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PWR 91KSA: Intermediate Writing: Storytelling and Science

What is story? What is storytelling? And why would storytelling be crucial for science communication? In this class we will develop your Story IQ: we will learn how humans evolved to be the storytelling animal, how stories shape our lives, and why and how science communication needs storytelling in order to be relevant to public audiences. We'll move from looking at story architecture, to critiquing story structures (and stories) in science communications, and then to creating compelling stories of our own that communicate and/or correct science research or discovery. For course video and full description, visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/science-and-storytelling.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91OID: Creating Your Digital Presence: The What, How, and Why of Building an Online Presence

Have you ever Googled yourself? If so, what information about you rises to the top? A picture of you in your band uniform from your high school? A poem you wrote and published on your Tumblr? Maybe your scores from a 5K you ran last year? nnIt might seem like you do not have much control over what you see about yourself in a Google search, but the fact is, you do. The more of your own content you create, the more that your self-created information will rise to the top. In this class, you will select content most significant to you, which could include research posters, photo essays, short stories, interviews, prototypes, and beyond. To curate and polish these pieces, we will ask ¿how can you craft an online identity that shares not only your accomplishments, but also your motivations?¿, ¿what makes your best work meaningful?¿, and ¿what platform will best allow you to showcase your identity?¿ Through learning the theories, tools, and techniques behind digital content management, this c more »
Have you ever Googled yourself? If so, what information about you rises to the top? A picture of you in your band uniform from your high school? A poem you wrote and published on your Tumblr? Maybe your scores from a 5K you ran last year? nnIt might seem like you do not have much control over what you see about yourself in a Google search, but the fact is, you do. The more of your own content you create, the more that your self-created information will rise to the top. In this class, you will select content most significant to you, which could include research posters, photo essays, short stories, interviews, prototypes, and beyond. To curate and polish these pieces, we will ask ¿how can you craft an online identity that shares not only your accomplishments, but also your motivations?¿, ¿what makes your best work meaningful?¿, and ¿what platform will best allow you to showcase your identity?¿ Through learning the theories, tools, and techniques behind digital content management, this class will help you get better connected with the individuals and/or organizations that interest you. nnWe will practice several pragmatic techniques for building our own personal ePortfolio (i.e. a website). Through participating in hands-on activities, storytelling exercises, and in-class discussions, you will have the opportunity to enact what we¿re learning and to experiment with different forms of expressing yourself online.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91SP: Intermediate Writing: Doctors' Stories: The Rhetoric of Illness and Healing

While medicine is a science that relies on meticulous research and professional protocols, it is also full of characters, conflicts, scenes, dialogues, and resolutions; in other words, stories. This course explores why we must value communication in medicine and how narratives mediate that communication. During the quarter, you will pursue independent research on a topic of your choice in the health sciences and practice interviewing experts as well as writing accurate and engaging science journalism in a number of genres: the story pitch, the news story, and the profile. Your final project will be a research-based digital magazine story coached by the Stanford Storytelling Project.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 194AV: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Drawn from Life: The Power of True Stories in Autobio Comics

The most impactful, fantastical stories often come not from fiction but from our own richly diverse lives. In this course you will explore autobiographical comics as a form of personal narrative ideally suited for communicating purposeful messages about culture, identity, and experience. We will embark on an immersive journey through comics in which authors tell their own true stories with rhetorical purpose, such as revealing the nuances of cultural identity, illuminating the experiences of marginalized communities or perspectives, and/or promoting advocacy or change. You will engage in deep analysis of how these comics reveal and help create the rhetorical practices of particular cultural communities. No drawing experience or expertise is required. For more information see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses-writing-and-rhetoric
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

SINY 114: Writing in the City

The craft of fiction writing and introduction to the literary culture of New York. Writing exercises will tune students¿ senses to the rhythms of New York. Students produce their own short stories, which will be examined in workshop discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

SINY 116: Off the iPhone and Into the City: Creating a Photography Project

Learn components of photography projects and image making including content selection, intention, context, and audience. Talks by professional photographers; field trips to in the city. Two response papers about an exhibition, publication, or long-form web project during their time in New York.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

SINY 121: On Stage and Backstage: Navigating the Landscape of Professional Theater in New York -- Real Artists

In this immersive intensive, students will learn the basics from professionals in the fields of Acting, Directing, Theatrical Management, Union Representation and Stage Management. Lectures and interactive workshops moderated and run by Kay Kostopoulos will feature her former Stanford students and professional colleagues who have achieved significant success in the New York arts scene.
| UG Reqs: WAY-CE

SINY 140: Mapping, time, space, and culture

New York, the financial and cultural capitol of the nation, provides an extraordinary laboratory for exploring the art and science of information representation. The proposed course aims to engage students in a broad swath of art and culture, contextualized by studying the sociopolitical urban landscape.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

SINY 142: Documenting New York

Documenting New York is a film studies course (with a small video production component) exploring the rich history and many cultures of New York through the classic documentary films that have been produced throughout the city¿s past hundred years.Through the lens of documentary films that feature New York City as a landscape and central subject, students will gain a greater understanding of the documentary film form itself, considering aesthetic and formal issues, as well as ethical issues related to the politics of representation.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

SINY 152: Film: The City as Muse

Has a film ever challenged your beliefs, transformed your understanding of an issue, left an emotional aftershock, or motivated you to act? Was that the intention of the filmmaker or an unanticipated consequence? Since the inception of the motion picture, the urban landscape and its inhabitants have served as a rich and diverse palette for filmmakers. This course will provide an overview of documentary, experimental, and hybrid films that proffer an unexpected and sometimes disturbing perspective on cities, both here and abroad. We will examine films that privilege artistic expression and expand the conventions of the film form, analyzing how filmmakers distill an issue, situation, or environment through a particular formal style and point-of-view.nnThrough a consideration of iconic historic films, the student will gain a rich understanding of how cities have inspired filmmakers who work outside the traditional fiction genre. In addition to written assignments, students will distill th more »
Has a film ever challenged your beliefs, transformed your understanding of an issue, left an emotional aftershock, or motivated you to act? Was that the intention of the filmmaker or an unanticipated consequence? Since the inception of the motion picture, the urban landscape and its inhabitants have served as a rich and diverse palette for filmmakers. This course will provide an overview of documentary, experimental, and hybrid films that proffer an unexpected and sometimes disturbing perspective on cities, both here and abroad. We will examine films that privilege artistic expression and expand the conventions of the film form, analyzing how filmmakers distill an issue, situation, or environment through a particular formal style and point-of-view.nnThrough a consideration of iconic historic films, the student will gain a rich understanding of how cities have inspired filmmakers who work outside the traditional fiction genre. In addition to written assignments, students will distill their own experience of the city through photo essays that explore the eclectic geographic, social, and cultural life of New York. Local ¿field trips¿ will include attendance at the annual Margaret Mead Film Festival in October and DocNYC in November. Course readings and discussion will provide an incisive inquiry into the artistic ¿voice¿ of the filmmaker in an analysis of both form and content.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
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