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181 - 190 of 239 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 218: Literature and the Brain (COMPLIT 138, COMPLIT 238, ENGLISH 118, FRENCH 118, FRENCH 218, PSYC 126, PSYCH 118F)

Recent developments in and neuroscience and experimental psychology have transformed the way we think about the operations of the brain. What can we learn from this about the nature and function of literary texts? Can innovative ways of speaking affect ways of thinking? Do creative metaphors draw on embodied cognition? Can fictions strengthen our "theory of mind" capabilities? What role does mental imagery play in the appreciation of descriptions? Does (weak) modularity help explain the mechanism and purpose of self-reflexivity? Can the distinctions among types of memory shed light on what narrative works have to offer?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ENGLISH 222: Jane Austen and Virginia Woolf

Last offered: Spring 2020

ENGLISH 224: Doing Literary History: Orwell in the World (HISTORY 200K)

This course will bring together the disciplines of history and literary studies by looking closely at the work of one major twentieth-century author: the British writer and political polemicist George Orwell. In 1946, Orwell writes, "What I have most wanted to do throughout the past ten years is to make political writing into an art." In these years, Orwell writes about-- and often participates in or witnesses first-hand--a series of major events and crises. These include British imperialism in Burma, urban poverty in Europe, class inequality in England, the conflict between Socialism and Fascism in Spain, and the rise of totalitarianism in the Soviet Union. In engaging all of these events, Orwell experiments with different literary forms, moving between fiction and non-fiction, novel and autobiography, essay and memoir, manifesto and fable, literature and journalism. Few writers demand such sustained and equal attention to text and context: in this course we will move back-and-forth between Orwell's varied writing and the urgent social and political contexts it addresses.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

ENGLISH 224B: Nature, Race, and Indigeneity in the U.S. Imagination (AMSTUD 224)

Nature is one of the weirdest words in the English language¿it can refer to human trait (it is in her nature), a nonhuman environment (we walked in nature, a divine power (mother nature), or a biological process (¿nature calls¿). Despite¿and indeed, because of¿these ambiguities, nature has played pivotal roles in the territory that has come to be known as the United States. In various guises, nature has inspired pilgrims, pioneers, and tourists. At the same time, nature has staged struggles between settlers and Natives, whites and racialized peoples, upper classes and working classes. As both a cultural construct and a material reality, therefore, nature has brought us together and torn us apart. In this seminar, we will learn how Natives, Latinxs, Blacks, whites, and other ethno-racial groups have depicted and dwelled in the U.S. By engaging with a variety of media¿from literature and visual art to law and public policy¿we will recover conflicting ideas of nature. And by reading in th more »
Nature is one of the weirdest words in the English language¿it can refer to human trait (it is in her nature), a nonhuman environment (we walked in nature, a divine power (mother nature), or a biological process (¿nature calls¿). Despite¿and indeed, because of¿these ambiguities, nature has played pivotal roles in the territory that has come to be known as the United States. In various guises, nature has inspired pilgrims, pioneers, and tourists. At the same time, nature has staged struggles between settlers and Natives, whites and racialized peoples, upper classes and working classes. As both a cultural construct and a material reality, therefore, nature has brought us together and torn us apart. In this seminar, we will learn how Natives, Latinxs, Blacks, whites, and other ethno-racial groups have depicted and dwelled in the U.S. By engaging with a variety of media¿from literature and visual art to law and public policy¿we will recover conflicting ideas of nature. And by reading in the environmental humanities¿including history, anthropology, and literary criticism¿we will discover how these ideas have impacted human and more-than-human worlds. While our inquiries will take us from prehistory to the present, they will converge on the future; now that we are destroying our ecosystems, extinguishing our fellow species, and transforming our atmosphere, we will ask, is there still such a thing as nature?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Nugent, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 225: Postcolonial Tragedy

This course will survey debates on literary tragedy from a postcolonial perspective. Theories of tragedy from Aristotle, Martha Nussbaum, Judith Butler, the German Idealists and various others will be explored for viewpoints on tragedy that will in their turn be tested against a number of literary texts from the postcolonial literary tradition. Works by the Greeks, Shakespeare, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Toni Morrison, Jean Rhys, Arundhati Roy, and Tayeb Salih will be explored for a working definition of postcolonial tragedy.nPlease note that knowledge of Shakespearean tragedy will be taken for granted in this class If you are not already acquainted with Shakespeare you are encouraged to familiarise yourself with Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, and Othello before taking the class. Frequent references will be made in class to these and other plays. Familiarity with Greek tragedy will also be useful during the first weeks of the course. Attention will be paid especially to Sophocles' Oedipus Rex and Philoctetes, Aeschylus's Oresteia, and Euripides's Medea.Any kind of familiarity with the Greeks is better than none at all, so please be sure to be at the very least acquainted with their central characters and plotlines.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Quayson, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 237: Before Novels

What is at stake when we identify ancient, medieval, or early modern works as proto-novelistic, especially when such texts encompass the wondrous, the mystical, the factual, and/or didactic? What do the ¿prosaic¿ dimensions of prose fiction disclose about our conceptions or history, truth, or reality? Readings for this course may include (in English translation where applicable) Lucian, A True History; Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe; Cervantes, Don Quixote; Nashe, The Unfortunate Traveller; Hooke, Micrographia; Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year; Austen, Persuasion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Yu, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 251: Paradise Lost for Beginners

A reading class for those studying Paradise Lost in its entirety for the first time. A close reading of this very long poem, plus study of pertinent Miltonic prose, as well as historical background and classic interpretive essays.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ENGLISH 251B: Paradise Lost

A reading class for those studying Paradise Lost in its entirety for the first time. A close reading of this very long poem, plus study of pertinent Miltonic prose, as well as historical background and classic interpretive essays.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Yu, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 253A: Historical Manuscript in Digital Contexts

How can Digital Humanities technologies help explore the contexts of historical texts? How can the physical make-up of a source be coded and represented? What does a text's spatial dimension tell us? This class will use three DH technologies to explore the different contexts of medieval texts, TEI (Text Encoding Initiative), GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and IIIF (International Image Interoperability Framework). We will examine these through the multilingual tradition of the romance Floris and Blancheflour, as well as the study of online materials in Stanford's Special Collections.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Backman, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 284H: What is Text?

Words and images, sounds and symbols are transformed into meaning through different media, but how are we to understand the complexity of the messages we encounter daily? We shall explore the ways in which we decipher TEXT through different media (film, book), materials (paper, capacitive touchscreen), tools (pen, recorder, camera), and environment (cinema, bedroom, coffeeshop), and reflect on how we create texts by adaptation into different forms. Students will design their own new versions of well-known texts in this course.
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