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1 - 10 of 27 results for: AFRICAAM ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: Music 19, consent of instructor, or satisfactory demonstration of basic musical skills proficiency on qualifying examination on first day of class. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 28: Health Impact of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse across the Lifecourse (FEMGEN 237, HUMBIO 28, SOMGEN 237)

(Human Biology students must enroll in HUMBIO 28 or AFRICAAM 28. Med/Grad students should enroll in SOMGEN 237 for 1-3 units.) An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units.To receive a letter grade in any listing, students must enroll for 3 units. This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 37: Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads Performance Project (DANCE 30)

An interdisciplinary project-based class to develop dance technique, collaborative choreography, and associated visual and musical arts. We invite dancers, movers, and emerging creators of all styles and backgrounds. The Autumn 21-22 project theme will be Chocolate Heads at the Cantor: Dance, Upcycled Fashion, and the Cinematic Eye. The Chocolate Heads will continue the practice of creating intermedia events using dance, film projection on bodies and surfaces, live DJ, vocals, and runway presentation. This site-specific dance performance will feature upcycled costumes co-constructed by the students under the designer's supervision. Students chosen to participate will engage in interrelated choreographic and art-making collaborations which address street performance, fashion ecologies, and social platforms. To be presented Feb. 2022 at the Cantor Art Center, we will reimagine the runway space as an arena for collective moving performance, while modeling ways of being that are body positive, transcultural, and gender expansive. All levels of experience are welcome. Week 1: TU 9/21--Introduction to project, creative team & CHs Band; THU 9/23--1st Audition Workshop. Contact Instructor (Aleta Hayes ahayes1@stanford.edu) for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 53S: Black San Francisco (HISTORY 53S)

For over a century African-Americans have shaped the contours of San Francisco, a globally recognized metropolis, but their histories remain hidden. While endangered, Black San Francisco is still very much alive, and its history is an inextricable piece of the city's social and cultural fabric. This course aims to uncover the often-overlooked history of African-Americans in the city of San Francisco. The history of Black San Francisco unravels the myth of San Francisco liberalism showing how systemic racial oppression greatly limited the social mobility of non-whites well into the 20th century. Conversely, this course will also highlight the rich cultural and artistic legacies of Black San Franciscans with special attention on their ability to create social. Starting with the small, but influential middle and upper classes of African-Americans, who supported abolitionism from the West in the mid-late nineteenth century, to the rapid growth of the black population during WWII and moving more »
For over a century African-Americans have shaped the contours of San Francisco, a globally recognized metropolis, but their histories remain hidden. While endangered, Black San Francisco is still very much alive, and its history is an inextricable piece of the city's social and cultural fabric. This course aims to uncover the often-overlooked history of African-Americans in the city of San Francisco. The history of Black San Francisco unravels the myth of San Francisco liberalism showing how systemic racial oppression greatly limited the social mobility of non-whites well into the 20th century. Conversely, this course will also highlight the rich cultural and artistic legacies of Black San Franciscans with special attention on their ability to create social. Starting with the small, but influential middle and upper classes of African-Americans, who supported abolitionism from the West in the mid-late nineteenth century, to the rapid growth of the black population during WWII and moving through post-war struggles against the forces of Jim Crow and environmental racism. This course will explore: What is Black San Francisco? How did African-Americans shape the culture and politics of San Francisco, and where does the history of Black San Francisco fit into the broader national historical narrative? Conversely, what is unique about San Francisco and similar black communities in the West? How do we reconstruct the past of people going South to West as opposed to South to North? And finally, as raised in the critically acclaimed 2019 film, The Last Black Man in San Francisco and eluded by the late Dr. Martin Luther King, where does black San Franciscans, go from here?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 69: Black Studies Matter (AFRICAAM 269)

