2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

21 - 28 of 28 results for: CSRE

CSRE 200X: CSRE Senior Seminar

Supports the conceptualization, research, and writing of the CCSRE senior paper with the support of a faculty project advisor. Required for CCSRE majors in their senior year who are not completing a CCSRE honors project, including those who opt to write honors theses in other departments and programs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Dinh, T. (PI)

CSRE 201X: CCSRE Honors Seminar

Supports the research and writing of the CCSRE honors thesis with the support of a faculty project advisor and a secondary reader. Required for all admitted students completing an honors project in CCSRE, regardless of major.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

CSRE 224: Asian American Racialization in Education (ASNAMST 224, EDUC 224)

This course examines how race and other social processes in education have shaped understandings of the racial category of "Asian American." Students will investigate how education as a social institution makes, remakes, and challenges racial narratives about Asian Americans, as well as implications for the U.S. racial structure. Drawing upon research in Education, Sociology, and Asian American Studies, we interrogate assumptions about Asian Americans' educational success. Selected topics include parental engagement, race/ethnicity intersections, higher education, social class, and community organizing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

CSRE 264S: Race, Gender, Justice (COMPLIT 264T, FEMGEN 264S, TAPS 264S)

The question of justice animates some of the most influential classics and contemporary plays in the dramatic canon. We will examine the relationship between state laws and kinship obligations in Sophocles's Antigone. We will trace the transnational circulation of this text and its adaptations in Gambaro's Argentinian Antigona Furiosa, and Fugard and Kani's South African The Island. We will read Shakespeare's Othello and consider questions of racism, misogyny, and intimate partner violence, investigate the reverberations of these themes in the OJ Simpson trial, and explore its afterlife in Toni Morrison's Desdemona. We will take up questions of sexual violence via John Patrick Shanley's Doubt and Ariel Dorfman's Chilean classic, Death and the Maiden. We will examine themes of police brutality and racial vulnerability in Anna Deavere Smith's Twilight and Aleshea Harris's What to Send Up When it Goes Down. Through close readings of plays, we will explore the inter-articulation of intimac more »
The question of justice animates some of the most influential classics and contemporary plays in the dramatic canon. We will examine the relationship between state laws and kinship obligations in Sophocles's Antigone. We will trace the transnational circulation of this text and its adaptations in Gambaro's Argentinian Antigona Furiosa, and Fugard and Kani's South African The Island. We will read Shakespeare's Othello and consider questions of racism, misogyny, and intimate partner violence, investigate the reverberations of these themes in the OJ Simpson trial, and explore its afterlife in Toni Morrison's Desdemona. We will take up questions of sexual violence via John Patrick Shanley's Doubt and Ariel Dorfman's Chilean classic, Death and the Maiden. We will examine themes of police brutality and racial vulnerability in Anna Deavere Smith's Twilight and Aleshea Harris's What to Send Up When it Goes Down. Through close readings of plays, we will explore the inter-articulation of intimacy and violence, intimidation and transgression, vengeance and forgiveness within the context of larger struggles for gender and racial justice. We will read plays in light of contemporary reckonings with the US criminal justice system: the #MeToo movement and the Black Lives Matter movement. While the former appeals to the criminal justice system to restore victims¿ rights, the latter urges a thorough dismantling of the carceral state. How do we understand these divergent responses to augment or abolish punitive structures? Meets WM requirement for TAPS.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP

CSRE 301A: Graduate Workshop: Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Required for PhD Minors in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE) and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (FGSS). The Fall Phd Minor Workshop will explore theory and methods in anti-racist and feminist pedagogy through selected readings and discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

CSRE 340: (Re)Meditating Systems Change: Disability, Language & Difference (EDUC 440, PEDS 240)

This is a course about gaining a deep understanding of the levers of systems change in K-12 education focusing especially on (re)mediating systems in ways that center inclusion, equity, and justice. This course is concerned with systems change processes: why we need them; what they look like; and what theories can be called upon to guide them. We will examine the role of educational reform processes. We will examine various conceptions how reform efforts bear on systems change efforts at all levels of education: the classroom, the school, the district, and the state and federal levels of educational policy. In this course, we will examine contemporary theories of educational systems change that pay close attention to Disability, Language, and Difference. We will consider some examples of how these change processes interact to improve academic and social outcomes for all students, especially those who have been historically marginalized. We will consider urban, suburban, and rural appli more »
This is a course about gaining a deep understanding of the levers of systems change in K-12 education focusing especially on (re)mediating systems in ways that center inclusion, equity, and justice. This course is concerned with systems change processes: why we need them; what they look like; and what theories can be called upon to guide them. We will examine the role of educational reform processes. We will examine various conceptions how reform efforts bear on systems change efforts at all levels of education: the classroom, the school, the district, and the state and federal levels of educational policy. In this course, we will examine contemporary theories of educational systems change that pay close attention to Disability, Language, and Difference. We will consider some examples of how these change processes interact to improve academic and social outcomes for all students, especially those who have been historically marginalized. We will consider urban, suburban, and rural applications of these processes, as major sources of evidence for what works and what fails. We will consider the "big picture" of our society, its values, and its economic position in a global economy to better understand why the need for systems change, which may seem obvious, is so difficult to achieve in practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 36 units total)

CSRE 350G: Performing Race, Gender, and Sexuality (ARTSINST 150G, CSRE 150G, FEMGEN 150G, LIFE 150G, TAPS 150G)

In this theory and practice-based course, students will examine performances by and scholarly texts about artists who critically and mindfully engage race, gender, and sexuality. Students will cultivate their skills as artist-scholars through written assignments and the creation of performances in response to the assigned material. Attendance and written reflection about a live performance event on campus are required. Students will also learn various meditation practices as tools for making and critiquing performance, in both our seminar discussions and performance workshops. We will approach mindfulness as method and theory in our own practice, as well as in relation to the works studied. We will also consider the ethics and current debates concerning the mindfulness industry. Examples of artists studied include James Luna, Nao Bustamante, Renee Cox, William Pope.L, Cassils, boychild, Curious, Adrian Piper, Xandra Ibarra, Valérie Reding, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, and Ana Mendieta.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Otalvaro, G. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints