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1 - 10 of 11 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 30SC: SoCo Humanities Research Intensive

Join two Stanford professors for a week of immersive, expert introduction to humanities research. This intensive, one-week course introduces rising sophomores to the excitement and wonder of humanities research, along the way preparing you for independent research projects, for working as a research assistant for a Stanford professor, or just for the next step in your Stanford career. No humanities background is necessary. Think of this class as humanities research in a nutshell: over 5 days, we'll take a deep dive into some of the most important methods and questions driving scholarly research in the humanities. Our laboratory will be the Special Collections Library at Stanford, where we'll conduct hands-on research in ancient and modern books, maps, objects, and manuscripts, from ancient Mesopotamian clay tablets to materials from San Francisco's Chinatown. We're also planning a field trip to the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. Over the week, we'll teach you how to formulate a soli more »
Join two Stanford professors for a week of immersive, expert introduction to humanities research. This intensive, one-week course introduces rising sophomores to the excitement and wonder of humanities research, along the way preparing you for independent research projects, for working as a research assistant for a Stanford professor, or just for the next step in your Stanford career. No humanities background is necessary. Think of this class as humanities research in a nutshell: over 5 days, we'll take a deep dive into some of the most important methods and questions driving scholarly research in the humanities. Our laboratory will be the Special Collections Library at Stanford, where we'll conduct hands-on research in ancient and modern books, maps, objects, and manuscripts, from ancient Mesopotamian clay tablets to materials from San Francisco's Chinatown. We're also planning a field trip to the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. Over the week, we'll teach you how to formulate a solid research question; how to gather the evidence that will help you to answer that question; how to write up research results; how to critique the research of your fellow students; how to deliver your results in a public setting; and how to write a really great grant proposal. Students who complete this course become eligible for follow-up student research grants during their next year. So if you have a larger project in mind - a capstone project, or even a senior thesis idea - this course can help set the stage for that next step. Learning Goals: Introduction to humanities research methods; Conceptualization of a major humanities research project; Skills and familiarity with working with archival materials; Oral presentation skills.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1

HISTORY 102: History of the International System since 1914 (INTNLREL 102)

The course seeks to explain the history of international relations in the tumultuous century since 1914. It aims at a three-dimensional understanding, relating social and political structures of countries and regions to the primary shifts in the character of the competition between states, in the composition of the system, and in international institutions and norms. Great power interactions constitute the most visible element within the course: through the two world wars, into the Cold War, and beyond. Concurrently, we look within the empires and blocs of the Twentieth Century world, to consider the changing relationships between imperial centers and subject peoples. Lastly, we consider spirited if sporadic international efforts to pursue order, justice, and progress. This last pursuit also requires study of the proliferation of transnational non-governmental organizations (NGOs).
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 257D: War, Revolution, and Modern American Society

War has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. Whatever the extent of American participation, war has transformed how Americans think about other nations, the environment, technology, and the meaning of death and dying. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. Wars and revolutions abroad have likewise played a part in molding American identity. This course examines how Americans have observed, experienced, and thought about modern war and revolution in history, literature, and popular culture. Course themes will include mobilization, protest and dissent, building empire, gender and masculinity, race and xenophobia, the economics of war, coercion and propaganda, war and the environment, and the changing meanings of death and sacrifice. The course begins with the American Civil War, and takes students through the rise of American more »
War has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. Whatever the extent of American participation, war has transformed how Americans think about other nations, the environment, technology, and the meaning of death and dying. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. Wars and revolutions abroad have likewise played a part in molding American identity. This course examines how Americans have observed, experienced, and thought about modern war and revolution in history, literature, and popular culture. Course themes will include mobilization, protest and dissent, building empire, gender and masculinity, race and xenophobia, the economics of war, coercion and propaganda, war and the environment, and the changing meanings of death and sacrifice. The course begins with the American Civil War, and takes students through the rise of American empire, the world wars, the Bolshevik Revolution, the Cold War, Vietnam, and closes with the War on Terror. Students will be introduced to a variety of primary and secondary sources and historical methods directed at probing the paradox of how conflict creates social cohesion, and will be guided by a basic ethical question: how do we live together?
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Clements, A. (PI)

HISTORY 297C: Pre-modern Chinese Foreign Relations and Diplomacy

As the PRC's economic and political clout has grown, Chinese diplomacy and foreign relations have drawn far more attention. Especially following the start of Xi Jinping's Belt and Road initiative, both popular and academic commentators have often referred to the supposedly ancient precedents of the modern PRC's approach to foreign policy. PRC leaders have themselves invoked the Chinese tradition of foreign relations as one that enabled largely peaceful coexistence between China and its neighbors, unlike Western alternatives. This course will take a long-duree approach to understanding the conceptual frameworks, interactions, and historical events that shaped Chinese diplomacy and foreign relations from the time of the Mongol invasions up to the early twentieth century. The questions we will consider include: What basic geographic, environmental, and economic factors influenced Chinese foreign relations? Did frequently invoked concepts like "the tributary system" or "Silk Road" actually more »
As the PRC's economic and political clout has grown, Chinese diplomacy and foreign relations have drawn far more attention. Especially following the start of Xi Jinping's Belt and Road initiative, both popular and academic commentators have often referred to the supposedly ancient precedents of the modern PRC's approach to foreign policy. PRC leaders have themselves invoked the Chinese tradition of foreign relations as one that enabled largely peaceful coexistence between China and its neighbors, unlike Western alternatives. This course will take a long-duree approach to understanding the conceptual frameworks, interactions, and historical events that shaped Chinese diplomacy and foreign relations from the time of the Mongol invasions up to the early twentieth century. The questions we will consider include: What basic geographic, environmental, and economic factors influenced Chinese foreign relations? Did frequently invoked concepts like "the tributary system" or "Silk Road" actually exist in Chinese thought, and if so, how did they affect the pragmatic practice of diplomacy? What was the role of ritual, poetry, and other forms of praxis in the sphere of foreign relations? How did the way that Chinese thought about the outside world and foreigners thought about China shift over time, especially in the 19th century with the advent of the much more pressing threat of European powers and Japan? The course will conclude by more directly examining the legacy of imperial Chinese foreign relations for China and the world in the 20th and 21st century.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Prakash, P. (PI)

HISTORY 299F: Curricular Practical Training

Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results and follow-up projects. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship and faculty sponsorship.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

HISTORY 299S: Undergraduate Directed Research and Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 399W: Graduate Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 481: Graduate Research Seminar in Ottoman and Middle East History (JEWISHST 287S, JEWISHST 481)

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

HISTORY 486B: Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History (JEWISHST 486B)

Prerequisite: HISTORY 486A.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

HISTORY 499X: Graduate Research

Units by arrangement. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
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