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51 - 60 of 179 results for: PSYCH

PSYCH 140S: Do I Belong Here? How to Use Social Psychology to Build Belonging

This course will provide students with a theoretical and applied understanding of the challenges, barriers, and solutions for how to cultivate belonging in educational and professional contexts from a social psychological perspective. The course will pull from core findings in social psychology, sociology, and organizational behavior to scaffold the student's holistic understanding of belonging. We will then highlight research such as intergroup relations, attribution ambiguity, and mindsets that illustrates the antecedents and consequences of threats to belonging. Finally, the course will demonstrate how we can utilize 'wise interventions' in real-world settings to foster belonging by creating change at the individual, institutional, and policy level. The course, overall, will attempt to educate students about how people understand themselves, their situations, and how they understand themselves in those situations, and equip them with data-driven strategies to build and create more inclusive and diverse spaces.

PSYCH 141: Cognitive Development

How do humans think, learn, and communicate? What are the developmental roots of these capacities, and what makes young children such remarkable learners? This course aims to offer an understanding of how human cognition - the ability to think, reason, and learn about the world - changes in the first few years of life. We will review and evaluate both classic findings and state-of-the-art research on cognitive development and understand the logic behind the scientific methods for studying cognition in young children. By the end of the course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the major theoretical accounts of intellectual growth as well as the key empirical findings that support (or refute) these accounts, understand the basic logic of scientific methods in cognitive development research, and be able to discuss implications of cognitive development research on real-world issues in education and social policy. PSYCH141 is an Area A course for 2019-2020. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1. Recommended: PSYCH 60
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 141S: The Psychology of Health: Culture, Self, and Society

What is health? How does someone become healthy or maintain good health? In the US, mainstream narratives about health tend to focus on individual choices and behavior. In this course, we take a broader focus, examining how individual health is shaped by social interactions (e.g., with family, friends, doctors), institutions (e.g., media, policy, advertising), and broad cultural ideas and values (e.g., personal responsibility, independence). Drawing from psychological research, we will examine topics at the intersection of self and society, including: the role of stress, stigma and blame in shaping health and wellbeing, cultural processes contributing to health disparities, attitudes about the proper role of government in shaping public health, and the erosion of trust in medical authority (e.g. anti-vaccination attitudes). We will also consider how race, gender, and socioeconomic status impact health outcomes. Throughout the course, we will analyze cultural products including advertis more »
What is health? How does someone become healthy or maintain good health? In the US, mainstream narratives about health tend to focus on individual choices and behavior. In this course, we take a broader focus, examining how individual health is shaped by social interactions (e.g., with family, friends, doctors), institutions (e.g., media, policy, advertising), and broad cultural ideas and values (e.g., personal responsibility, independence). Drawing from psychological research, we will examine topics at the intersection of self and society, including: the role of stress, stigma and blame in shaping health and wellbeing, cultural processes contributing to health disparities, attitudes about the proper role of government in shaping public health, and the erosion of trust in medical authority (e.g. anti-vaccination attitudes). We will also consider how race, gender, and socioeconomic status impact health outcomes. Throughout the course, we will analyze cultural products including advertisements, media stories, health PSAs, and government statements to better understand the transmission of cultural ideas of health. Finally, we will discuss various opportunities and barriers to creating social and cultural change regarding health. The course will empower students learn to recognize and analyze the influence of culture on everyday functioning and apply that understanding to improving their own and other people's health outcomes.
Last offered: Summer 2019

PSYCH 142A: Special Topics in Adolescent Mental Health (HUMBIO 142M)

Includes the study of aspects of common disorders seen in adolescent populations, such as prevalence, developmental course, gender differences, theoretical explanations, and therapeutic interventions. Topics will include mood/anxiety disorders, eating disorders, learning disabilities and ADHD, sexual risk behaviors, developmental disorders, substance abuse, and self-harm. Goals of this course include getting students to think critically about the unique mental health needs of adolescents, collaborating on devising ways to improve the way our society meets those needs, and strengthening writing and communication skills applicable to this area of inquiry. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Medoff, L. (PI)

PSYCH 145: Seminar on Infant Development

For students preparing honors research. Conceptual and methodological issues related to research on developmental psycholinguistics; training in experimental design; and collection, analysis, and interpretation of data.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Repeatable for credit

PSYCH 145A: Monitoring the Crisis (PUBLPOL 141, SOC 141, SOC 241, URBANST 149)

