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1 - 10 of 41 results for: CHEMENG ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CHEMENG 55: Foundational Biology for Engineers (ENGR 55)

Biology, physics, and chemistry are the substrates for the modern engineer. Whether you are interested in developing the next generation of medicines or would like the next material or catalyst you design to be inspired by solutions found in Nature, this course will deepen your knowledge of the foundational concepts in biology and enrich your engineering skills. We will introduce the physical principles that underlie the construction and function of living cells, the fundamental building block of life. Emphasis will be on systems, logic, quantitation, and mechanisms of the molecular processes utilized by all life on Earth. This course has no prerequisites, but prior completion of CHEM 31 or equivalent is highly recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

CHEMENG 90Q: Dare to Care: Compassionate Design

Imagine yourself with your abundant creativity, intellect, and passion, but your ability to move or speak is diminished. How would you face the world, how would you thrive at Stanford, how would you relay to people your ideas and creations? How would you share yourself and your ideas with the world? nThere are more than 50 million individuals in America with at least one disability, and in the current world of design, these differences are often overlooked. How do we as designers empower people of diverse physical abilities and provide them with means of self-expression?nnIn Compassionate Design, students from any prospective major are invited to explore the engineering design process by examining the needs of persons with disabilities. Through invited guests, students will have the opportunity to directly engage people with different types of disabilities as a foundation to design products that address problems of motion and mobility, vision, speech and hearing. For example, in class, more »
Imagine yourself with your abundant creativity, intellect, and passion, but your ability to move or speak is diminished. How would you face the world, how would you thrive at Stanford, how would you relay to people your ideas and creations? How would you share yourself and your ideas with the world? nThere are more than 50 million individuals in America with at least one disability, and in the current world of design, these differences are often overlooked. How do we as designers empower people of diverse physical abilities and provide them with means of self-expression?nnIn Compassionate Design, students from any prospective major are invited to explore the engineering design process by examining the needs of persons with disabilities. Through invited guests, students will have the opportunity to directly engage people with different types of disabilities as a foundation to design products that address problems of motion and mobility, vision, speech and hearing. For example, in class, students will interview people who are deaf, blind, have cerebral palsy, or other disabling conditions. Students will then be asked, using the design tools they have been exposed to as part of the seminar, to create a particular component or device that enhances the quality of life for that user or users with similar limitations.nnPresentation skills are taught and emphasized as students will convey their designs to the class and instructors. Students will complete this seminar with a compassionate view toward design for the disabled, they will acquire a set of design tools that they can use to empower themselves and others in whatever direction they choose to go, and they will have increased confidence and abilities in presenting in front of an audience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Moalli, J. (PI)

CHEMENG 100: Chemical Process Modeling, Dynamics, and Control

Mathematical methods applied to engineering problems using chemical engineering examples. The development of mathematical models to describe chemical process dynamic behavior. Analytical and computer simulation techniques for the solution of ordinary differential equations. Dynamic behavior of linear first- and second-order systems. Introduction to process control. Dynamics and stability of controlled systems. Prerequisites: CHEMENG 20 or ENGR 20; CME 102 or MATH 53.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHEMENG 110A: Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics of single-component systems: laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties, equations of state, properties of ideal and real fluids, phase transitions and phase equilibrium, design of thermodynamic processes including refrigeration and power cycles. This course is intended for undergraduate sophomores and juniors in engineering and/or the chemical sciences; first-year students require consent of instructor. Pre-/Corequisites: CHEM 33, PHYS 41, MATH 51 or CME 100.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHEMENG 130B: Introduction to kinetics and reactor design

Introduction to kinetics and reactor design. Identification and comparison of different reactors. Application of rate laws, pseudo steady-state, quasi-equilibrium, and other non-reactive components to develop mathematical models describing different types of reactor systems. Analysis of reaction kinetics in the context of reactor design, and determination of rate laws and reaction mechanisms. Assessment and troubleshooting of reactors by identifying sources of deviations. Application of concepts of reactor design to questions in different fields such as ecology and epidemiology. Prerequisites: 130A or equivalent
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHEMENG 150: Biochemical Engineering (BIOE 150, CHEMENG 250)

