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211 - 220 of 246 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 314: Epic and Empire (COMPLIT 320A)

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ENGLISH 316: American Story Cycles

A survey of US literature told through the history of an important, complex, and neglected genre, the short story cycle, ranging from Nathaniel Hawthorne¿s incomplete The Story Teller to Jennifer Egan¿s A Visit From the Goon Squad (2011). Other authors include Sarah Orne Jewett, Charles Chesnutt, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer, and Louise Erdrich. An introduction to the patterns of American literary development, its social and cultural contexts, and the major critical/theoretical lenses through which it has been understood. We will consider the unique formal qualities of the story cycle: its liminal status between novel and story collection, its vacillation between unity and multiplicity, connection and disconnection, in relation to broader American questions of identity and community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 318: Pitching and Publishing in Popular Media (DLCL 312, FEMGEN 312F)

Most of the time, writing a pitch for a popular outlet just means writing an email. So why be intimidated? This course will outline the procedure for pitching essays and articles to popular media: how to convince an editor, agent, or anyone else that your idea is compelling, relevant, and deliverable. We'll take a holistic approach to self-presentation that includes presenting yourself with confidence, optimizing your social media and web platform, networking effectively, writing excellent queries and pitches, avoiding the slush pile, and perhaps most importantly, persevering through the inevitable self-doubt and rejection.We will focus on distinguishing the language, topics and hooks of popular media writing from those of academic writing, learn how to target and query editors on shortform pieces (personal essays, news stories, etc.), and explore how humanists can effectively self-advocate and get paid for their work.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Goode, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 318A: Advanced Workshop in Pitching and Publishing for Popular Media (FEMGEN 312G)

Graduate students may self-determine a popular media project¿such as an essay, column/series of essays, podcast, agent query, or book proposal¿to be completed, with consent, under the mentorship of the Graduate Humanities Public Writing Project. Prerequisite: Pitching and Publishing in Popular Media ( DLCL 312/ENG 318/ FEMGEN 312F), approved project proposal. Students will determine their individual meeting schedule with the instructor, and will also convene for at least one group meeting.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1

ENGLISH 319A: The World, The Globe, The Planet

This course will introduce graduate students to several competing concepts of world-circulating literatures and methodologies for studying them. As the title suggests, the course introduces students to more established ideas of "World Literature", concepts around "globalization" and its distinction from the World category, as well as ideas of Planetarity, including ecocritical approaches.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Kantor, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 327: Genres of the Novel (COMPLIT 327, FRENCH 327)

Provides students with an overview of some major genres in the history of the modern novel, along with major theorists in the critical understanding of the form. Novels might include works by Cervantes, Defoe, Lafayette, Radcliffe, Goethe, Scott, Balzac, Melville, and Woolf. Theorists might include Lukacs, Bakhtin, Jameson, Gallagher, Barthes, Kristeva, and Bourdieu. *PLEASE NOTE: Course for graduate students only.*
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Cohen, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (DLCL 333, MUSIC 332, PHIL 333)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeated for credit. This year's installment focuses on songs, lyric poems, and works that lie on the border between them, with special attention to questions of genre and medium, speakers/singers and addressees, mourning and loss, and how we are invoked in these texts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 20 units total)

ENGLISH 334B: Concepts of Modernity II: Culture, Aesthetics, and Society in the Age of Globalization (COMPLIT 334B, MTL 334B)

Emphasis on world-system theory, theories of coloniality and power, and aesthetic modernity/postmodernity in their relation to culture broadly understood.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 350: Law and Literature

After its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s, many wondered whether the law and literature movement would retain vitality. Within the last decade there has, however, been an explosion of energy in the field, which has expanded beyond the boundaries of the literary text narrowly conceived and incorporated a range of other genres and humanistic approaches. Several recent or forthcoming books survey the range of emerging scholarship and the potential for new directions within the field.  Using one of these--New Directions in Law and Literature (Oxford, 2017)--as a guide, this course will delve into a variety of topics that law and literature approaches can illuminate. These include, among others, conceptions of sovereignty and non-sovereign collectivities, the construction of the citizen and refugee, competing visions of marriage and its alternatives, law and the rhetorical tradition, and theoretical perspectives on intellectual property. Nearly every session will pair recent scholarship in th more »
After its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s, many wondered whether the law and literature movement would retain vitality. Within the last decade there has, however, been an explosion of energy in the field, which has expanded beyond the boundaries of the literary text narrowly conceived and incorporated a range of other genres and humanistic approaches. Several recent or forthcoming books survey the range of emerging scholarship and the potential for new directions within the field.  Using one of these--New Directions in Law and Literature (Oxford, 2017)--as a guide, this course will delve into a variety of topics that law and literature approaches can illuminate. These include, among others, conceptions of sovereignty and non-sovereign collectivities, the construction of the citizen and refugee, competing visions of marriage and its alternatives, law and the rhetorical tradition, and theoretical perspectives on intellectual property. Nearly every session will pair recent scholarship in the field with a literary or artistic work, ranging from Claudia Rankine's Citizen to Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 3 or 4 units, depending on the paper length.  This class is limited to 22 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (16 students will be selected by lottery) and six non-law students by consent of instructor.  Elements used in grading:  Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with the Law School ( LAW 3517).
Last offered: Spring 2019

ENGLISH 350A: The Poetic Memory (ENGLISH 150A)

In this course, we'll read an array of contemporary poetry traversing personal and public history. As we generate original poetry and prose unearthing our personal narratives, we'll consider how poetry and memory intersect, what it means to explore your life and the past through the poetic lens, how autobiography works in books of poetry, and what "the truth" means when writing about life experiences.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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