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141 - 150 of 246 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 184C: Data and Knowledge in the Humanities

How do different disciplines understand and use data, and how do skills such as interpretation and critical thought work with data to create knowledge? The introduction of mathematics reshaped disciplines like cosmology and sociology in the past while, in the present, the humanities are facing the same challenges with the emergence of fields such as spatial history and the digital humanities. In this class we will study how the introduction of data has transformed the way that we create knowledge.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ENGLISH 184E: Literary Text Mining

This course will train students in applied methods for computationally analyzing texts for humanities research. The skills students will gain will include basic programming for textual analysis, applied statistical evaluation of results and the ability to present these results within a formal research paper or presentation. Students in the course will also learn the prerequisite steps of such an analysis including corpus selection and cleaning, metadata collection, and selecting and creating an appropriate visualization for the results.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Warner, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 185D: Ulysses and Difficulty

James Joyce's Ulysses is widely hailed as a masterpiece of world literature¿¿the most important expression which the present age has found,¿ as T. S. Eliot put it¿yet it is perhaps equally famous for its endless capacity to defeat and frustrate its readers. This course, which is built around a careful reading of Ulysses in its entirety, will tackle the problem of the novel's difficulty head-on. What specific features constitute its difficulty, and what ends do they serve? How do the novel's different modes of difficulty affect how we read and interpret it? And what is at stake, politically and ideologically, in the novel¿s refusal to be easily ¿readable¿? In addition to the primary text, we will devote critical attention to its various reading apparatuses (schemas, annotations, online summaries), along with secondary readings that foreground its interpretive challenges. In the process, we will seek to develop a more refined vocabulary for talking about difficult texts, while also thinking more broadly about the role of difficulty in modernist aesthetics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

ENGLISH 186B: The American Underground: Crime and the Criminal in American Literature

The literary representation of crime and the criminal from postrevolutionary through contemporary American literature. Topics will include the enigma of the criminal personality; varieties of crime, from those underwritten by religious or ethical principle to those produced by the deformations of bias; the impact on narrative form of the challenge of narrating crime; and the significance attributed to gratuitous crime in the American cultural context.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ENGLISH 187C: The Evolution of the Feminist First-Person Essay, 2000-present (FEMGEN 187C)

The internet age has coincided with the rise of new and reinvented modes of nonfiction writing by women online. The feminist first-person essay (what simply goes by ¿personal essay¿ in the business) has transformed internet writing formally, politically, and economically. The explosion innpopularity and shareability of this nonfiction subgenre has generated a host of new media and catapulted a new coterie of women writers into prominence. Which authors have exerted the most influence upon this new subgenre, how does the emergence of the first-person essay by women signify a mainstreaming of feminist dialectic, and how has this emergence been received by both a popular readership and the media establishment?nThis discussion-based course will investigate how the growth of the feminist first-person essay has promoted new publications and modes of publication. It will trace the genesis of the online personal essay genre from public journals like LiveJournal, Blogspot, and Tumblr, via its c more »
The internet age has coincided with the rise of new and reinvented modes of nonfiction writing by women online. The feminist first-person essay (what simply goes by ¿personal essay¿ in the business) has transformed internet writing formally, politically, and economically. The explosion innpopularity and shareability of this nonfiction subgenre has generated a host of new media and catapulted a new coterie of women writers into prominence. Which authors have exerted the most influence upon this new subgenre, how does the emergence of the first-person essay by women signify a mainstreaming of feminist dialectic, and how has this emergence been received by both a popular readership and the media establishment?nThis discussion-based course will investigate how the growth of the feminist first-person essay has promoted new publications and modes of publication. It will trace the genesis of the online personal essay genre from public journals like LiveJournal, Blogspot, and Tumblr, via its codification in online publications like The Toast, The Rumpus, Gawker, Jezebel, Guernica, The Hairpin, The Awl, and xoJane, to its eventual breakthrough into established newspapers, magazines, and traditionally published memoirs and essay collections.nWe will investigate questions like: How can the rendering of one individual's story benefit the political mandate of the collective? What is the first person¿s effect, and affect, in interspersing an author¿s personal experience, and what feminist potential does it contain? How does the myth of journalistic ¿objectivity¿ conflict with the presentation of the first person, and how has this objectivity myth descended from patriarchal tropes of legitimation? What do the terms ¿confessional¿ and ¿silence-breaking¿ connote? How has social media simultaneously empowered these new modes of public feminist dialogue and also exposed feminist public intellectuals to alarming levels of harassment and abuse? How successfully has the personal essay subgenre acted in de-centering hegemonic identity structures including whiteness, class privilege, and heterosexuality? What role has the feminist first-person essay played in the emergence of heavily digitized political movements including Black Lives Matter and #MeToo? What is ¿trauma porn¿, and how does it interface with the capitalistic structures of the first-person essay economy; what problems arise when capitalism and confessionalism intersect?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Goode, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

Intermediate course in the craft and art of fiction writing. Students read a diverse range of short stories and novel excerpts, complete writing exercises, and submit a short and longer story to be workshopped and revised. Prerequisite: 90 or 91. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 190D: Dialogue Writing

Study how dialogue develops character, reveals information, moves plots forward, and creates tension. Use of short story, novels, graphic novels, and films. Students will write many short assignments, one dialogue scene, and one longer story or script (10-20pages). Prerequisite: 90.nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 190E: Novel Writing Intensive

The main requirement for this course is a 50,000 word novel. The course explores elements of novel writing including fictional structure, character creation, scene vs. summary, as well as description, narration, and dialogue. Students will read four to five short novels during the first half of the course and then participate in National Novel Writing Month, an international writing event. Students will additionally write synopses, outlines, character sketches, and search tirelessly for the novel's engine: its voice. Designed for any student who has always wanted to write a novel. Prerequisite: 90 or 91. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 190F: Fiction into Film

Workshop. For screenwriting students. Story craft, structure, and dialogue. Assignments include short scene creation, character development, and a long story. How fictional works are adapted to screenplays, and how each form uses elements of conflict, time, summary, and scene. Prerequisite: 90.nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 190G: The Graphic Novel

Interdisciplinary. Evolution, subject matter, form, conventions, possibilities, and future of the graphic novel genre. Guest lectures. Collaborative creation of a graphic novel by a team of writers, illustrators, and designers. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
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