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1 - 10 of 40 results for: EARTHSYS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (ESS 38N, GEOLSCI 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 103: Understand Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, once a week required discussion sections, readings and videos, homework assignments, a local energy research report and in-person on-campus field trips. (Off-campus field trips to wind farms, solar farms, nuclear power plants, natural gas power plants, hydroelectric dams, etc. are not being offered this quarter due to COVID - alumni of the course can join field trips in future quarters). Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (Wednesdays, 3:15 - 4:35 PM). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understand-energy. CEE 107S/207S Understand Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter. Students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (ESS 164)

"Everything is somewhere, and that somewhere matters." The rapid growth and maturity of spatial data technologies over the past decade represent a paradigm shift in the applied use of location data from high-level overviews of administrative interests, to highly personalized location-based services that place the individual at the center of the map, at all times. The use of spatial data and related technology continues to grow in fields ranging from environmental sciences to epidemiology to market prediction. This course will present an overview of current approaches to the use of spatial data and its creation, capture, management, analysis and presentation, in a research context. Topics will include modeling of geographic objects and associated data, modeling of geographic space and the conceptual foundations of "spatial thinking," field data collection, basic spatial statistical analysis, remote sensing & the use of satellite-based imagery, "Big Data" and machine learning approaches more »
"Everything is somewhere, and that somewhere matters." The rapid growth and maturity of spatial data technologies over the past decade represent a paradigm shift in the applied use of location data from high-level overviews of administrative interests, to highly personalized location-based services that place the individual at the center of the map, at all times. The use of spatial data and related technology continues to grow in fields ranging from environmental sciences to epidemiology to market prediction. This course will present an overview of current approaches to the use of spatial data and its creation, capture, management, analysis and presentation, in a research context. Topics will include modeling of geographic objects and associated data, modeling of geographic space and the conceptual foundations of "spatial thinking," field data collection, basic spatial statistical analysis, remote sensing & the use of satellite-based imagery, "Big Data" and machine learning approaches to spatial data, and cartographic design and presentation including the use of web-based "Storymap" platforms.n nThe course will consist of weekly lectures, guest speakers, computer lab assignments, midterm and final exam, as well as an individual final project requirement.nnThis course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR

EARTHSYS 146A: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (CEE 161I, CEE 261I, ESS 246A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 147: Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry (BIO 147, BIO 240, EARTHSYS 247)

An introduction to ecosystem ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry. This course will focus on the dynamics of carbon and other biologically essential elements in the Earth System, on spatial scales from local to global. Prerequisites: Biology 117, Earth Systems 111, or graduate standing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Vitousek, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 162: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 262)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

EARTHSYS 179: Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (BIO 179, BIO 279, EARTHSYS 279)

This course explores the science of valuing nature, through two interwoven pathways. One is biophysical, focused on human dependence and impacts on Earths life-support systems. If well managed, lands, waters, and biodiversity yield a flow of vital benefits that sustain and fulfill human life. A wild bee buzzes through a farm, pollinating vegetables as it goes. Nearby, wetlands remove chemicals from the farms runoff, protecting a source of drinking water. In parklands at a cities edge, kids play and adults walk and talk, their exposure to nature promoting physical activity and improved mental health. The trees help maintain a favorable climate, locally and globally. We will develop a framework and practical tools for quantifying this stream of benefits from nature to people.nThe second pathway is social, economic, and philosophical, weaving through concepts of well-being, human development, and conservation and the ethics and effects of their pursuit. We will look back, ahead into the f more »
This course explores the science of valuing nature, through two interwoven pathways. One is biophysical, focused on human dependence and impacts on Earths life-support systems. If well managed, lands, waters, and biodiversity yield a flow of vital benefits that sustain and fulfill human life. A wild bee buzzes through a farm, pollinating vegetables as it goes. Nearby, wetlands remove chemicals from the farms runoff, protecting a source of drinking water. In parklands at a cities edge, kids play and adults walk and talk, their exposure to nature promoting physical activity and improved mental health. The trees help maintain a favorable climate, locally and globally. We will develop a framework and practical tools for quantifying this stream of benefits from nature to people.nThe second pathway is social, economic, and philosophical, weaving through concepts of well-being, human development, and conservation and the ethics and effects of their pursuit. We will look back, ahead into the future, and inward, taking a global view and considering diverse cultural perspectives. Our discussions will be situated in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, movements for racial justice and socioeconomic equity, and efforts to enable people and nature to thrive in cities and countries worldwide.nAll of the science we will explore is in service of decisions. We will dive into real-world examples to see how science can inform why, where, how, and how much people need nature. We will learn the basics of the InVEST tools (for Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) to quantify benefits of nature, the equitability in access to these benefits, and the transformation of policy, finance, management, and practice to sustain and enhance them. nThe course is intended for diverse, advanced students, with interests in research and in moving from science to action for a more just and sustainable world. The instructors aim to provide an enjoyable and productive opportunity to connect remotely and yet with a lot of heart as well as intellectual drive and commitment, bringing empathy, flexibility and hopefully some humor to the day-to-day challenges we are all facing in different difficult ways. Prerequisite: Basic to intermediate GIS (Geographic Information Systems) skills are necessary. We will help with these, but not teach GIS specifically in class. Basic skills include, for example: working with raster, vector and tabular data; loading rasters, shapefiles, and tables into a GIS; changing the symbology of rasters and shapefiles in your chosen GIS; editing raster and shapefile attribute tables; understanding coordinate systems and how to re-project layers; looking at individual raster cell values; and performing basic raster math.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3
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