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1 - 4 of 4 results for: EE 65

EE 65: Modern Physics for Engineers

This course introduces the core ideas of modern physics that enable applications ranging from solar energy and efficient lighting to the modern electronic and optical devices and nanotechnologies that sense, process, store, communicate and display all our information. Though the ideas have broad impact, the course is widely accessible to engineering and science students with only basic linear algebra and calculus through simple ordinary differential equations as mathematics background. Topics include the quantum mechanics of electrons and photons (Schrödinger's equation, atoms, electrons, energy levels and energy bands; absorption and emission of photons; quantum confinement in nanostructures), the statistical mechanics of particles (entropy, the Boltzmann factor, thermal distributions), the thermodynamics of light (thermal radiation, limits to light concentration, spontaneous and stimulated emission), and the physics of information (Maxwell¿s demon, reversibility, entropy and noise in physics and information theory). Pre-requisite: Physics 41. Pre- or co-requisite: Math 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

EE 116: Semiconductor Device Physics

The fundamental operation of semiconductor devices and overview of applications. The physical principles of semiconductors, both silicon and compound materials; operating principles and device equations for junction devices (diodes, bipolar transistor, photo-detectors). Introduction to quantum effects and band theory of solids. Recommended corequisites: EE 65 and EE 101B. Non-EE majors are encouraged to take ENGR 40 before EE 116.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

EE 136: Introduction to Nanophotonics and Nanostructures

Electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves and semiconductors. Confining these waves, and devices employing such confinement. Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires, and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves and semiconductors at the level of EE 42 and EE 65 or equivalent.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

EE 222: Applied Quantum Mechanics I

Emphasis is on applications in modern devices and systems. Topics include: Schrödinger's equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, solutions of simple problems including quantum wells and tunneling, quantum harmonic oscillator, coherent states, operator approach to quantum mechanics, Dirac notation, angular momentum, hydrogen atom, calculation techniques including matrix diagonalization, perturbation theory, variational method, and time-dependent perturbation theory with applications to optical absorption, nonlinear optical coefficients, and Fermi's golden rule. Prerequisites: MATH 52 and 53, EE 65 or PHYSICS 65 (or PHYSICS 43 and 45).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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