Combines biological knowledge and methods with quantitative engineering principles. Quantitative review of biochemistry and metabolism as well as recombinant DNA technology and synthetic biology (metabolic engineering). The course begins with a review of basic cell biology, proceeds to bioprocess design and development, and ends with applied synthetic biology methods and examples. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 181 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHEMENG 174: Environmental Microbiology I (BIO 273A, CEE 274A, CHEMENG 274)

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33, CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35), and BIOSCI 83, CHEMENG 181, or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Spormann, A. (PI)

CHEMENG 180: Chemical Engineering Plant Design

Open to seniors in chemical engineering or by consent of instructor. Application of chemical engineering principles to the design of practical plants for the manufacture of chemicals and related materials. Topics: flow-sheet development from a conceptual design, equipment design for distillation, chemical reactions, heat transfer, pumping, and compression; estimation of capital expenditures and production costs; plant construction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

CHEMENG 181: Biochemistry I (CHEM 181, CHEMENG 281)

Structure and function of major classes of biomolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Mechanistic analysis of properties of proteins including catalysis, signal transduction and membrane transport. Students will also learn to critically analyze data from the primary biochemical literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisites: Chem 121.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Dassama, L. (PI)

CHEMENG 189: Career Building: Entrepreneurship / Intrapreneurship, People, Innovation, Decision-Making and Impact (CHEMENG 289)

This course is designed to enable graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in science and engineering to hone strategies for career success. Drawing strongly on entrepreneurial principles and lessons from industry, the course complements the traditional curriculum by focusing on career-building tools that students need to improve their professional prospects and achieve their goals. Relevant for those who plan to pursue careers in academia and industry alike, a central focus will be on managing one's career as if it were a start-up, emphasizing principles that empower individuals to take more control of their futures: investing in yourself, building professional networks, taking intelligent risks, and making uncertainty and volatility work to one's advantage. Through a series of in-classroom presentations and interviews - with professors, entrepreneurs, executives, athletes, investors, and thought leaders from diverse fields and sectors - students will gain important knowl more »
This course is designed to enable graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in science and engineering to hone strategies for career success. Drawing strongly on entrepreneurial principles and lessons from industry, the course complements the traditional curriculum by focusing on career-building tools that students need to improve their professional prospects and achieve their goals. Relevant for those who plan to pursue careers in academia and industry alike, a central focus will be on managing one's career as if it were a start-up, emphasizing principles that empower individuals to take more control of their futures: investing in yourself, building professional networks, taking intelligent risks, and making uncertainty and volatility work to one's advantage. Through a series of in-classroom presentations and interviews - with professors, entrepreneurs, executives, athletes, investors, and thought leaders from diverse fields and sectors - students will gain important knowledge and practical strategies, with course modules on topics such as ideation and innovation, the skill of self-advocacy, the fundamentals of negotiation, building and managing teams, and effective communication and storytelling. Additional modules will focus on biotechnology and deep tech start-up companies, as well as strategies for cultivating a successful academic career. nnThe idea for this course emerged from the instructor's reflections on 30 years of research, teaching, mentorship, and deep entrepreneurial experiences spanning the gamut of approaches to translational science - academic discovery, invention, conceiving of and leading multi-institutional research centers, building research and business teams, launching and financing start-ups, building business models to advance real-world applications of cutting-edge science, and seeing through research-based companies to success (including growing an idea into a multi-billion dollar company). For this course, students will be expected to complete relevant reading assignments, participate actively in class dialogue, and complete regular writing assignments focused on course topics as they relate to one¿s own career-building needs and professional aspirations. Students may also have opportunities to lead class discussions on topics of interest.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3
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