2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023 2023-2024
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 15 results for: OCEANS

OCEANS 3: Frontiers in Ocean Science (BIO 3)

An introduction to contemporary research in ocean sciences, including oceanography, ecology, evolution, developmental biology, conservation, animal behavior, physiology, and sociological aspects. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures and panel discussions by faculty from Oceans, Biology, and other departments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: Gilly, W. (PI)

OCEANS 12N: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals (BIO 12N)

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

OCEANS 112: Oceans and the Global Imaginary (GLOBAL 112, GLOBAL 212, OCEANS 212)

This course brings together various social, climatic, and ecological perspectives to seek a better understanding of the relationships between people and the sea. Our oceans constitute some 70% of the surface area of our planet; they connect continents, countless islands, and form a universal link between geographically vast regions and culturally diverse peoples. Our oceans are critical to the health of our planet, and to humanity, and it is this interdependent relationship that forms the basis of this course.Taking a genuinely global viewpoint, we will explore the dynamic nature of peoples' interactions with their maritime landscape and seascape. The course will draw on a wide range of social science and natural science data and approaches to assess how we traversed and explored the seas; how the seas have been an enduring source of nutrition; and how they have come to garner immense social and cultural significance to peoples around the world. The course looks at the unique features more »
This course brings together various social, climatic, and ecological perspectives to seek a better understanding of the relationships between people and the sea. Our oceans constitute some 70% of the surface area of our planet; they connect continents, countless islands, and form a universal link between geographically vast regions and culturally diverse peoples. Our oceans are critical to the health of our planet, and to humanity, and it is this interdependent relationship that forms the basis of this course.Taking a genuinely global viewpoint, we will explore the dynamic nature of peoples' interactions with their maritime landscape and seascape. The course will draw on a wide range of social science and natural science data and approaches to assess how we traversed and explored the seas; how the seas have been an enduring source of nutrition; and how they have come to garner immense social and cultural significance to peoples around the world. The course looks at the unique features of the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans, using case studies from each, while drawing lines that connect these vast oceanic basins. Ultimately, the course emphasizes the challenges facing our oceans as humanity's impact reaches unprecedented levels and considers how `people and oceans in partnership' might help mitigate the damage climate change has wrought on our planet.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

OCEANS 129C: A Deep Dive Into the Indian Ocean: From Prehistory to the Modern Day (ANTHRO 129C, ANTHRO 229C, ARCHLGY 129C, OCEANS 229C)

The Indian Ocean has formed an enduring connection between three continents, countless small islands and a multitude of cultural and ethnic groups and has become the focus of increasing interest in this geographically vast and culturally diverse region. This course explores a range of topics and issues, from the nature and dynamics of colonization and cultural development as a way of understanding the human experience in this part of the world, to topics such as religion, disease, and heritage The course guides studies in the many ways in which research in the Indian Ocean has a direct impact on our ability to compare developments in the Atlantic and Pacific. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

OCEANS 198H: Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. Formerly BIOHOPK 198H.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 75 units total)

OCEANS 199H: Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

OCEANS 212: Oceans and the Global Imaginary (GLOBAL 112, GLOBAL 212, OCEANS 112)

This course brings together various social, climatic, and ecological perspectives to seek a better understanding of the relationships between people and the sea. Our oceans constitute some 70% of the surface area of our planet; they connect continents, countless islands, and form a universal link between geographically vast regions and culturally diverse peoples. Our oceans are critical to the health of our planet, and to humanity, and it is this interdependent relationship that forms the basis of this course.Taking a genuinely global viewpoint, we will explore the dynamic nature of peoples' interactions with their maritime landscape and seascape. The course will draw on a wide range of social science and natural science data and approaches to assess how we traversed and explored the seas; how the seas have been an enduring source of nutrition; and how they have come to garner immense social and cultural significance to peoples around the world. The course looks at the unique features of the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans, using case studies from each, while drawing lines that connect these vast oceanic basins. Ultimately, the course emphasizes the challenges facing our oceans as humanity's impact reaches unprecedented levels and considers how `people and oceans in partnership' might help mitigate the damage climate change has wrought on our planet.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

OCEANS 229C: A Deep Dive Into the Indian Ocean: From Prehistory to the Modern Day (ANTHRO 129C, ANTHRO 229C, ARCHLGY 129C, OCEANS 129C)

The Indian Ocean has formed an enduring connection between three continents, countless small islands and a multitude of cultural and ethnic groups and has become the focus of increasing interest in this geographically vast and culturally diverse region. This course explores a range of topics and issues, from the nature and dynamics of colonization and cultural development as a way of understanding the human experience in this part of the world, to topics such as religion, disease, and heritage The course guides studies in the many ways in which research in the Indian Ocean has a direct impact on our ability to compare developments in the Atlantic and Pacific. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

OCEANS 275: Nitrogen in the Marine Environment (ESS 275)

The goal of this seminar course is to explore current topics in marine nitrogen cycle. We will explore a variety of processes, including primary production, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation, and their controls. We will use the book Nitrogen in the Marine Environment and supplement with student-led discussions of recent literature. A variety of biomes, spatial and temporal scales, and methodologies for investigation will be discussed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

OCEANS 298H: Directed Instruction or Reading (New)

Directed reading and research on a subject of mutual interest to student and faculty member. Student must clarify deliverables, units, and grading basis with faculty member before applicable deadlines. This course is for advanced graduate students only.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 75 units total)
Instructors: Crowder, L. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints