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141 - 150 of 294 results for: all courses

HISTORY 198: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 98. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) This course charts major historical transformations in modern China, and will be of interest to those concerned with Chinese politics, culture, society, ethnicity, economy, gender, international relations, and the future of the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

HISTORY 201: From Confederate Monuments to Wikipedia: The Politics of Remembering the Past

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases issues and careers in public history with guest speakers.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 204E: Totalitarianism (HISTORY 307E)

This course analyzes the evolution and nature of revolutionary and totalitarian polities through the reading of monographs on the Puritan Reformation, French Revolutionary, turn of the 20th Century, interwar, and Second World War eras. Among topics explored are the essence of modern ideology and politics, the concept of the body national and social, the modern state, state terror, charismatic leadership, private and public spheres, totalitarian economies, and identities and practices in totalitarian polities.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

HISTORY 210: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 310)

( History 210 is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 310 is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 228: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 243C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 343C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 243G: Tobacco and Health in World History (HISTORY 343G)

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 279: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 379)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)

HUMBIO 2B: Culture, Evolution, and Society

Introduction to the evolutionary study of human diversity. Hominid evolution, the origins of social complexity, social theory, population dynamics, the impact of disease on societies and the emergence of the modern world system, emphasizing the concept of culture and its influence on human differences. HUMBIO 2B, with HUMBIO 3B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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