2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

71 - 80 of 228 results for: SOC

SOC 168: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 268)

We learn how to apply analytical tools from the social sciences to organizations, and study how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. A variety of organizations are included and how they deal with strategy changes and accountability. The theme for this year's class is on accountability of non-profit organizations such as Doctors Without Borders, The International Rescue Committee and The Red Cross. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-EDP

SOC 169: Introduction to Intersectionality (AFRICAAM 169B, FEMGEN 169)

"Intersectionality" is so popular, it's almost impossible to avoid: it was added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in 2017, it was painted on signs at the Women's Marches, and it guides modern day social movement organizers. But what does intersectionality mean? What can intersectionality offer And what does it mean for research and social movements to be truly intersectional? The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the concept of intersectionality. First, we will delve into the works (chiefly from Black feminist scholars) that provide the foundation for today's concept of intersectionality. We will then explore, compare, and critique sociological research that applies (or fails to apply) an intersectional lens to its objects of study. Finally, we will investigate the use of intersectionality in social movements and outside academia. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

SOC 170: Classics of Modern Social Theory (SOC 270)

(Graduate students register for 270). Sociologists seek to understand how society works, specifically: how social life is organized, changed, and maintained. Sociological theory provides hypotheses for explaining social life. All empirical research in sociology is enriched by, and has some basis in, sociological theories. This course introduces students to the earliest sociological theories and the thinkers who developed them. Specifically, we will discuss the work of W.E.B. Du Bois, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Karl Marx. We will compare and contrast how they thought about important modern-day social realities such as capitalism, racism, crime, religion, and social cohesion. We will consider how these early theories and thinkers influence the way sociologists think about and study the social world today.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 172: Computational Social Science

This course introduces students to computational social science from a sociological perspective, grounding popular computational methods such as text mining and network analysis in sociological theory. While the course is open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students from any discipline, the materials will be primarily sourced from sociology. Students with no prior computer science experience will find this course a menu of potential methodologies for future research, while students with some programming experience or with a pre-existing research question can use this course to advance their research projects. By framing these methods in sociological theory, students will gain a more critical understanding of why scientists select these methods and how computational methods impact society.
Last offered: Spring 2019

SOC 173: Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives (EDUC 173, EDUC 273, FEMGEN 173, SOC 273)

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies interact with gender, gender identity, and other characteristics in the United States, around the world, and over time. Attention is paid to how changes in those structures and policies relate to access to, experiences in, and outcomes of higher education by gender. Students can expect to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and feminist scholarship and pedagogy.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

SOC 174: Social Computing (CS 278, SOC 274)

Today we interact with our friends and enemies, our team partners and romantic partners, and our organizations and societies, all through computational systems. How do we design these social computing systems to be effective and responsible? This course covers design patterns for social computing systems and the foundational ideas that underpin them. Students will engage in the creation of new computationally-mediated social environments. Course available for 3-4 units; students enrolling in the 4-unit option will conduct deeper engagement with the topic via additional readings and discussions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

SOC 176: The Social Life of Neighborhoods (AFRICAAM 76B, CSRE 176B, SOC 276, URBANST 179)

How do neighborhoods come to be? How and why do they change? What is the role of power, money, race, immigration, segregation, culture, government, and other forces? In this course, students will interrogate these questions using literatures from sociology, geography, and political science, along with archival, observational, interview, and cartographic (GIS) methods. Students will work in small groups to create content (e.g., images, audio, and video) for a self-guided ¿neighborhood tour,¿ which will be added to a mobile app and/or website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 177: The Sociology of Popular Culture

Why do some songs become popular, but not others? Why are music genres that were wildly popular in the 1950s no longer popular today? Trends and fads and can be found nearly everywhere in our daily lives movie tropes, skirt lengths, styles of shoes, internet memes, hot stock-picks all of these go in and out of fashion. But, why should they? Did something change? And if so¿what? This course seeks to understand how and why things become (un)popular. The course begins with early 20th century theories on the massification and commodification of culture and traces development of this literature over time. Topics covered include propaganda, social influence, and significant responses to questions such as: What constitutes high/low culture? Does popular culture manifest--"from the bottom-up", for the people by the people--or is popular culture dictated--"from the top down", by elites and commercial interests? To what extent do social networks (and the status and power of the people within them) influence these relationships? How is popular culture received, interpreted, and used? Today, the media landscape looks significantly different than it did in the early 20th century, and in the final portion of the course we will consider the extent to which new technologies, media platforms, hyper-focused advertising, and cluster-based similarity algorithms have impacted the way we think about and answer these questions. In the final portion of the course, we will critically examine active and ongoing debates in the literature related to this question and produce a final paper that contributes to the discussion. No final exam.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

SOC 178: The Politics of Inequality (POLISCI 147P, PUBLPOL 247)

This course is about the distribution of power in contemporary democratic societies, and especially in the US: who governs? Is there a ``power elite,'' whose preferences dominate public policy making? Or, does policy reflect a wide range of interests? What is the relationship between income and power? What are the political consequences of increasing income inequality? How do income differences across racial and ethnic groups affect the quality of their representation? What are effective remedies for unequal influence? Finally, which institutions move democratic practice furthest towards full democratic equality? This course will address these questions, focusing first on local distributions of power, and then considering the implications of inequality in state and national politics. nStudents will have the opportunity to study income inequality using income and labor force surveys in a mid-term assignment. Then, in a final paper, students will conduct an empirical examination of the implications of income inequality for American democracy.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 179A: Crime and Punishment in America (AFRICAAM 179A, CSRE 179A, SOC 279A)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the way crime has been defined and punished in the United States. Recent social movements such as the Movement for Black Lives have drawn attention to the problem of mass incarceration and officer-involved shootings of people of color. These movements have underscored the centrality of the criminal justice system in defining citizenship, race, and democracy in America. How did our country get here? This course provides a social scientific perspective on America¿s past and present approach to crime and punishment. Readings and discussions focus on racism in policing, court processing, and incarceration; the social construction of crime and violence; punishment among the privileged; the collateral consequences of punishment in poor communities of color; and normative debates about social justice, racial justice, and reforming the criminal justice system. Students will learn to gather their own knowledge and contribute to normative debates through a field report assignment and an op-ed writing assignment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints