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121 - 130 of 204 results for: SOC

SOC 258C: Using Data to Describe the World: Descriptive Social Science Research Techniques (EDUC 430C)

Course provides hands-on practice in analysis of data from experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, including a) instrumental variables estimators; b) regression discontinuity estimators; c) difference-in-difference estimators; d) matching estimators; e) fixed effects estimators; and f) panel data methods (including individual fixed effects models, lagged covariate adjustment models, growth models, etc.). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of EDUC 255B, EDUC 257C, or SOC 257. May be repeat for credit
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

SOC 260: Formal Organizations (SOC 160)

(Graduate students register for 260.) The roles of formal organizations in production processes, market transactions, and social movements; and as sources of income and ladders of mobility. Relationships of modern organizations to environments and internal structures and processes. Concepts, models, and tools for analyzing organizational phenomena in contemporary societies. Sources include the literature and case studies.
Last offered: Winter 2018

SOC 262: The Social Regulation of Markets (SOC 162)

Social and political forces that shape market outcomes. The emergence and creation of markets, how markets go wrong, and the roles of government and society in structuring market exchange. Applied topics include development, inequality, globalization, and economic meltdown. Preference to Sociology majors and Sociology coterm students.
Last offered: Spring 2018

SOC 267A: Asia-Pacific Transformation (SOC 167A)

Post-WW II transformation in the Asia-Pacific region, with focus on the ascent of Japan, the development of newly industrialized capitalist countries (S. Korea and Taiwan), the emergence of socialist states (China and N. Korea), and the changing relationship between the U.S. and these countries.
Last offered: Spring 2018

SOC 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168)

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. This class is associated with a study on guide Michelin starred restaurants' changes of strategies and how these impact the organization of the kitchen. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

SOC 270: Classics of Modern Social Theory (SOC 170)

(Graduate students register for 270). We usually take it for granted that people around us follow social rules, norms, and conventions. But how are social order and stable social existence possible? And under what conditions does social change become possible? When we follow the rules or mobilize for new ones, do we act as free-willing individuals or do we merely respond to social structures that we have no control over? This class will discuss the insights from classical sociologists (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Simmel) on these and other fundamental social questions. We will discuss other macro-level issues like the emergence of capitalism, the relationship between social structure and politics, and the social sources of religion and political ideology. In doing so, we will analyze how these thinkers are still relevant to understanding contemporary social transformations as well as how the world has changed since these thinkers wrote.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Furuta, J. (PI)

SOC 271: Organizational Analysis (EDUC 288)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 273: Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives (EDUC 173, EDUC 273, FEMGEN 173, SOC 173)

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies interact with gender, gender identity, and other characteristics in the United States, around the world, and over time. Attention is paid to how changes in those structures and policies relate to access to, experiences in, and outcomes of higher education by gender. Students can expect to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and feminist scholarship and pedagogy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

SOC 276: The Social Life of Neighborhoods (AFRICAAM 76B, CSRE 176B, SOC 176, URBANST 179)

How do neighborhoods come to be? How and why do they change? What is the role of power, money, race, immigration, segregation, culture, government, and other forces? In this course, students will interrogate these questions using literatures from sociology, geography, and political science, along with archival, observational, interview, and cartographic (GIS) methods. Students will work in small groups to create content (e.g., images, audio, and video) for a self-guided ¿neighborhood tour,¿ which will be added to a mobile app and/or website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Stuart, F. (PI)

SOC 278: Introduction to Computational Social Science (MS&E 231)

With a vast amount of data now collected on our online and offline actions -- from what we buy, to where we travel, to who we interact with -- we have an unprecedented opportunity to study complex social systems. This opportunity, however, comes with scientific, engineering, and ethical challenges. In this hands-on course, we develop ideas from computer science and statistics to address problems in sociology, economics, political science, and beyond. We cover techniques for collecting and parsing data, methods for large-scale machine learning, and principles for effectively communicating results. To see how these techniques are applied in practice, we discuss recent research findings in a variety of areas. Prerequisites: introductory course in applied statistics, and experience coding in R, Python, or another high-level language.
Last offered: Autumn 2017
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