comics from different disciplines and to conduct research on them from a transnational, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary perspective. We consider Comics to have rich traditions and artistic works that have been underexplored and have plenty to contribute to debates on Queer and LGBTQ+ studies, feminist studies, cultural theory, bio-politics, and the relation between fiction and techno-science, among others. By looking at the world from the academically peripheral standpoints of graphic narratives, popular culture, fandom, visual studies, and superheroes, Comics offers a uniquely critical insight into modern societies. nnTo earn the unit, students must attend all events hosted during the quarter, do the readings in advance of the meeting and participate actively in the discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

FILMEDIA 50Q: The Video Essay: Writing with Video about Media and Culture

In this seminar, we explore what it means to 'write with video,' and we learn to make effective and engaging video essays. Specifically, we examine strategies for communicating through video, and we conduct hands-on exercises using digital video editing software to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film, television, video games, online media, art, and culture. Compared with traditional text-based arguments, the video essay offers a remarkably direct mode of communicating critical and analytical ideas. Video essayists can simply show their viewers what they want them to see. This does not mean, however, that it is any easier than an essay composed with ink and paper. Like the written essay, the new technology introduces its own challenges and choices, including decisions about organization of space and time, audiovisual materials, onscreen text, voiceover commentary, and visual effects. By taking a hands-on approach, we develop our skills with editing software such a more »
In this seminar, we explore what it means to 'write with video,' and we learn to make effective and engaging video essays. Specifically, we examine strategies for communicating through video, and we conduct hands-on exercises using digital video editing software to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film, television, video games, online media, art, and culture. Compared with traditional text-based arguments, the video essay offers a remarkably direct mode of communicating critical and analytical ideas. Video essayists can simply show their viewers what they want them to see. This does not mean, however, that it is any easier than an essay composed with ink and paper. Like the written essay, the new technology introduces its own challenges and choices, including decisions about organization of space and time, audiovisual materials, onscreen text, voiceover commentary, and visual effects. By taking a hands-on approach, we develop our skills with editing software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and Apple's Final Cut Pro while also cultivating our awareness of the formal and narrative techniques employed in cinema and other moving-image media. Through weekly assignments and group critique sessions, we learn to express ourselves more effectively and creatively in audiovisual media. As a culmination of our efforts, we assemble a group exhibition of our best video essays for public display on campus.nNo previous experience is required, but a willingness to learn new technologies (in particular, video editing software) is important.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Denson, S. (PI)

FILMEDIA 100B: History of World Cinema II: 1929-59: Race, Imperialism and Techno-Modernity (FILMEDIA 300B)

Provides an overview of cinema made around the world between 1930 and 1960, highlighting technical, cultural, political, and economic forces that shaped mid-twentieth-century cinema. We study key film movements and national cinemas towards developing a formal, historical, and theoretical appreciation of a variety of commercial and art film traditions. Specific topics may vary by term/year/instructor.nnThis term's topic: This course examines the history of cinema from the early to the mid-20th century, within the landscape of technological innovation, imperialism, and anti-colonial movements. Interrogating the persistent Euro-centric vision in ethnographic cinema and its production of a primitive subject, we situate similar colonial fashioning in Classical Hollywood films of this period. Not only is colonial gaze projected through vision, but also through the arrival of mechanically reproduced sound. Films from the newly independent colonies help us examine the push and pull for representation and autonomy in global and local markets. Towards the end of this period, we see the emergence of a fully formed postcolonial cinema through the Third Cinema movement in Latin America, Africa, and Asia.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Deb, A. (PI)

FILMEDIA 210B: Documentary Perspectives: Observational Cinema (FILMEDIA 410B)

Historical, political, aesthetic, and formal developments of documentary film. Subjectivity, ethics, censorship, representation, reflexivity, responsibility to the audience, and authorial voice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Meltzer, J. (PI)

FILMEDIA 211N: Childish Enthusiasms and Perishable Manias

This course has a simple premise: Effective scholarship need not suck the joy from the world. G. K. Chesterton once wrote that 'it is the duty of every poet, and even of every critic, to dance in respectful imitation of the child.' What could it mean to do scholarship that respects a child's playful and exploratory engagement with the world? Such questions will be filtered through such 'unserious' media as amusement parks, comics, cartoons, musicals, and kidlit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Bukatman, S. (PI)

FILMEDIA 264B: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (AMSTUD 143X, ARTHIST 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FILMEDIA 280: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Students must obtain a new I-20 with CPT authorization prior to the employment start date. Professional experience in a field related to the cinematic arts (film, television, media) for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for production companies, producers, studios, networks, films, television series, directors, screenwriters, non-profit organizations, academic publications and related workplaces. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. Students submit three self-assessments, and evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Iyer, U. (PI)

FILMEDIA 281: Contemporary Asian Filmmakers (FILMEDIA 481)

Films and moving image works by contemporary filmmakers from Asia, including Hou Hsiao-hsien, Tsai Ming-liang, and Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Topics include explorations of national and local histories, aesthetics of slowness and duration, and crossings between the movie theater and the gallery.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Ma, J. (PI)
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