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381 - 390 of 445 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 349: Anthropology of Capitalism

This advanced graduate seminar explores capitalism as an historically-situated and culturally-mediated articulation of practices rather than as an economic system or social structure governed by an internal logic. It draws on poststructural theories of culture, society and subjectivity to investigate the processes through which diverse capitalist practices are produced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology or permission of the instructor. Previous graduate level coursework in cultural anthropology, social theory or cultural studies is required. No auditing is permitted. Enrollment limited to 12.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 349A: Advanced Archaeological Field Methods: A Practical Approach to Working With and Within Communities

This is a graduate level course (open to undergraduates with permission) in archaeological field methods at several archaeological and cultural sites in the San Francisco Bay area. This is a practical course designed to help students identify potential archaeological sites (using GIS) historical maps, historical archives and extant site reports. Students will gain hands-on experience with mapping, field survey and strategies and methods of field excavation. Study of local artifact types and lab techniques for artifact cleaning and identification and written analysis. The course emphasizes a community based model of archaeology, working with members of local indigenous cultures. The seminar will begin with readings and classroom instruction and proceed to the field. Students will be required to hike to field sites and conduct experiments using a variety of equipment, recording devices and strategies. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ANTHRO 350A: Writing as Intervention: Science, Medicine, and Ethics in Today's World

In this course we will explore contemporary issues of culture and power rooted in science, medicine, technology and futurist proposals to better the human condition with technological fixes. We will investigate anthropological and ethnographic-based theories and methods to propose alternative ethical solutions. These readings will be rooted in examining global stratification, economic metrics of progress, and the routinization of human degradation ranging from norms around sexual power, labor exploits, privacy infringements, data sharing, and automation.nnThe course will be structured as a writing workshop with frequent, short writing assignments to be shared with others in the course. The workshop format will facilitate the course goal of each student producing at least one publishable op-ed, article or other product of intervention at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ANTHRO 351: The Ordinary: The History of a Concept

The ordinary has today acquired something like a cultic status in contemporary culture. `Ordinary¿ citizens are the touchstone and essence of political democracy; the holy grail of effective marketing, the byword for earthy ethical judgment. In social science, the ordinary has blended in with the `normal¿ and the statistical mean. In Anthropology, ordinary life has all but replaced `cultural practice¿ as the epistemic gold standard of evidence. But this was not always so, and the ordinary has many, varied and contradictory meanings across the world.nThis course will (a) trace the historical emergence of the ordinary as a central ideological and metaphysical concept in modern thought and practice; (b) trace how the ordinary and the everyday have acquired unprecedented authority in anthropology; (3) trace the varies meanings and connotations of `the ordinary¿ in different socio-historical contexts from Asia, Africa and Euro-America.nThe literature will consist of ethnographies, and works of philosophical and historical scholarship.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ANTHRO 352: Foucault: The Question of Method

Foucault as methodological exemplar for historical and social research. Emphasis is on his historical studies of clinical medicine, prisons, and sexuality, and on applying his methods to empirical studies of topics such as colonialism, race, and liberal governmental rationality.

ANTHRO 353: Landscape

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of landscape, noting the various processes and projects that have help create them. Readings draw together a broad range of theoretical approaches that are attentive to human-non-human interactions and the overlapping and divergent spatial and temporal questions of the exchanges between landscapes and humans. The readings will also draw attention to representational and non-representational ways that material and symbolic aspects of landscapes help constitute the making of place. The aim of the seminar is to explore the various methodologies for what they offer for the study of place.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

ANTHRO 355: Cities in Global Perspective

Interdisciplinary approach to examining global cities. The concept of the global city, and the interdependent processes that help produce urban spaces. Situating the transformation of urban spaces within globalization and its differential effects; current explanatory frameworks that pay attention to multiple scales of spatial and economic articulation. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2012

ANTHRO 356: The Anthropology of Development

Multidisciplinary. Topics vary annually. Areas include Africa, S. Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 356A: The Universal and the Vernacular. The Global Life of Concepts and Social Forms

Mapping and understanding vernacular concepts and terminologies has always been central to the anthropological quest to understand societies from `a native point of view'. This has often been accompanied by a critique of universalist and Euro-centric assumptions in the social sciences and in social theory. As a result, the convention has become to treat the `universal¿ (ideas, frames, institutions) as external, often imposed by colonial powers, while the `vernacular¿ conventionally is seen as local and authentic, and the proper site of anthropology.nThis course seeks to rethink this spatial and historical distinction between the universal and the vernacular. Instead we ask: how, and when, do concepts, or practices, become embedded in a vernacular world? Reversely, instead of assuming that universals all originate in Euro-America, we ask: how do concepts and practices become both global and universal? We will trace how impactful ideologies, social forms and institutions have travelled in time to become perceived as elements of vernacular cultures. nDrawing on ethnographic and historical examples across the world, each week will trace the universal and vernacular lives of important concepts such as: `tradition¿, `the individual¿, `community¿, `the people¿; `humanity¿, `dignity¿; `equality¿, `sacrifice¿, `cosmopolitanism¿, `civility¿.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Hansen, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 357: Other Minds: Puzzles in Psychiatric and Psychological Anthropology

Problems in the way anthropologists explore other minds anthropologically and the ways in which anthropologists seek to understand the models of other minds held by the people observed. Topics include theory of mind, witchcraft, belief, empathy, psychosis, trauma, Freud, Vygotsky, and cognitive dissonance. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Under grads cannot take this class without permission of the instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2010
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