2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 35 results for: COMM ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMM 1: Introduction to Communication

Our world is being transformed by media technologies that change how we interact with one another and perceived the world around us. These changes are all rooted in communication practices, and their consequences touch on almost all aspects of life. In COMM 1 we will examine the effects of media technologies on psychological life, on industry, and on communities local and global through theorizing and demonstrations and critiques of a wide range of communication products and services.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to COMM majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206. COMM 106 is offered for 5 units, COMM 206 is offered for 4 units.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR

COMM 123: Getting the Picture: Photojournalism in Russia and the U.S. (AMSTUD 123, REES 223, SLAVIC 123, SLAVIC 323)

The vast majority of photographs printed and consumed around the world appeared on the pages of magazines and newspapers. These pictures were almost always heavily edited, presented in carefully devised sequences, and printed alongside text. Through firsthand visual analysis of the picture presses of yesteryear, this course considers the ongoing meaning, circulation, and power of images as they shape a worldview in Russia as well as the US. In looking at points of contact between two world powers, we will cover the works of a wide array of authors, photographers, photojournalists and photographed celebrities (Lev Tolstoy, Margaret Bourke-White, Russian satirists Ilf and Petrov, John Steinbeck and Richard Capa, and many others). We will explore the relationship between photojournalistic practice of the past with that of our present, from the printed page to digital media, as well as the ethical quandaries posed by the camera¿s intervention into/shaping of modern history. No knowledge of Russian is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-A-II

COMM 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (AMSTUD 125, COMM 225)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225. COMM 125 is offered for 5 units, COMM 225 is offered for 4 units.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci

COMM 138: Deliberative Democracy Practicum: Applying Deliberative Polling (COMM 238)

In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will learn and apply quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in rese more »
In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will learn and apply quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in deliberative democracy, community and stakeholder engagement, and the practical aspects of working in local communities. This practicum is a collaboration between the Center for Deliberative Democracy and the Haas Center for Public Service. CDD website: http://cdd.stanford.edu; Hass Center website: https://haas.stanford.edu. This hybrid course meets at the Donald Kennedy Room at the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-AQR | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

COMM 159: Which Side of History? How Technology Is Reshaping Democracy and Our Lives (EDUC 159)

Technology, with its 24/7 influence on our lives, has transformed our entire society. This course, led by James Steyer, founder and CEO of Common Sense Media, will examine a number of critical issues: How can we hold tech platforms accountable? How do we protect the privacy of consumers? How can we ensure the mental health of our society? Guest speakers-including Hillary Clinton, Cory Booker, Sacha Baron Cohen, Reid Hoffman, and Julie Lythcott-Haims-will bring a unique perspective on the remarkable impact of technology on our lives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Steyer, J. (PI)

COMM 166: Virtual People (COMM 266)

(Graduate students register for COMM 266. COMM 166 is offered for 5 units, COMM 266 is offered for 4 units.) The concept of virtual people or digital human representations; methods of constructing and using virtual people; methodological approaches to interactions with and among virtual people; and current applications. Viewpoints including popular culture, literature, film, engineering, behavioral science, computer science, and communication. Note for PhD students in programs other than Communication: instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 177B: Big Local Journalism: a project-based class (COMM 277B)

( COMM 177B is offered for 5 units, COMM 277B is offered for 4 units.) This class will tackle data-driven journalism, in collaboration with other academic and journalistic partners. The class is centered around one or more projects rooted in local data-driven journalism but with potential for regional or national journalistic stories and impact. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to negotiate for public records and data, analyze data and report out stories. Some of the work may be published by news organizations or may be used to advance data journalism projects focused on public accountability. Students will gain valuable knowledge and skills in how to negotiate for public records, how to critically analyze data for journalistic purpose and build out reporting and writing skills. Students with a background in journalism (especially data journalism), statistics, computer science, law, or public policy are encouraged to participate. Enrollment is limited. May be repeated for credit. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 177E: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Telling True Stories (COMM 277E)

( COMM 177E is offered for 5 units, COMM 277E is offered for 4 units.) Whether covering news, culture or sports, journalism feature writers combine factual reporting with vivid storytelling in a variety of forms -- from profiles to essays to narratives. In a course designed as a writer's workshop, students will learn to think, report and write in scenes; to write from the point of view of one or more subjects; to report with a heightened sense of observation; and to focus on the most telling details in a story. Prerequisite: COMM 104W or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Brenner, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints