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1 - 10 of 28 results for: ENGR ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGR 1: Want to Be an Engineer?

This course is designed for you if you are a new student who has a hypothesis that you want to be a scientist, mathematician, or engineer but don't yet know what you want to major in. As a scientist, you know that you need data to test your hypothesis. As a design thinker, you know that there is no way forward except to be exposed to different things and weigh the results. As a potential engineer, you know that you need lots of information to make a decision. Each week a panel of faculty from STEM majors in the School of Engineering, the School of Humanities & Sciences, and Stanford Earth will present with the goal of helping you discover if their field is right for you.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

ENGR 2A: SSEA Seminar: Developing Your Leadership Toolkit

In this weekly seminar, SSEA students will learn practical leadership skills so they can successfully navigate academic and professional opportunities while at Stanford and achieve meaningful results. Mentorship and career exploration will also be delivered through an inspiring line up of guest speakers and interactive activities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Aynalem, B. (PI)

ENGR 10: Introduction to Engineering Analysis

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that are the cornerstones of engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses. Prerequisite: AP Physics and AP Calculus or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Cappelli, M. (PI)

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41. When signing up for this course make sure to sign up both for the lecture and for a Discussion Section.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

ENGR 15: Dynamics

The application of Newton's Laws to solve 2-D and 3-D static and dynamic problems, particle and rigid body dynamics, freebody diagrams, and equations of motion, with application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems. Computer numerical solution and dynamic response. Prerequisites: Calculus (differentiation and integration) such as Math 19, 20; and ENGR 14 (statics and strength) or a mechanics course in physics such as PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ENGR 40M: An Intro to Making: What is EE

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

ENGR 50M: Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

ENGR 55: Foundational Biology for Engineers (CHEMENG 55)

Biology, physics, and chemistry are the substrates for the modern engineer. Whether you are interested in developing the next generation of medicines or would like the next material or catalyst you design to be inspired by solutions found in Nature, this course will deepen your knowledge of the foundational concepts in biology and enrich your engineering skills. We will introduce the physical principles that underlie the construction and function of living cells, the fundamental building block of life. Emphasis will be on systems, logic, quantitation, and mechanisms of the molecular processes utilized by all life on Earth. This course has no prerequisites, but prior completion of CHEM 31 or equivalent is highly recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, WAY-AQR

ENGR 60: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (CEE 146S)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

ENGR 62X: Introduction to Optimization (Accelerated) (MS&E 111X, MS&E 211X)

Optimization theory and modeling. The role of prices, duality, optimality conditions, and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods, and recent applications in engineering, finance, and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality, and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interior-point, gradient, Newton, and barrier. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
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