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1 - 10 of 62 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 1C: Comics: More than Words (DLCL 238, FILMEDIA 38)

This group seeks to establish a bridge among the different researchers who have worked on Comics from different disciplines and to conduct research on them from a transnational, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary perspective. We consider Comics to have rich traditions and artistic works that have been underexplored and have plenty to contribute to debates on Queer and LGBTQ+ studies, feminist studies, cultural theory, bio-politics, and the relation between fiction and techno-science, among others. By looking at the world from the academically peripheral standpoints of graphic narratives, popular culture, fandom, visual studies, and superheroes, Comics offers a uniquely critical insight into modern societies. nnTo earn the unit, students must attend all events hosted during the quarter, do the readings in advance of the meeting and participate actively in the discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

ENGLISH 1G: The Gothic: Transcultural, Multilingual, and Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Genre

Description: This course is a research platform for the interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of the Gothic literary and cinematic genres. We consider the Gothic to have rich traditions whose contributions to Queer and LGBTQ+ studies, cultural theory, political economy, bio-ethics, and techno-science, remain under-explored. By looking at the world from the peripheralized standpoints of the ¿monstrous,¿ the abject, the dark, the uncanny, and the tumultuous, the Gothic offers unique though often overlooked critical insights into modern societies. Students enrolled in this course will participate in research activities and reading discussions oriented towards crafting interdisciplinary Gothic syllabi for the future and a cross-cultural Encyclopedia of the Gothic.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)

ENGLISH 5I: WISE: Science, Seances, Specters: The Victorian Ghost Story

Ghost stories permeate myth, theater, literature, film, and folklore; they assume many forms and wear many faces, but they endure generation after generation. In this course, we will explore the Victorian ghost story, from Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol to Henry James's The Turn of the Screw. Tracing the parallel evolution of science and spiritualism over the 19th century, we will study the development of the ghost story alongside the fields of psychology, anthropology, forensics, and criminal investigation. We will also draw on feminist thought, queer theory, and cultural studies to explore the role of gender and sexuality in tales of the supernatural and in Victorian notions of mediumship and spectrality. Throughout the quarter we will ask: Why did tales of the unexplainable proliferate during this period, just as tremendous advances in science were making the world more explainable? In what ways were ghost stories gendered for Victorian readers, and why? If ghost stories from d more »
Ghost stories permeate myth, theater, literature, film, and folklore; they assume many forms and wear many faces, but they endure generation after generation. In this course, we will explore the Victorian ghost story, from Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol to Henry James's The Turn of the Screw. Tracing the parallel evolution of science and spiritualism over the 19th century, we will study the development of the ghost story alongside the fields of psychology, anthropology, forensics, and criminal investigation. We will also draw on feminist thought, queer theory, and cultural studies to explore the role of gender and sexuality in tales of the supernatural and in Victorian notions of mediumship and spectrality. Throughout the quarter we will ask: Why did tales of the unexplainable proliferate during this period, just as tremendous advances in science were making the world more explainable? In what ways were ghost stories gendered for Victorian readers, and why? If ghost stories from different time periods represent the fears of different generations, then what were the Victorians afraid of? (Note: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. For enrollment permission contact vbeebe@stanford.edu.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Douris, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 5J: WISE: The Sociology of Literature, Literature as Sociology

In the eyes of Marcel Proust, the modern artist was confronted by two key questions: What is art? And how should an artist be? Historically, for artist and critic both, these questions had been the subject of philosophical debates about Beauty, Truth, and Genius. But in Proust's time, following the rupture introduced by Flaubert half a century earlier, they also became questions about society: Who gets to say what is art and what is not? Whose art is political and whose is 'for its own sake'? Does any art transcend context, or is 'art' always socially constructed? And what kinds of social connections does one need to have to be recognized as an artist? This course explores the growing field of sociological literary criticism, which sees the world of literature not as an abstract space of universal values, but as a kind of social game. Focusing on the novel, and how it operates as a sociological study in miniature, we'll also consider how novels themselves exist as objects or commoditie more »
In the eyes of Marcel Proust, the modern artist was confronted by two key questions: What is art? And how should an artist be? Historically, for artist and critic both, these questions had been the subject of philosophical debates about Beauty, Truth, and Genius. But in Proust's time, following the rupture introduced by Flaubert half a century earlier, they also became questions about society: Who gets to say what is art and what is not? Whose art is political and whose is 'for its own sake'? Does any art transcend context, or is 'art' always socially constructed? And what kinds of social connections does one need to have to be recognized as an artist? This course explores the growing field of sociological literary criticism, which sees the world of literature not as an abstract space of universal values, but as a kind of social game. Focusing on the novel, and how it operates as a sociological study in miniature, we'll also consider how novels themselves exist as objects or commodities that circulate (that gain or lose value) in social space. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu, Gisèle Sapiro, and other pioneers in sociological methods, we will focus on two primary case studies that illuminate the intersection of literature and sociology from reciprocal angles, diving into the world and work of Marcel Proust (whose legendary novel, In Search of Lost Time, can be read as an intensively attentive social study) and engaging with Percival Everett, whose novel Erasure self-consciously thematizes the sociological game of the literary field. (Note: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. For enrollment permission contact vbeebe@stanford.edu.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Libman, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. NOTE: For undergraduates only. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CFS: Fire Stories: Narrative in the Digital Age

How do we tell stories in the age of the internet, social media, and new technology? How has the art of storytelling evolved over time? In this Creative Writing course we will explore storytelling in the digital age. We will be reading and writing in a variety of genres, workshopping our own personal projects, and considering ways in which storytelling has shifted from oral traditions to modern iterations like podcasts, songwriting, filmmaking, and multimedia. Assignments will range from reading Justin Torres' novel, 'We the Animals,' to watching films like 'Birdman' and 'La Jetée.' We will be listening to albums, looking at photo essays, and frequently meeting outdoors to tell stories around a fire. Anyone with a sense of adventure is welcome!
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ENGLISH 9CI: Inspired By Science: A Writing Workshop

How can your interest in science and the environment be enriched by a regular creative practice? How do you begin to write a poem or essay about the wonders of the natural world or the nuances of climate change? What are the tools and strategies available to creative writers, and how can these techniques be used to communicate complex concepts and research to wide-audiences? We begin to answer these questions by drawing inspiration from the rich tradition of scientists who write and writers who integrate science. Emphasizing writing process over finished product, students maintain journals throughout the quarter, responding to daily prompts that encourage both practice and play. Through open-ended and exploratory writing, along with specific exercises to learn the writer¿s craft students develop a sense of their own style and voice. Note: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 10C: Introduction to English I: Tradition and Individuality, Medieval to Early Modern

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to English literature from its beginning in the medieval period to the early seventeenth century. We will study individual literary voices and styles in the context of a growing national tradition. We will discuss major authors (such as Chaucer, More, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Jonson, Donne) and analyze representative literary works in a variety of genres, from the Old English elegy and Middle English lyrics to the Elizabethan sonnet, Renaissance comedy, and the allegorical epic. While the course equips students with specific analytical and interpretative tools necessary for a historical understanding of literature, it is equally committed to revealing the aesthetic interest that medieval and early modern literature still holds for the modern reader.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 12C: Introduction to English III: Modern Literature

Survey of the major trends in literary history from 1850 to the present.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 13Q: Imaginative Realms

This class looks at the tradition of the imagined universe in fiction and poetry. Special topics include magical realism, artificial intelligence, and dystopias. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)
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