A course devoted to understanding how people are faring as the country's health and economic crisis unfolds. The premise of the course is that, as important and valuable as surveys are, it's a capital mistake to presume that we know what needs to be asked and that fixed-response answers adequately convey the depth of what's happening. We introduce a new type of qualitative method that allows for discovery by capturing the voices of the people, learn what they're thinking and fearing, and understand the decisions they're making. Students are trained in immersive interviewing by completing actual interviews, coding and analyzing their field notes, and then writing reports describing what's happening across the country. These reports will be designed to find out who's hurting, why they're hurting, and how we can better respond to the crisis. Students interested should submit the following application: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfdOZsnpOCg4zTRbVny0ikxpZEd1AFEEJh3K9KjvINyfbW more »
A course devoted to understanding how people are faring as the country's health and economic crisis unfolds. The premise of the course is that, as important and valuable as surveys are, it's a capital mistake to presume that we know what needs to be asked and that fixed-response answers adequately convey the depth of what's happening. We introduce a new type of qualitative method that allows for discovery by capturing the voices of the people, learn what they're thinking and fearing, and understand the decisions they're making. Students are trained in immersive interviewing by completing actual interviews, coding and analyzing their field notes, and then writing reports describing what's happening across the country. These reports will be designed to find out who's hurting, why they're hurting, and how we can better respond to the crisis. Students interested should submit the following application: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfdOZsnpOCg4zTRbVny0ikxpZEd1AFEEJh3K9KjvINyfbWMGw/viewformnnThe course is open to students who have taken it in earlier quarters, with repeating students allowed to omit the training sessions and, in lieu of those sessions, complete additional field work and writing. Field work will include unique interviews with new participants each lab period, along with corresponding coding, analyses, and reports.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

PSYCH 146: Observation of Children

Learning about children through guided discussions and video analyses from Bing Nursery School. Together we will looking into children's interactions with the world around them within the contexts of their physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. We will also be examining their experiences in relation to research and theory. Note: Students will enroll in discussion sections through Canvas during the first week of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

PSYCH 147: Development in Early Childhood

For children playing is more than just fun; it is essential for children¿s growth and wellbeing. Play is so important to optimal child development that it has been recognized by the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights as a right of every child. This course explores this connection between different types of play and children¿s development in four arenas: social, emotional, cognitive, and physical. In order to promote optimal learning and growth in children, it is important to recognize that these cognitive, physical, social, and emotional systems are intertwined. In this course students will not only learn about play, but also examine their own play experiences and histories. Using readings, recordings of children at play, videos, presentations, and reflections we will delve into the experience of play for children and ourselves. The course is rooted in the play experiences and philosophy of Bing Nursery School, a laboratory school at Stanford. For over 50 years it has been engaging children in play-based learning experiences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3

PSYCH 147S: Introduction to the Psychology of Emotion

What are emotions? What purpose do they serve? How do we measure them? Can we control them? In this course, we will explore some of the most interesting questions in psychology: questions about emotion. Emotions shape our perceptions of the world, influence critical life decisions, and allow us to connect with others. This seminar will provide a selective review of the scientific study of emotion in Affective Science. The first unit of the course will focus on the theoretical foundations, the basic science of emotion, and methods for measuring emotions. In the second unit of the course, we will discuss topics at the intersection of motivation and emotion, such as decision-making and self-control. In the third unit, we will delve into the social function of emotions. In the fourth unit of the course, we will study the ways people succeed and fail at controlling their emotions. In the fifth unit, we will discuss a variety of additional topics such as how emotions change across the lifesp more »
What are emotions? What purpose do they serve? How do we measure them? Can we control them? In this course, we will explore some of the most interesting questions in psychology: questions about emotion. Emotions shape our perceptions of the world, influence critical life decisions, and allow us to connect with others. This seminar will provide a selective review of the scientific study of emotion in Affective Science. The first unit of the course will focus on the theoretical foundations, the basic science of emotion, and methods for measuring emotions. In the second unit of the course, we will discuss topics at the intersection of motivation and emotion, such as decision-making and self-control. In the third unit, we will delve into the social function of emotions. In the fourth unit of the course, we will study the ways people succeed and fail at controlling their emotions. In the fifth unit, we will discuss a variety of additional topics such as how emotions change across the lifespan, how emotions can be harnessed to engineer behavior change, as well as emotions and artificial intelligence. My goal is that you will leave this course with a scientifically-informed understanding of your own and others' emotions as well as strategies for how to effectively use and manage your feelings in daily life.
Last offered: Summer 2019

PSYCH 148S: The Psychology of Bias: Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination (CSRE 148P)

From Black Lives Matter to mansplaining, issues of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination grab our attention and draw our concern. This course brings together research from social, cognitive, affective, developmental, cultural, and neural perspectives to examine the processes that reflect and perpetuate group biases. Along with these various research perspectives, we will consider perspectives of both privileged and disadvantaged group members. Where do stereotypes come from? Why is race so hard to talk about? Can we be biased without knowing it? How can we reduce prejudice and conflict? We will address these and other questions through lectures, class discussion, and group presentations.
Last offered: Summer 2018
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