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1 - 10 of 17 results for: ENVRES ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENVRES 199: Independent study (ENVRES 299)

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 5 units total)

ENVRES 223: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Gender and Place (EARTHSYS 194, PWR 194EP)

This course examines the rhetoric, history and key case studies of environmental justice while encouraging critical and collaborative thinking, reading and researching about diversity in environmental movements within the global community and at Stanford, including the ways race, class and gender have shaped environmental battles still being fought today. We center diverse voices by bringing leaders, particularly from marginalized communities on the frontlines to our classroom to communicate experiences, insights and best practices. Together we will develop and present original research projects which may serve a particular organizational or community need, such as racialized dispossession, toxic pollution and human health, or indigenous land and water rights, among many others. Prerequisite: PWR 2
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ENVRES 224: International Environmental Governance (INTLPOL 275)

What kinds of rules, agreements, organizations, and processes underpin the global community's efforts to address environmental challenges? How do these institutions arise and interconnect, and how can we design them more effectively? We will explore these questions through foundational theory, attention to current policy dilemmas, and engagement with guest speakers on the front lines of environmental policymaking and implementation. Drawing on the instructors' active research areas, we will emphasize forest and river basin management challenges in Latin America, though students are encouraged to contribute experiences from a range of geographies and policy arenas. Having gained an understanding of the environmental institutional landscape and its current challenges, students will be better-equipped for careers and/or further study related to international environmental governance and policy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

ENVRES 225: E-IPER Current Topics Seminar

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times. Enrollment by department consent only. Contact instructor for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

ENVRES 229A: Policy Practicum: Smoke

Clients: Various California legislative and executive branch decision makers. Wildfire smoke has emerged as one of the most pressing air pollution and public health threats in the Western United States. Last year, despite decades of progress in reducing air pollution from transport, industry, and electric power, wildfires caused the highest number of "spare the air" declarations ever called by local Air Quality Management Districts in California. Oregon, Washington and Colorado all suffered similar "airpocalypse" fire seasons. Recent model-based estimates of mortality from wildfire smoke-derived particulate matter suggest that between 1200 and 3000 seniors likely died from the fires this summer. Current law and regulation not only doesn't consider particulate matter derived from wildfire smoke to be a target for regulation, it also imposes burdensome permitting requirements on one of the most effective risk-mitigation strategies: prescribed fire. This course will build on student work more »
Clients: Various California legislative and executive branch decision makers. Wildfire smoke has emerged as one of the most pressing air pollution and public health threats in the Western United States. Last year, despite decades of progress in reducing air pollution from transport, industry, and electric power, wildfires caused the highest number of "spare the air" declarations ever called by local Air Quality Management Districts in California. Oregon, Washington and Colorado all suffered similar "airpocalypse" fire seasons. Recent model-based estimates of mortality from wildfire smoke-derived particulate matter suggest that between 1200 and 3000 seniors likely died from the fires this summer. Current law and regulation not only doesn't consider particulate matter derived from wildfire smoke to be a target for regulation, it also imposes burdensome permitting requirements on one of the most effective risk-mitigation strategies: prescribed fire. This course will build on student work from last spring, where students explored regulatory obstacles to an expansion of prescribed burning in California and began developing a simplified air quality health benefits model to estimate the potential public health and economic benefits of better fuels management. This fall, we will continue refining the air quality model and, on the regulatory side, we will investigate potential new policy approaches to streamlining the approval process for prescribed burning projects while protecting environmental values with a particular focus on new approaches to NEPA and CEQA compliance for prescribed fire and cultural burning. The course is intended for students interested in multi-disciplinary approaches to public policy problems. No background in either the Clean Air Act or wildfire policy is required. Students will engage in weekly lecture and discussion of wildfire smoke science and policy, including student presentations. Students will also meet additionally once per week with Professors Sivas and Wara in working sessions to discuss progress on team projects. Students will present the results of their research to California legislative and executive branch staff engaged in developing new approaches to wildfire policy. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course is cross-listed with LAW 808D.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

ENVRES 240: Environmental Decision-Making and Risk Perception

Mobilizing successful conservation efforts to mitigate climate change and preserve both local and global ecosystems requires a new way of thinking. This course will investigate the barriers to pro-environmental behavior and the heuristics and biases that cloud our ability to respond effectively to environmental problems, using insights from behavioral economics, neuroeconomics, and environmental risk perception. Emphasis on interdisciplinary applications of recent research, and implications for environmental policymaking and persuasive messaging.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3

ENVRES 270: Graduate Practicum in Environment and Resources

Opportunity for E-IPER students to pursue areas of specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, governmental agency, non-governmental organization, or multilateral organization. Meets US CIS requirements for off-campus employment with endorsement from designated school official.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 24 times (up to 120 units total)

ENVRES 290: Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources

Required for and limited to E-IPER Joint M.S. and Dual M.S. students. Propose, conduct and publicly present final individual or team projects demonstrating the integration of professional (M.B.A., J.D., M.D., M.I.P., or Ph.D.) and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees. Presentation at the Week 10 Capstone Symposium and submission of final product required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3

ENVRES 295: Carbon Dioxide and Methane Removal, Utilization, and Sequestration (EARTHSYS 308, ENERGY 308, ESS 308, ME 308)

This is a seminar on carbon dioxide and methane removal, utilization, and sequestration options, and their role in decarbonizing the global energy system. This course will cover topics including the global carbon balance, utilizing atmospheric carbon in engineered solutions, recycling and sequestering fossil-based carbon, and enhancing natural carbon sinks. The multidisciplinary lectures and discussions will cover elements of technology, economics, policy and social acceptance, and will be led by a series of guest lecturers. Short group project on carbon solutions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

ENVRES 299: Independent study (ENVRES 199)

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 5 units total)
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