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431 - 440 of 471 results for: all courses

RELIGST 227: The Qur'an (RELIGST 327)

Early history, themes, structure, chronology, and premodern interpretation. Relative chronology of passages.
Last offered: Autumn 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 231: European Reformations (HISTORY 231G, HISTORY 331G, RELIGST 331)

Readings in and discussion of theological and social aspects of sixteenth century reformations: Luther, Radical Reform, Calvin, and Council of Trent, missionary expansion, religious conflict, creative and artistic expressions. Texts include primary sources and secondary scholarly essays and monographs.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

RELIGST 239: Luther and the Reform of Western Christianity (RELIGST 339)

Luther's theology, ethics, biblical interpretation, and social reforms and their significance for the remaking of Western Christianity. Readings include Luther's own writings and secondary sources about Luther and his world.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 245: Religion, Reason, and Romanticism

The late 18th-century European cultural shift from rationalist to romantic modes of thought and sensibility. Debates about religion as catalysts for the new Zeitgeist. Readings include: the Jewish metaphysician, Mendelssohn; the dramatist, Lessing; the philosopher of language and history, Herder; the critical idealist, Kant; and the transcendental idealist, Fichte.
Last offered: Autumn 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 246: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 256G, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

RELIGST 250: Classics of Indian Buddhism

Texts in English translation includING discourses (sutras), philosophical treatises, commentaries, didactic epistles, hymns, biographies, and narratives.
Last offered: Spring 2008 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 252: Hearts and Diamonds: The Lives of Buddhist Sacred Texts

An exploration of two key Mahayana Buddhist scriptures (the Heart & Diamond Sutras) and their histories, looking at what they say and how they have been used, from the first millennium to the present day.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 258: Readings in Japanese Buddhist Texts (RELIGST 358)

In this course, we will read premodern Japanese Buddhist texts. Prerequisite: Chinese and/or Japanese.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

RELIGST 261A: Belief (in a post-Christian Age)

The post-Chritain (or post-modern) age has given rise to new forms of faith, ranging from secular humanism and cultural atheism to rediscovery of the transcendent in the cosmos and quantum mechanics. However, unlike the era of "Christendom," belief is no longer necessarily hinged to faith. This course explores the origins of this phenomenon in Thomas Aquinas, and then newer philosophical approaches to understanding belief, ranging from Charles Taylor and Talal Asad and their theories of the secular, to Catherine Bell and the role of practice in believing. Finally, we turn to the work of three contemporary theorists of religious belief: Gianni Vattimo, Jean-Luc Marion, and Richard Kearney, who endeavor to cast believing outside established theological categories, yet still speak of "god."
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 271A: Dante's Spiritual Vision

Poetry, ethics, and theology in Dante's Divine Comedy. Supplementary readings from classical authors such as St. Thomas Aquinas, and from modern writers, such as Jorge Borges. Fulfills capstone seminar requirement for the Philosophy and Literature tracks. Students may take 271A without taking 271B. Consent of the instructor required.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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