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61 - 70 of 286 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CSRE 363: Race in Greco-Roman Antiquity (CLASSICS 363)

This course will investigate representations of black people in ancient Greek and Roman antiquity. In addition to interrogating the conflation of the terms "race" and "blackness" as it applies to this time period, students will learn how to critique the interference of racial ideologies in modern scholarship, and they will cross-examine the role that race and cultural imperialism have played in the formation of the current discipline of Classics. Students will be invited to incorporate materials that they deem crucial into this discussion of skin color in Greco-Roman antiquity. Therefore, this course will benefit greatly from those with a broad spectrum of interests related to this topic.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Derbew, S. (PI)

CSRE 364A: Race and Performance (AFRICAAM 164A, CSRE 164A, TAPS 164)

How does race function in performance and dare we say ¿live and in living color?¿ How does one deconstruct discrimination at its roots?n nFrom a perspective of global solidarity and recognition of shared plight among BIPOC communities, we will read and perform plays that represent material and psychological conditions under a common supremacist regime. Where and when possible, we will host a member of the creative team of some plays in our class for a live discussion. Assigned materials include works by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Amiri Baraka, Young Jean Lee, Ayad Akhtar, Susan Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Betty Shamieh, Jeremy O. Harris, and Christopher Demos Brown.n nThis class offers undergraduate students a discussion that does not center whiteness, but takes power, history, culture, philosophy, and hierarchy as core points of debate. In the first two weeks, we will establish the common terms of the discussion about stereotypes, representation, and historical claims, but then we will qu more »
How does race function in performance and dare we say ¿live and in living color?¿ How does one deconstruct discrimination at its roots?n nFrom a perspective of global solidarity and recognition of shared plight among BIPOC communities, we will read and perform plays that represent material and psychological conditions under a common supremacist regime. Where and when possible, we will host a member of the creative team of some plays in our class for a live discussion. Assigned materials include works by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Amiri Baraka, Young Jean Lee, Ayad Akhtar, Susan Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Betty Shamieh, Jeremy O. Harris, and Christopher Demos Brown.n nThis class offers undergraduate students a discussion that does not center whiteness, but takes power, history, culture, philosophy, and hierarchy as core points of debate. In the first two weeks, we will establish the common terms of the discussion about stereotypes, representation, and historical claims, but then we will quickly move toward an advanced conversation about effective discourse and activism through art, performance, and cultural production. In this class, we assume that colonialism, slavery, white supremacy, and oppressive contemporary state apparatuses are real, undeniable, and manifest. Since our starting point is clear, our central question is not about recognizing or delineating the issues, but rather, it is a debate about how to identify the target of our criticism in order to counter oppression effectively and dismantle long-standing structures.n nNot all BIPOC communities are represented in this syllabus, as such claim of inclusion in a single quarter would be tokenistic and disingenuous. Instead, we will aspire to understand and negotiate some of the complexities related to race in several communities locally in the U.S. and beyond.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

CSRE 371: Representation: Race, Law, and Politics (PHIL 371W)

Graduate seminar. In this course, we will work together to develop a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the concept(s) of political representation. We will do so by examining a number of historical and contemporary theories of political representation developed within philosophy and cognate fields. 2 unit option only for Phil PhDs beyond the second year.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Salkin, W. (PI)

CSRE 385: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Pedagogical Possibilities (AFRICAAM 389C, EDUC 389C)

This seminar explores the intersections of language and race/racism/racialization in the public schooling experiences of students of color. We will briefly trace the historical emergence of the related fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology, explore how each of these scholarly traditions approaches the study of language, and identify key points of overlap and tension between the two fields before considering recent examples of inter-disciplinary scholarship on language and race in urban schools. Issues to be addressed include language variation and change, language and identity, bilingualism and multilingualism, language ideologies, and classroom discourse. We will pay particular attention to the implications of relevant literature for teaching and learning in urban classrooms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Banks, A. (PI)

CSRE 393: The Art of Punk: Sound, Aesthetics and Performance (ARTHIST 493)

This seminar explores the sonic and visual aesthetics of punk rock since the 1970s. While studying music, videos, zines, and album covers, students will examine the convergence of art with politics among artists, such as Lydia Lunch, Vaginal Davis, and Shizu Saldamando, and bands, including Crass, the Plasmatics, and Los Illegals, as well as punk subgenres, like No Wave, Riot Grrrl, and Queercore. Likewise, students will consider how issues of identity, race, gender and sexuality informed artists and their work.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

CTL 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (ENGR 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

DESINST 205: Art as Activism (AFRICAAM 205)

Art is a form of revolution and reflection. From literary and performing arts to murals and large scale conceptual sculptures- artists have often created a pathway for society to engage in a dialogue on the complicated nuances of social justice issues around the globe. Especially in 2020, we are grappling globally with a myriad of inequities and limited spaces to reflect, engage and act on them - this course will give interested students the opportunity to learn from revolutionary artists, reflect on their own role as designers/students in society and agency to build their own spaces for creating dialogue. nnAdmission by application. Visit dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

DESINST 240: Designing Machine Learning: A Multidisciplinary Approach

As machine learning makes its way into all kinds of products, systems, spaces, and experiences, we need to train a new generation of creators to harness the potential of machine learning and also to understand its implications. This class invites a mix of designers, data scientists, engineers, business people, and diverse professionals of all backgrounds to help create a multi-disciplinary environment for collaboration. Through a mixture of hands-on guided investigations and design projects, students will learn to design systems of machine learning that create lasting value within their human contexts and environments. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

DESINST 280: Designing Equity Tools (AFRICAAM 280)

Education systems in this country are not serving all students equally. This course is for students who wish to revolutionize the way we understand and provide for safe learning environments. In this course, students and instructors will explore opportunities for increasing equity in education by working with a diverse array of real world experts and completing design challenges that have the potential to positively impact the lives of students in this country. nnApplication required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2

DESINST 423: Design for Healthy Behavior Change

In the U.S., 75% of medical expenditures are for illnesses that are predominantly lifestyle related such as type 2 diabetes, arthritis and heart disease. It has been shown as people modify their lifestyles with healthier habits, medical problems can be reduced or avoided and a healthier and happier life achieved. The class employs design thinking in teams while working directly with volunteers in the community to help them achieve their health goals. There is an individual project and a team project each with multiple milestones. Learn and experience the design thinking process through interactions and design working within student teams and working directly with patient-volunteers from the practice of Drs. Ann Lindsay and Alan Glaseroff from the Stanford Coordinated Care Clinic. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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