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221 - 230 of 329 results for: all courses

OSPSANTG 119X: The Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies

The Chilean economy in five stages, taking into account: the international economic position of Chile; internal economic structures closely related to the inherited historical conditions and to the changing international economic position of the country; and the economic strategies prevalent during the period and the concrete development policies conducted by government authorities.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Luders, R. (PI)

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

PHIL 99: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 35, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

PHIL 175A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER

POLISCI 25N: The US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective

This course traces the development of legislatures from their medieval European origins to the present, with primary emphasis on the case of the U.S. Congress. Students will learn about the early role played by assemblies in placing limits on royal power, especially via the power of the purse. About half the course will then turn to a more detailed consideration of the U.S. Congress's contemporary performance, analyzing how that performance is affected by procedural legacies from the past that affect most democratic legislatures worldwide.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 46N: Contemporary African Politics

Africa has lagged behind the rest of the developing world in terms of three consequential outcomes: economic development, the establishment of social order through effective governance, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and to examine recent examples of success pointing to a more hopeful future. Students will be asked to develop expertise on one or two African countries and report regularly to fellow students on the progress (or lack thereof) of their countries on each outcome and the reasons for it.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Laitin, D. (PI)

POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

The course provides an introduction to major factors shaping contemporary international politics, including the distribution of power among states, ideas, and domestic regimes. The course will explore the causes of the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, the impact of nuclear weapons, the rise of China, and external state building.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

POLISCI 101Z: Introduction to International Relations (INTNLREL 101Z)

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci

POLISCI 102: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (AMSTUD 123X, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

This is a course about American politics, which means this is a course about individuals, identities, and institutions. How do Americans come to think andnreason about politics? What is the role that identities play in affecting the political judgments that individuals make? How do our political institutionsnrespond to the demands of a diverse public that disagrees about issues related to race and justice, income and wealth inequality, climate change, gunncontrol, reproductive rights, the power of the executive, and the role that government ought to play in the lives of the governed? And how do we makensense of this seemingly peculiar contemporary moment in American politics? These are not easy questions, but they are ones for which political sciencenprovides a useful foundation to guide our inquiry. The objective of this course is to introduce students to various concepts and theoretical frameworks thatnhelp us understand the messiness and complexity of American politics. In addition to classroom lectures and discussion sections, students will benrequired to apply concepts and theoretical frameworks to contemporary issues in American politics. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for 5 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 104: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Why are some countries prone to civil war and violence, while others remain peaceful? Why do some countries maintain democratic systems, while others do not? Why are some countries more prosperous than others? This course will provide an overview of the most basic questions in the comparative study of political systems, and will introduce the analytical tools that can help us answer them.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
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