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61 - 70 of 339 results for: CSI::certificate

CHPR 166: Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context (HUMBIO 166)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 166. Med/Graduate students must enroll in CHRP 166.) The material in this course is an introduction to the field and the target audience is undergraduates. It may be of interest to graduate students unfamiliar with the field. The class examines the array of forces that affect the foods human beings eat, and when, where, and how we eat them, including human labor, agriculture, environmental sustainability, politics, animal rights/welfare, ethics, policy, culture, economics, business, law, trade, and ideology, and psychology. The class addresses the impact of current policies and actions that might be taken to improve human nutrition and health; macro-scale influences on food, nutrition, and eating behavior. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Undergraduate Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)

CHPR 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (HRP 218, MED 212)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students.Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

COMM 162: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 262, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

COMM 262: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 162, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

COMM 308: Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology (POLISCI 321, PSYCH 284)

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

CS 377E: Designing Solutions to Global Grand Challenges

In this course we creatively apply information technologies to collectively attack Global Grand Challenges (e.g., global warming, rising healthcare costs and declining access, and ensuring quality education for all). Interdisciplinary student teams will carry out need-finding within a target domain, followed by brainstorming to propose a quarter long project. Teams will spend the rest of the quarter applying user-centered design methods to rapidly iterate through design, prototyping, and testing of their solutions. This course will interweave a weekly lecture with a weekly studio session where students apply the techniques hands-on in a small-scale, supportive environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CS 421: Designing AI to Cultivate Human Well-Being

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the potential to drive us towards a better future for all of humanity, but it also comes with significant risks and challenges. At its best, AI can help humans mitigate climate change, diagnose and treat diseases more effectively, enhance learning, and improve access to capital throughout the world. But it also has the potential to exacerbate human biases, destroy trust in information flow, displace entire industries, and amplify inequality throughout the world. We have arrived at a pivotal moment in the development of the technology in which we must establish a foundation for how we will design AI to capture the positive potential and mitigate the negative risks. To do this, building AI must be an inclusive, interactive, and introspective process guided by an affirmative vision of a beneficial AI-future. The goal of this interdisciplinary class is to bridge the gap between technological and societal objectives: How do we design AI to promote human well more »
Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the potential to drive us towards a better future for all of humanity, but it also comes with significant risks and challenges. At its best, AI can help humans mitigate climate change, diagnose and treat diseases more effectively, enhance learning, and improve access to capital throughout the world. But it also has the potential to exacerbate human biases, destroy trust in information flow, displace entire industries, and amplify inequality throughout the world. We have arrived at a pivotal moment in the development of the technology in which we must establish a foundation for how we will design AI to capture the positive potential and mitigate the negative risks. To do this, building AI must be an inclusive, interactive, and introspective process guided by an affirmative vision of a beneficial AI-future. The goal of this interdisciplinary class is to bridge the gap between technological and societal objectives: How do we design AI to promote human well-being? The ultimate aim is to provide tools and frameworks to build a more harmonious human society based on cooperation toward a shared vision. Thus, students are trained in basic science to understand what brings about the conditions for human flourishing and will create meaningful AI technologies that aligns with the PACE framework: 1) has a clear and meaningful purpose, 2) augments human dignity and autonomy, 3) creates a feeling of inclusivity and collaboration, 4) creates shared prosperity and a sense of forward movement (excellence). Toward this end, students work in interdisciplinary teams on a final project and propose a solution that tackles a significant societal challenge by leveraging technology and frameworks on human thriving.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

CSB 240B: A Practical Approach to Drug Discover and Development

(Continuation of 240A) Advancing a drug from discovery of a therapeutic target to human trials and commercialization. Topics include: high throughput assay development, compound screening, lead optimization, protecting intellectual property, toxicology testing, regulatory issues, assessment of clinical need, defining the market, conducting clinical trials, project management, and commercialization issues, including approach to licensing and raising capital. Maximum units are available by taking an additional contact hour. Prerequisite: 240A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CSB 242: Drug Discovery and Development Seminar Series

The scientific principles and technologies involved in making the transition from a basic biological observation to the creation of a new drug emphasizing molecular and genetic issues. Prerequisite: biochemistry, chemistry, or bioengineering.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

CSB 245: Economics of Biotechnology

Focuses on translation of promising research discovery into marketed drugs and the integration of scientific method, clinical needs assessment, clinical and regulatory strategy, market analysis, economic considerations, and the influence of the healthcare economic ecosystem necessary for successful translation. Explores the economic perspectives of various stakeholders--patients, providers, payers, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, FDA, and financial markets--and how they influence drug development.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Grimes, K. (PI)
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