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to ten foundational texts in Black Studies, including classic works by Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, C. L. R. James, W. E. B. DuBois, and Audre Lorde. The discussions will connect these texts to contemporary conversations about Black feminism, Black politics, mass incarceration, policing, and Black life in America in the twenty-first century. We welcome a wide range of students to enroll in this class: undergraduates and graduate students and members of the larger Stanford community who would like to gain a deeper understanding of Black Studies. This class is particularly urgent in our current moment. Taken together, the selected readings will provide critical historical and cultural context to grasp the meanings of our own tumultuous times. n nThis course draws on primary sources that reveal the centrality of Black Studies to understanding our world and the major themes that animate our lives: history, identity, more »
This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to ten foundational texts in Black Studies, including classic works by Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, C. L. R. James, W. E. B. DuBois, and Audre Lorde. The discussions will connect these texts to contemporary conversations about Black feminism, Black politics, mass incarceration, policing, and Black life in America in the twenty-first century. We welcome a wide range of students to enroll in this class: undergraduates and graduate students and members of the larger Stanford community who would like to gain a deeper understanding of Black Studies. This class is particularly urgent in our current moment. Taken together, the selected readings will provide critical historical and cultural context to grasp the meanings of our own tumultuous times. n nThis course draws on primary sources that reveal the centrality of Black Studies to understanding our world and the major themes that animate our lives: history, identity, memory, gender, sexuality, belonging, exclusion, and the varied responses and forms of resistance to four hundred years of racial oppression. These texts invite students to delve deeply into the lived experiences of African Americans across time periods, class positions, sexual orientations, and geographic locations. The lectures and discussions are led by faculty in African and African American Studies (AAAS), Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE), History, Theater and Performance Studies, English, and Philosophy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 93: Research Methods in Africana Studies (AFRICAAM 293)

This course introduces research methodologies in Africana Studies. Under the guidance of the Research Fellow in the African and African American Studies Program, students will study the methods that Africana scholars, artists, and activists employ to design and execute research on Africana phenomena. The class will include lectures, close readings of texts, research assignments, and lively discussions. The course materials will feature both foundational and contemporary texts in the field of Black Studies. Our engagement with Africana research methodologies will pose critical questions about interdisciplinary research and cross-disciplinary perspectives with careful attention to intersectionality, cultural competence, and ethics in research. The class will also discuss how Africana thinkers challenge conventional modes of knowledge production and, in so doing, offer critiques and contributions that advance the methodologies of related disciplines. Students will leave the course better prepared to take on the senior thesis capstone project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

AFRICAAM 105: Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies

This course situates the study of Black lives, known interchangeably as African American Studies, Black Studies, Africana Studies, or African Diaspora Studies, within the context of ongoing struggles against anti-Black racism. We will explore the founding principles and purposes of the field, the evolution of its imperatives, its key debates, and the lives and missions of its progenitors and practitioners. In doing so we will survey, broadly and deeply, the diverse historical, political, social, cultural, and economic experiences and expressions of the African Diaspora.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 112B: African Literature: From Chinua Achebe to Afrofuturism (ENGLISH 112B)

This course will be an exploration of the major writers and diverse literary traditions of the African continent. We will examine various elements (genre, form, orality, etc.) across a variety of political, social, and literary categories (colonial/postcolonial, modernism/postmodernism, gender, class, literary history, religion, etc.). We will also address issues such as African literature and its relationship to world literature and the question of language and of translation. Writers to be discussed will include Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Fiston Mwanza Mujila, Kamel Daoud, Tayeb Salih, and NoViolet Bulawayo, among others.nThe class will be structured around the close-reading of passages from individual texts with an attempt to relate the details derived from the reading process to larger areas of significance within the field. Students should make sure to bring their texts to class with them and must be prepared to contribute to class discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 160J: Conjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic (CSRE 160J, DANCE 160J)

Conjure Art is a movement and embodied practice course looking at the work and techniques of artists of color who utilize spirituality and ritual practices in their art making and performance work to evoke social change. In this course we will discuss the work of artists who bring spiritual ritual in their art making while addressing issues of spiritual accountability and cultural appropriation. Throughout the quarter we will welcome guest artists who make work along these lines, while exploring movement, writing, singing and visual art making. This class will culminate in a performance ritual co-created by students and instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)
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