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DANCE 108: Hip Hop Choreography: Hip Hop Meets Broadway

What happens when Hip Hop meets "Fosse", "Aida", "Dream Girls" and "In the Heights"?nThe most amazing collaboration of Hip Hop styles adapted to some of the most memorable Broadway Productions.nThis class will explore the realm between Hip Hop Dance and the Broadway Stage. Infusing Acting thru dance movement and exploring the Art of Lip Sync thru Hip Hop Dance styles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable 9 times (up to 9 units total)
Instructors: Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 109: Choreography: Strategies to Building Movement, Dance, and Time Based Art

A class for students interested in contemporary methods of devising movement for performance. At the forefront of current dance culture hybridity has become the new normal, with movement blended from everyday actions, classical forms, hip-hop, and beyond. The body as a vehicle for expression is an ever expanding landscape and the class will focus on the plethora of ways movement can be derived including; the many ways improvisation can engender movement, how systemic approaches to performance can enhance a creators understanding of the body in space, the ways chaos and ugliness can redefine our notions of beauty, and how environment, sound, music, and context can inform our physical sensibilities. The class is open to all students from any movement background or those new to dance with a curiosity about how the body can be a vibrant and multifaceted artistic tool. For more information please contact choreographer and lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 118: Developing Creativity In Dance

This introductory course explores the creative process in dance. There are many effective ways to approach creative expression, and this course will utilize multiple approaches, both in series and in parallel. Parallel processing and multitasking will become the dominant mode as rational, intuitive and physical skills merge. Processes will include changing perception, design by analogy, quick adaptation to changing situations, musicality, overcoming creative blocks, and stress reduction to relax into a more creative state of mind. This will be an online course; students must have this time slot available for Zoom participatory sessions. Class sessions will alternate between theory and practice, with student choreographies submitted and discussed online. Previous dance experience will not be required to take this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 123: Choreography: Hot Mess & Deliberate Failure as Practice

A dance class in how we become the worst dancer possible. The foundation of this class has many parts. One is that, in almost every respect the way we gain insight into anything is to understand more clearly its polarity. As a class we purposely explore chaos, failure, and "bad" dancing, with the hope that then we will have a greater chance to understand and refine our personal notions around beauty. The class also acknowledges that creativity is at times born from the loss of control. Instead of looking at this idea obliquely, Hot Mess looks at this directly by having dancers confront a number of movement and vocal prompts that are literally impossible to execute in any good way. This class embraces and celebrates destabilization, with all the exuberance, fear, and learning that can happen when we accept and practice being lost.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 140: Contemporary Modern II

This intermediate studio dance practice class is primarily grounded in training practices of Merce Cunningham, with additional technical work drawn from other major modern dance training techniques. Participation in this class will increase strength, speed, line, amplitude and rhythmic acuity/musicality. Dance technique will be supplemented by other studio experiences that will increase awareness of dance as an art form. Studio work will be supplemented by readings, video viewings, concert attendance, and lively participation in classes with guest artists. Students must be ready to work at an intermediate level.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Faulkner, K. (PI)

DANCE 141: Contemporary Modern III

This advanced level technique course will cover the fundamental principles underlying modern/contemporary dance both technical and artistic in nature. Students will perform technical exercises that develop functional efficiency, strength, flexibility, musicality, range of motion and performance quality as a means towards honing their own artistic expression and physicality. More advanced concepts such as qualitative versatility, phrasing awareness, innovative physical decision-making, and attention to performance will be explored in greater depth. The contemporary technique taught in this class prepares the student to perform with clarity and artistry, and with deeper anatomical knowledge and connectivity. Short written reflections and concert attendance will supplement studio work. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Faulkner, K. (PI)

DANCE 148: Ballet II

Intermediate Ballet at Stanford is designed for students who have done ballet in their past, but maybe have stepped away from the form for awhile. The class focuses on technique, musicality, vocabulary, coordination and artistic choice. The class looks at ballet as an enduring and vibrant movement system that can be used for classical purposes or as a way to strengthen and diversify the movement vocabulary inherent in other dance forms like modern, hip-hop, or social dancing.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

DANCE 149: Ballet III

Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 166: History of Social Dance in Western Culture

A survey of movement and historical dance from the past five centuries to today, with the technique and general deportment that is distinctive to each era. Historic dances will include the Galliard, Pavan, Minuet, Waltz, Polonaise, Tango, Jazz Age and Swing Era dances, through today's social dance forms. The course will include techniques for historical dance reconstruction, with students creating their own dance reconstructions. This course will culminate by utilizing the understanding of five centuries of dance evolution to envision a better, more evolved, future of social dance forms, integrating gender issues and ideal human interactions. This will be an online course; students must have this time slot available for Zoom participatory sessions. Prerequisite: Dance 46.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce
Instructors: Powers, R. (PI)

DLCL 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (ILAC 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)
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