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651 - 660 of 695 results for: all courses

SLAVIC 190: Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Thought (COMPLIT 190, COMPLIT 390, SLAVIC 390)

Anna Karenina, the novel as a case study in the contest between "modernity" and "tradition," their ethical order, ideology, cultural codes, and philosophies. Images of society, women and men in Tolstoy v. those of his contemporaries: Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, Weber, Durkheim, Freud. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. Requirements: three interpretive essays (500-1000 words each). Analysis of a passage from the novel; AK refracted through a "philosophical" prism and vice versa (30% each); class discussion and Forum (10%).
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

SLAVIC 194: Russia: Literature, Film, Identity, Alterity (SLAVIC 394)

How do Russian literature and film imagine Russian identity ¿ and, in contrast, the ethnic or national Other? Does political and literary theory analyzing national identity and the literary imagination elsewhere hold true in the Russian context? Texts include works by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Blok, Mayakovsky, Platonov; Soviet and post-Soviet films; theory and history. Recommended for returnees from Moscow, Slavic majors, and CREEES MA students. Accepted for IR credit. Readings in English and films subtitled; additional section for Russian readers. Taught in English.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

SLAVIC 200: Proseminar in Literary Theory and Study of Russian Literature

Introduction to advance study of Russian literature and culture: profession, discipline, theoretical perspectives. Variety of approaches, from semiological to psychoanalytic, phenomenological, historical, and sociological; practical exercises in the analysis of verse, narrative, and visual representation in literature and art. Three short essays (800 words) and a review of a recent monograph on Russian literature and culture. Required for graduate students and honors seniors in Russian; first-year graduate students must enroll during their first quarter. Prerequisites: Knowledge of Russian language and literature
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

SLAVIC 242: Artists and Power: Eastern European Literature and Film from 1945 to 1991

During the Cold War, the highly diverse region of Eastern Europe was largely united by a common political allegiance to the USSR. The oppressive politics of the Eastern Bloc regimes meant that artists were frequently compelled to respond to political pressure in their works. This situation has been interpreted according to the logic of the Cold War: artists were either courageous dissidents who opposed the regime or brainwashed conformists. In this course we will consider examples that conform to this frame--literature and film of political reform as well as models of Socialist Realism. In addition, however, we will also consider works of self-reflection, escapism, and every-day life under Socialism, in order to arrive at a more complete understanding of the cultural history of the era. The course will include literature and film produced by artists from Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, the Soviet Union, and Yugoslavia. All readings will be in English.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

SLE 91: Structured Liberal Education

Three quarter sequence; restricted to and required of SLE students. Comprehensive study of the intellectual foundations of the western tradition in dialogue with eastern, indigenous, and postcolonial perspectives. The cultural foundations of western civilization in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Middle East, with attention to Buddhist and Hindu counterparts and the questions these traditions address in common. Texts and authors include Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Greek tragedy, Sappho, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, Saint Augustine, and texts from Hindu and Buddhist traditions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 8 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:IHUM-1, THINK, WAY-A-II, Writing SLE

SLE 92: Structured Liberal Education

Three quarter sequence; restricted to and required of SLE students. Comprehensive study of the intellectual foundations of the western tradition in dialogue with eastern, indigenous, and postcolonial perspectives. The foundations of the modern world, from late antiquity through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Scientific Revolution. Authors include Dante, Descartes, Shakespeare, and texts from Chinese and Islamic traditions.
Terms: Win | Units: 8 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:IHUM-2, THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER, Writing SLE

STS 1: The Public Life of Science and Technology

Focus on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments through STS interdisciplinary lens that encompasses historical dimensions (e.g., legacy of scientific revolution); technological impact (e.g., affordances of new tools and media); economic and management aspects (e.g., business models, design and engineering strategies); legal and ethical elements (e.g., intellectual property, social justice); and societal response and participation (e.g., media coverage, forms of activism). Discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

STS 200D: Text Technologies: A History (ENGLISH 184H)

Beginning with cave painting, carving, cuneiform, hieroglyph, and other early textual innovations, survey of the history of writing, image, sound, and byte, all text technologies employed to create, communicate and commemorate. Focus on the recording of language, remembrance and ideas explicating significant themes seen throughout history; these include censorship, propaganda, authenticity, apocalypticism, technophobia, reader response, democratization and authority. The production, transmission and reception of tablet technology, the scroll, the manuscript codex and handmade book, the machine-made book, newspapers and ephemera; and investigate the emergence of the phonograph and photograph, film, radio, television and digital multimedia.The impact of these various text technologies on their users, and try to draw out similarities and differences in our cultural and intellectual responses to evolving technologies. STS majors must have senior status to enroll in this senior capstone course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

STS 200E: Technology, Nature, and Environmentalism

Humans have long shaped and reshaped the natural world with technologies. Once a menacing presence to conquer or an infinite reserve for resources, nature is now understood to require constant protection from damage and loss. Humanity's relationships with the environment have changed over time and differed across societies. In this course, students (1) explore diverse ways in which people in different historical and cultural settings have conceptualized nature and their relationships with it, with a focus on the role of technology; and (2) learn the basics of STS research and conduct an original study that addresses this human-nature-technology nexus. First class attendance mandatory. STS majors must have senior status to enroll in this senior capstone course.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

TAPS 1: Introduction to Theater and Performance Studies

What brings together a contemporary company such as Google and an experimental theater such as The Wooster Group? What sets them apart? Approaching theater as presentational form of organization, this class shifts study of theater from the context of literature to that of performance. It offers an overview of performance across disciplines: from theater and other performing arts, to law, management, sports, and new technologies. In this interdisciplinary exploration, performance emerges as a model that cuts across diverse branches of contemporary culture, from sports events, to social dances, to political protests, to the organization of a workplace. It is designed to serve students who may go on to major or minor in Theater and Performance Studies including the Dance division and also students for whom this knowledge is a general contribution to their liberal arts education or to their own field of study. It integrates scholarly research and practical use of performance. No previous performing arts training or skills are required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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