2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

231 - 240 of 296 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 419: The Poetics of Softness

This seminar probes the meaning of softness in the theory and practice of early modern Southern European art. As this seminar will investigate, softness is intrinsically tied to the creative process, to the challenges of visualization and art making. What does it mean for a sculptor to depict fingers digging into marble flesh? How did the painter rise to the challenge of depicting subtle forms - clouds, atmosphere, the beating pulse, hair and animal fur? Why were some of the first histories of art relayed as the progression from hard to soft forms? Through the investigation of the concepts and artworks of artists such as Leonardo, Giorgione, Raphael, Correggio, and Bernini, this seminar will explore softness as an aesthetic category. Materiality, enlivenment, perfection and imperfection in art theory, old-age style, and the ekphrastic tradition will be topics of particular interest. Participants are invited to pursue research papers in their fields of specialty.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 420: Art and Invisibility: The Dissemblance of Labour.

Labor has been at the center of political and philosophical analyses from Jean-Jacques Rousseau to Simone Weil. While uncovering essential stages in the conceptualization of labor--is labor work? How does it differ from process?--this course reframes the question of the nature of labor and artmaking in relation to invisibility. How come entire stages of production have disappeared from history? How have patrons, builders, and artists managed to erase their presence from their artifacts? To what extent do art historical narratives still pursue ideologies of exclusion or, at least, of carelessness when they get to who did what? By pairing specific case studies from the eleventh to the twentieth centuries with select passages from A-list thinkers of labor (Agamben, Arendt, Aristotle), this course offers both a history of a troublesome concept and a series of opportunities to rethink the agendas of a discipline that has often turned a blind eye to specific aspects of making. Interdisciplinary in spirit--we focus on select groups of paintings, buildings, organizations, and co-operations--the course also serves as an occasion for introspective analyses, thus helping future researchers to re-think the ways they work and the political motives of their investigations.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARTHIST 421: Art and Visual Culture in Europe: The 1920s and 30s

This seminar focuses attention on European art institutions, exhibitions, journals, and movements, most of which intersected with one another across national borders during the interwar period, including Cubism, De Stijl, Purism, Art Deco, the Bauhaus, and Surrealism. Media include painting, architecture, photography, film, fashion and (graphic) design. We will examine period sources in Stanford library special collections and visit the permanent collection at SFMOMA.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 422: Reception and Literacy in Roman Art (CLASSICS 373)

(Formerly CLASSART 322.) Beyond a focus on artists and patrons: how Roman art was seen and understood by its contemporary viewers. Themes include memory, performance, gender, replication, and constructions of space. Goal is to draft a differentiated model of viewing and literacy, with attention to collective experience, hierarchy, access, and subversion.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARTHIST 423: Living in the Material World: Imagination and Agency (ARTHIST 223)

This seminar deals with the materials that artists have chosen in art and construction from antiquity to the early modern era. The particular focus is upon pre-modern perceptions of the inherent properties of materials, from amber and ivory to marble and granite, as well as the diverse ways in which societies have associated particular substances with social and cultural values. Particular emphasis is laid upon the architectural use of materials.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ARTHIST 423B: Art That Moves: Affect, Kinesis, Mobility, 1300-1700

The early modern artist who imbues his subjects with movement is praised by his critics above all others, for he can do what is impossible: give life to dead matter. Movement is sometimes suggested, a trick of the eye that leads the spectator to anticipate a moment just about to unfold. Other times, the artist is said to conjure a living figure, whose flesh trembles with breath and a beating pulse. This seminar explores these and other examples of movement, instances that negotiate the relationship between depicted and actual movement with the emotion it stirs (affect). We will also study movement¿s relation to narrative and descriptive language (history and ekphrasis), and art¿s ability to move through time (Warburg¿s Pathosformel) and space (artworks and artists that travel). A study of movement uncovers multiple contradictions and possibilities in the history of art.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ARTHIST 424: Architecture as Performance from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (ARTHIST 224)

This seminar examines the nature of architectural representation in the western tradition, from antiquity until the 18th century. It considers the ancient theatre as an icon of representation and the afterlife of the stage building as a model for western architecture, including ephemera. It concludes a distinction between the theatrical and the more recent concept of the theatrical.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 429: Vienna and Hamburg : Readings in the Science of Art History

The place of art history in a university curriculum was established in Europe only during the course of the nineteenth century, and only after demonstrating that its methods are rigorous and that its goals have little to do with subjective connoisseurship or personal taste. The ambition was to develop a properly ¿scientific¿ [wissenschaftlich] practice able to claim legitimacy among the traditional disciplines of university study and research. Two German-speaking centers were critical to this development : the Institute for Austrian Historical Research in Vienna and the Warburg Library for the Science of Culture at the University of Hamburg. The best-known author of the first is Alois Riegl, while the second counts Aby Warburg, Erwin Panofsky, and Ernst Cassirer among its members. Recent books on both centers, and the availability of texts in English by others of each group now make it possible to revisit their debates about ¿scientific¿ art history that shaped the field as we know it today. This seminar will read closely a selection of these texts with the aim of understanding more fully our own intellectual history and its impact upon discussions concerning the place of our discipline within the humanities today.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ARTHIST 430: Cinema and Ideology (FILMSTUD 430)

The relationship between cinema and ideology from theoretical and historical perspectives, emphasizing Marxist and psychoanalytic approaches. The practice of political filmmaking, and the cinema as an audiovisual apparatus and socio-cultural institution. Topics include: dialectics; revolutionary aesthetics; language and power; commodity fetishism; and nationalism. Filmmakers include Dziga Vertov, Jean-Luc Godard, Bruce Conner, and Marco Ferreri. Theoretical writers include Karl Marx, Sergei Eisenstein, and Slavoj Zizek. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Levi, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 430B: Image and Text in Chinese Painting (ARTHIST 230B, CHINA 230, CHINA 430)

An examination of many types of interactions between images and texts in Chinese painting. These include poetic lines inscribed on paintings (as response or as a theme given to the artist to paint), paintings that emulate or transform ancient poetic couplets, or illustrate poetic and literary narratives, and calligraphic inscriptions. Attention will be given both to comparative perspectives and to the special aesthetic and intellectual consequences that the conjunction of the literary and visual modes give to Chinese artistic expression. [Undergraduate enrollment with consent of one of the instructors]
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 20 units total)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints