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71 - 80 of 175 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 243N: Beyond Words: Early Books and the Design of the Reading Experience

Copiously drawing from the Stanford Archives, this seminar will study the revolutionary design of the first printed books to ask questions about the nature of reading and the commodification of culture. Besides being trained in typography and printing techniques, the students will explore early modern books as multi-layered objects in which texts, images, cutouts, colors, and a multitude of materials constructed new frameworks for attention and fantasies while contributing to the globalization of media.

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law (SIW 245)

This course examines art at the intersection of business and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on how the issues raised by particular case studies, whether legal, ethical and/or financial, impact our understanding of how works of art circulate, are received, evaluated and acquire different meanings in given social contexts. Topics include the design, construction and contested signification of selected war memorials; the rights involved in the display and desecration of the American flag; censorship of sexually charged images; how the value of art is appraised; institutional critique and the art museum, among others.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 246N: Pacific Dreams: Art in California

This course will explore the rich history of art in California from 1850-present. From Chiura Obata¿s exquisite views of Yosemite to ASCO¿s urgent political performances in the streets of Los Angeles, artists have engaged California¿s landscape, history, and diverse populations in myriad ways. Topics of study will include art in San Francisco Chinatown, Hollywood and contemporary art, psychedelia and the counterculture, African American performance and Afrofuturism, and punk rock in Los Angeles. Special attention will be paid to issues of immigration, race, and ethnicity in California. The course will include multiple museum visits and trips to important artistic sites in the Bay Area.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARTHIST 252A: Art and Power: From Royal Spectacle to Revolutionary Ritual (FRENCH 252)

From the Palace of Versailles to grand operas to Jacques-Louis David's portraits of revolutionary martyrs, rarely have the arts been so powerfully mobilized by the State as in early modern France. This course examines how the arts were used from Louis XIV to the Revolution in order to broadcast political authority across Europe. We will also consider the resistance to such attempts to elicit shock-and-awe through artistic patronage. By studying music, architecture, garden design, the visual arts, and theater together, students will gain a new perspective on works of art in their political contexts. But we will also examine the libelous pamphlets and satirical cartoons that turned the monarchy¿s grandeur against itself, ending the course with an examination of the new artistic regime of the French Revolution. The course will be taught in English with the option of French readings for departmental majors.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ARTHIST 256: What Was Photography? (ARTHIST 456)

Digital imaging has largely replaced darkroom work over the past quarter century, yet analog practices still dominate theories of photography. Working closely with the Capital Group Foundation Collection at the Cantor, this class will explore how those theories relate to vintage photographic prints and whether they are still relevant to the photography being produced today. Students will select one photographer within the Collection and create a set of writings that help contemporary viewers see these mid-century American artists through diverse contemporary perspectives.

ARTHIST 264B: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (AMSTUD 143X, FILMSTUD 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kessler, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 265A: Word and Image (ARTHIST 465A, COMPLIT 225, ITALIAN 265, ITALIAN 365)

What impact do images have on our reading of a text? How do words influence our understanding of images or our reading of pictures? What makes a visual interpretation of written words or a verbal rendering of an image successful? These questions will guide our investigation of the manifold connections between words and images in this course on intermediality and the relations and interrelations between writing and art from classical antiquity to the present. Readings and discussions will include such topics as the life and afterlife in word and image of Ovid's "Metamorphoses," Dante's "Divine Comedy," Ludovico Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso," and John Milton's "Paradise Lost;" the writings and creative production of poet-artists Michelangelo Buonarroti, William Blake, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti; innovations in and correspondences between literature and art in the modern period, from symbolism in the nineteenth century through the flourishing of European avant-garde movements in the twentieth century.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 268: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 468)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 273N: What is Contemporary Art?

This course focuses on the production, criticism, and curating of contemporary art. Through a series of required readings, intensive class discussions, class trips, and first-hand encounters with art objects and exhibitions, we will investigate current understandings of contemporary art. We will also consider the history of contemporary art by looking at how art of the past was understood in its own moment, when it was new and now.

ARTHIST 280B: The World of Chen Hongshou (1598-1652) (ARTHIST 480B)

Planned to coincide with a special international exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum of works by the seventeenth century figure painter and print designer Chen Hongshou (1598-1652), this seminar will explore his art and cultural environment. Along with close study of his original paintings, we will study his connections with printmaking and publishing, fiction and drama culture, and his literary, social and patronage networks.
Last offered: Autumn 2017
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