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1 - 10 of 34 results for: ILAC ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (COMPLIT 111Q, DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 122A: Radical Poetry: The Avant-garde in Latin America and Spain

The first few decades of the 20th century ushered in a dynamic literary and aesthetic renewal in Spain and Latin America. Young poets sought a radical change in response to a rapidly changing world, one marked by the horrors of World War I and the rise of a new technological urban society. This course will focus on the poetry and attendant manifestos of movements such as Creacionismo, Ultraismo, Estridentismo, Surrealismo and other -ismos. How did the European avant-garde (e.g. Futurism, Dada, and Surrealism) inform such aesthetic turns? In what ways did poetry assimilate modern visual culture while questioning established poetics? Authors may include Aleixandre, Borges, Cansino-Assens, G. Diego, G. de Torre, Huidobro, Larrea, Lorca, Maples Arce, Neruda, Tablada, and Vallejo. Taught in Spanish. Prior completion of SpanLang 102 is highly recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 123A: Resisting Coloniality: Then and Now (COMPLIT 123A)

What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class more »
What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class, gender, ethnicity, and race, and whose effects are still impactful for many groups of people nowadays. Authors may include Isabel Guevara, Catalina de Erauso, el Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana, Simón Bolívar, Flora Tristán, Silvina Ocampo, Jorge Luis Borges, and Gabriel García Márquez. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5

ILAC 124: Coming of Age in Latin America

What can a novel tell us about coming of age? How does a novel shape a character when they do not conform to social norms? This course interrogates how the coming of age novel the Bildungsroman may combine, successfully or not, a narrative of national social progress and of personal growth. We will compare and contrast short selections from 19th, 20th and 21st centuries novels, while analyzing two masterpieces in depth. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 127: After Dictatorship: Facts, Fiction, and Justice in Latin America

In the wake of dictatorships across twentieth-century Latin America, writers and artists (as well as laws and truth commissions) have confronted past human rights violations. Today, authors across disciplines and genres continue to grapple with past atrocities. In this course, as we examine the stories we tell about the past, we will focus on concepts such as memory, truth, and justice. What kind of truth can fiction uncover? Whose stories are either remembered or excluded? How do different types of narratives confront issues of human rights and justice? And what can these narratives teach us about issues we continue to face today? Course will be taught in Spanish with the option to write in English (majors should write in Spanish). Readings will be in Spanish (and in Portuguese with translation) and will include fictional and "true crime" narratives as well as legal/historical texts and manifestos. Authors may include Alia Trabucco Zerán, Gonzálo Eltesch, Selva Almada, Mariana Enríquez, Neusa Maria Pereira, and Julián Fuks.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Ward, C. (PI)

ILAC 128: Spanish Literature and Language through Comics (CHILATST 128)

The course, an exploration of the graphic narrative medium in Spanish, is open to intermediate and advanced Spanish speakers. We'll analyze vignettes, sections, or chapters from both auteur and pop-culture series. These may include: Mortadelo y Filemón and Arrugas (Spain), Mafalda and El eternauta (Argentina), Ídolo and Condorito (Chile), Los once and Caminos condenados (Colombia), Vampiros en La Habana (Cuba), Virus tropical (Ecuador/ Colombia), Vivos se los llevaron (Mexico), as well as Spy vs. Spy and My Favorite Thing is Monsters (ChicanX/LatinX). Secondary sources include McCloud and Dorfman and Mattelart. The through line will be representations and instantiations of power struggles in this deceivingly naive form. Visual narratological aspects and the specificity of the medium will also be discussed at length. Language learners must enroll in the cognate course SPANLANG 128 "Concurrent Writing Support."
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 130: Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will cover the period from the loss of the Spanish empire, through the civil wars and dictatorships to the end of the Portuguese Estado Novo and the monarchic restoration in Spain. Particular attention will be given to the Peninsula's difficult negotiation of its cultural and national diversity, with an emphasis on current events. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study program in Spain. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ILAC 131: Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ILAC 136: Modern Iberian Literatures

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 139: Jaguars and Labyrinths: A Survey of South American Short Fiction (COMPLIT 139A)

10 South American short stories in 10 weeks. We will read tales of jaguars and octopuses, labyrinthic cities and eerie parks, magicians and mediums, time loops and spatial stretches. Each of the works will offer a unique insight into South American literature, history, and culture. We will focus on 20th and 21st century stories that deal with the future of techno-science, the interaction between Western and indigenous worldviews, the intersection of fiction and reality, the relation between the human and the non-human, and the ecological planetary crisis. Authors include Clarice Lispector, Roberto Bolaño, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, João Guimarães Rosa, Vilém Flusser, and Conceição Evaristo. Taught in English, no previous knowledge of Spanish and Portuguese required. Note: Students with a background in Portuguese and/or Spanish may use this course as a platform to enhance their linguistic proficiency and their close-reading skills in the target languages.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Barletta, V. (PI)
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