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21 - 30 of 277 results for: all courses

BIO 25Q: Cystic fibrosis: from medical conundrum to precision medicine success story

The class will explore cystic fibrosis (CF), the most prevalent fatal genetic disease in the US, as a scientific and medical whodunit. Through reading and discussion of medical and scientific literature, we will tackle questions that include: how was life expectancy with CF increased from weeks to decades without understanding the disease mechanism? Why is the disease so prevalent? Is there an advantage to being a carrier? Is CF a single disease or a continuum of physiological variation; or- what is a disease? How did research into CF lead to discovery of the underlying cause of most other genetic diseases as well? Through critical reading of the scientific and medical literature, class discussion, field trips and meetings with genetic counselors, caregivers, patients, physicians and researchers, we will work to build a deep understanding of this disease, from the biochemical basis to the current controversies over pathogenic mechanisms, treatment strategies and the ethics and economics of genetic testing and astronomical drug costs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 30: Ecology for Everyone

Ecology is the science of interactions and the changes they generate. This project-based course links individual behavior, population growth, species interactions, and ecosystem function. Introduction to measurement, observation, experimental design and hypothesis testing in field projects. The goal is to learn to think analytically about everyday ecological processes, including those that you participate in, which involve bacteria, fungi, plants, animals and humans. The course uses basic statistics to analyze data; there are no math prerequisites except arithmetic. Open to everyone, including those who may be headed for more advanced courses in ecology and environmental science. The online version will meet synchronously and involve preparation outside of class for interactive discussions during class time. We will organize field projects that you can do wherever you are. Projects begin in the first week of the quarter. For questions please contact Prof. Gordon at dmgordon@stanford.edu.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 35N: Catching up with Traditional Ecological Knowledge

This Introductory Seminar will explore the consequences of climate change on ecological communities, focusing on two emerging concepts: "disequilibrium," which emphasizes that it can take long time for communities to respond to climate change because of species interactions, and "historical contingency," which proposes that the order in which species invade and disappear as communities re-assemble in response to climate change will determine which species will persist. The seminar will involve lecture, discussion, writing, and visit to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Fukami, T. (PI)

BIO 60: Problem solving in infectious disease

Why is Lyme disease spreading? How does HIV become drug resistant? How do other animals affect our disease risk? In BIO 60 students will examine actual case studies to experience how different scientific approaches are used to battle infectious disease. They will evaluate information presented in the popular media and the scientific literature, and will directly participate in the scientific process through hands-on collection, documentation and analyses of authentic scientific data. Students will cultivate their scientific curiosity by discovering the natural world with a Foldscope, the `origami paper microscope¿ ( https://microcosmos.foldscope.com). Students will build critical thinking skills by creating hypotheses, and designing experiments that pertain to problems in infectious disease. Students will work in teams to expand their thinking and will practice communicating science to different audiences.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 61: Science as a Creative Process (APPPHYS 61)

What is the process of science, and why does creativity matter? We'll delve deeply into the applicability of science in addressing a vast range of real-world problems. This course is designed to teach the scientific method as it's actually practiced by working scientists. It will cover how to ask a well-posed question, how to design a good experiment, how to collect and interpret quantitative data, how to recover from error, and how to communicate findings. Facts matter! Course topics will include experimental design, statistics and statistical significance, formulating appropriate controls, modeling, peer review, and more. The course will incorporate a significant hands-on component featuring device fabrication, testing, and measurement. Among other "Dorm Science" activities, we'll be distributing Arduino microcontroller kits and electronic sensors, then use these items, along with other materials, to complete a variety of group and individual projects outside the classroom. The final course assignment will be to develop and write a scientific grant proposal to test a student-selected myth or scientific controversy. Although helpful, no prior experience with electronics or computer programming is required. Recommended for freshmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIO 81: Introduction to Ecology

This course will introduce you to the first principles of the science of ecology, the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA

BIO 82: Genetics

The focus of the course is on the basic mechanisms underlying the transmission of genetic information and on the use of genetic analysis to study biological and medical questions. Major topics will include: (1) the use of existing genetic variation in humans and other species to identify genes that play an important role in determining traits and disease-susceptibility, (2) the analysis of mutations in model organisms and their use in the investigation of biological processes and questions and (3) using genetic information for diagnosis and the potential for genetic manipulations to treat disease. Prerequisites: None, but BIO 83 is recommended. For 2021, Live Zoom lectures will be recorded and posted on Canvas for students with conflicts. Attendance at a discussion section held once a week is mandatory. For logistical questions about the course, please contact Waheeda Khalfan (wkhalfan@stanford.edu).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 83: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Introduction to the molecular and biochemical basis of life. Lecture topics include the structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates, energy metabolism, signal transduction, epigenetics and DNA repair. The course will also consider how defects in these processes cause disease. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA, WAY-SMA

BIO 84: Physiology

The focus of Physiology is on understanding how organisms tackle the physical challenges of life on Earth. This course will provide an overview of animal and plant physiology and teach an understanding of how organisms maintain homeostasis, respond to environmental cues and coordinate behaviors across multiples tissues and organ systems. We will examine the structure and function of organs and organ systems and how those systems are controlled and regulated to maintain homeostasis. Control and regulation requires information as does the ability to respond to environmental stimuli, so we will give special consideration to hormonal and neural information systems. We will also be concerned with the interactions and integration of the activities of the different organ systems we study. Prerequisites: none. For 2021, Live Zoom lectures will be recorded and posted on Canvas for students with conflicts. Attendance at a discussion section held once a week is mandatory. There will be no exams in the course. For logistical questions about the course, please contact Waheeda Khalfan (wkhalfan@stanford.edu).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 85: Evolution

Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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