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41 - 50 of 207 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 168A: A.I.-Activism-Art (CSRE 106A, ENGLISH 106A, SYMSYS 168A)

Lecture/studio course exploring arts and humanities scholarship and practice engaging with, and generated by, emerging emerging and exponential technologies. Our course will explore intersections of art and artificial intelligence with an emphasis on social impact and racial justice. Open to all undergraduates.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 173N: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art

From Pop to postmodernism, contemporary art in the United States has often taken up issues of race, gender, and sexuality. In this seminar, we will study how artists from the 1960s to the present have drawn upon a wide range of media (including painting, photography, sculpture, performance, video, and the internet) to address racial injustice, gender inequity, and the surveillance of sexuality. Guest speakers will include contemporary artists confronting these issues in our current, highly charged moment.
Last offered: Autumn 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP

ARTHIST 180: Art, Meditation, and Creation (ARTSINST 280, LIFE 180)

Art and meditation invite us to be fully present in our minds and bodies. This class will give you tools to integrate mind and body as you explore artworks on display at the university's museums and throughout campus. In your engagement with activity-based learning at these venues, you will attend to perception and embodiment in the process of writing and making creative work about art. You will also learn meditation techniques and be exposed to authors who foreground the importance of the body in both writing and making art. For your meditation-centered and research-based final creative project, you will have the option of writing an experimental visual analysis or devising a performance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ARTHIST 181: Pacific Dreams: Art in California

This lecture course will explore the rich and diverse history of art made in California, with special focus on the interchanges between the fine arts and subcultural expression. From the Carleton Watkins' exquisite mammoth plate photographs of Yosemite to the cool sci-fi experiments of Light and Space artists such as James Turrell; from the feminist experiments of Judy Chicago to the black magic of Betye Saar's ritualistic objects, artists have explored California's landscape, history, and diverse population in myriad ways. Topics of study will include art in San Francisco Chinatown; Hollywood and contemporary performance; psychedelia and the counterculture; Afrofuturism; and glam, punk rock, and hardcore in Los Angeles. Special attention will be paid to issues of immigration, race, and ethnicity in California.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 182B: Cultures in Competition: Arts of Song-Era China (ARTHIST 382B)

The Song dynasty (mid-10th to late 13th c.) was a period of extraordinary diversity and technical accomplishment in Chinese painting, ceramics, calligraphy, architecture and sculpture. Artistic developments emerged within a context of economic dynamism, urban growth, and competition in dynastic, political, cultural and social arenas ¿ as between Chinese and formerly nomadic neighboring regimes, or between reformers and conservatives. This course will consider major themes and topics in Song art history, including innovations in architectural and ceramic technologies; developments in landscape painting and theory; the rise of educated artists; official arts and ideologies of Song, Liao and Jin court regimes; new roles for women as patrons and cultural participants; and Chan and popular Buddhist imagery.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 185: Arts of China in the Early Modern World, 1550-1800 (ARTHIST 385)

The dynamic period of late Ming and early Qing dynasty China, roughly 1500-1800 CE, was marked by political crisis and conquest, but also by China's participation in global systems of trade and knowledge exchanges involving porcelain, illustrated books, garden designs and systems of perspectival representation. Topics will include Innovations in urban centers of painting and print culture, politically inflected painting, and cultural syncretism in court painting and garden design.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 186B: Asian American Art (AMSTUD 186D, ASNAMST 186B)

This lecture course explores the work of artists, craftspeople, and laborers of Asian descent from 1850-present. Rather than a discrete identity category, we approach ¿Asian American¿ as an expansive, relational term that encompasses heterogenous experiences of racialization and migration. Key themes include the history of immigration and displacement; diasporic geographies; art, activism, and community; feminist/queer perspectives; and interethnic conflict and solidarity. The course coincides with the public launch exhibitions of the Asian American Art Initiative (AAAI) at the Cantor Arts Center and includes regular visits to the museum and Stanford Special Collections.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP

ARTHIST 188: Imperial Collecting, Patronage, and Taste in China and Japan (ARTHIST 388)

Explores how the imperial courts collected and censored art in China and Japan ca. 1000-1800. The imperial control over art collecting activities shaped the way in which court painters represented the world. The imperial court dictated art creations and occasionally threatened the lives of art collectors through violent art confiscations. Students learn how institutional mechanisms form the underlying force behind art creation and circulation in imperial China and Japan. Students also discover the confluence of art, politics, and cultural transmission as imperial patronage shaped transnational networks.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Pang, H. (PI)

ARTHIST 188B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art (ARTHIST 388B)

Chinese artistic developments in an era of revolution and modernization, from Shanghai Modern and New National Painting though the politicized art of the Cultural Revolution and post-Mao era re-entry into international arenas.
Last offered: Spring 2022 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP

ARTHIST 191: African American Art (AFRICAAM 191B, CSRE 191)

This course explores major art and political movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and #BlackLivesMatter, that have informed and were inspired by African American artists. Students will read pivotal texts written by Black artists, historians, philosophers and activists; consider how artists have contended with issues of identity, race, gender, and sexuality; and learn about galleries, collections, and organizations founded to support the field. Attendance on the first day of class is a requirement for enrollment.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP
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