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231 - 240 of 573 results for: all courses

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

(Course is offered for 3 OR 5 units.) Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 1C: Global History: Modern Times

History 1C explores the making of our modern world. It investigates the interconnectednhistories of revolution, war, imperialism, migration, race, slavery, democracy, rebellion, nnationalism, feminism, socialism, fascism, genocide, anti-colonialism, neoliberalism, and npopulist authoritarianism. Analyzing memoirs, novels, films, and other sources, we will ninvestigate how key political ideas have transformed societies, cultures, and economies nacross the globe from the late eighteenth century through to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 33A: Blood and Roses: The Age of the Tudors

(Same as HISTORY 133A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 133A.) English society and state from the Wars of the Roses to the death of Elizabeth. Political, social, and cultural upheavals of the Tudor period and the changes wrought by the Reformation. The establishment of the Tudor monarchy; destruction of the Catholic church; rise of Puritanism; and 16th-century social and economic changes.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

HISTORY 34A: European Witch Hunts

(Same as HISTORY 134A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 134A.) After the Reformation, in the midst of state building and scientific discovery, Europeans conducted a series of deadly witch hunts, violating their own laws and procedures in the process. What was it about early modernity that fueled witch hunting? Witch trials and early modern demonology as well as historians' interpretations of events to seek answers to this question.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

( History 39 is offered for 3 units; History 139 is offered for 5 units.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 42S: The Circle of Life: Visions of Nature in Modern Science, Religion, Politics and Culture

A new understanding of nature emerged in the 1700s that fundamentally altered our perception of the living world and humanity's relationship with it. By tracing the evolution of this understanding forward, we gain insight into the interactions among science, religion, politics and culture. Topics include: nature in Romantic science, poetry and art; Darwin's theory of evolution and its afterlife in science, literature and popular culture; the science and politics of the 20th-century environmental movement; and the philosophical presuppositions underlying modern debates about biodiversity. In addition to close readings of canonical texts and contemporary commentaries, students will be introduced to digital history methods. Students will design their own final projects in consultation with the instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 44Q: Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (FEMGEN 44Q)

Explores ¿Gendered Innovations¿ or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores ¿Gendered Innovations.¿ Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. This course fulfills the second level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (WRITE 2) and emphasizes oral, multimedia presentation, and writing skills. Each student will develop a case study illustrating how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis can lead to innovation and enhance social equalities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2

HISTORY 48: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 148)

This course traces the emergence and development of the distinctive cultural world of the ancient Egyptians over nearly 4,000 years. Through archaeological and textual evidence, we will investigate the social structures, religious beliefs, and expressive traditions that framed life and death in this extraordinary region. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bartos, N. (PI)

HISTORY 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (AFRICAAM 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2
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