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121 - 130 of 239 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 158H: Science Meets Literature on the Monterey Peninsula (BIOHOPK 158H, BIOHOPK 258H)

(Graduate students register for 258H.) This course will consider the remarkable nexus of scientific research and literature that developed on the Monterey Peninsula in the first half of the 20th century and how the two areas of creativity influenced each other. The period of focus begins with the 1932 association of John and Carol Steinbeck, Ed Ricketts, and Joseph Campbell, all of whom were highly influenced by the Carmel poet, Robinson Jeffers ¿ and ends with the novels Cannery Row (1945) and Sweet Thursday (1954). An indisputable high-tide mark, Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely of Travel and Research (1941) will be considered in detail. Weekend field trips will include intertidal exploration, a tour of the Jeffers Tor House in Carmel, and whale watching on Monterey Bay.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 159: James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature (AFRICAAM 159, FEMGEN 159)

Black, gay and gifted, Baldwin was hailed as a "spokesman for the race", although he personally, and controversially, eschewed titles and classifications of all kinds. This course examines his classic novels and essays as well his exciting work across many lesser-examined domains - poetry, music, theatre, sermon, photo-text, children's literature, public media, comedy and artistic collaboration. Placing his work in context with other writers of the 20C (Faulkner, Wright,Morrison) and capitalizing on a resurgence of interest in the writer (NYC just dedicated a year of celebration of Baldwin and there are 2 new journals dedicated to study of Baldwin), the course seeks to capture the power and influence of Baldwin's work during the Civil Rights era as well as his relevance in the "post-race" transnational 21st century, when his prescient questioning of the boundaries of race, sex, love, leadership and country assume new urgency.nNOTE: Enrollment by department consent. To apply, please email Prof. Elam (melam@stanford.edu) with your name, year, major, and one sentence about why you would like to take this class.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Elam, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.nEnglish majors must take this class for 5 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory (COMPLIT 161E)

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative. nEnglish majors must take this class for 5 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 163F: Shakespeare Now and Then

In this Introduction to Shakespeare on film, we will study approximately five Shakespearean plays, including Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing, and Macbeth, alongside a selection of their movie adaptations. As well as getting to grips with the plays printed texts, we will investigate how the plays meanings and significations can change radically in performance.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 165: Perspectives on American Identity (AMSTUD 160)

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kessler, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 168A: Imagining the Oceans

How has Western culture constructed the world's oceans since the beginning of global ocean exploration? How have imaginative visions of the ocean been shaped by marine science, technology, exploration, commerce and leisure? Primary authors read might include Cook, Equiano, Ricketts, and Steinbeck; Defoe, Cooper, Melville, Conrad, Woolf, Hemingway and Ghosh; Coleridge, Baudelaire, Moore, Bishop and Walcott. Critical readings include Schmitt, Rediker and Linebaugh, Baucom, Best, Corbin, Auden, Sontag and Heller-Roazen. Possible field trips include the Cantor Arts Center and Hopkins Marine Station.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Cohen, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 169B: Asian-American Literature and Criticism (ASNAMST 168B)

This course provides a broad overview of twentieth and twenty-first century Asian-American fiction and memoirs as well as the major critical frameworks that have arisen since the emergence of the Asian-American studies as a formal discipline in the 1960s. We'll begin by reading early works such as the Filipino-American writer Carlos Bulosan's 1947 novel America is in the Heart within the context of Cold War America and end with an examination of post-9/11 Asian-American literature, including Ruth Ozeki's A Tale for the Time Being and Qais Akbar Omar's A Fort of Nine Towers. By comparing the experiences of writers from East, Southeast, and Central Asia, we'll aim to arrive at a nuanced understanding of how imperialism, war, immigration, and legal battles have shaped the experiences of Asian-Americans. In addition to our weekly discussions, this seminar will also feature intensive writing tutorials designed to challenge students to produce a work of original scholarship.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Wang, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 169C: Asian American Film and Popular Culture (AMSTUD 115, ASNAMST 115, COMPLIT 159)

Tracing the evolution of Asian American cultural representations from the silent film era through the first generation of Asian American YouTube stars, this course examines the economic, political, and cultural influence of Asian American screen images on U.S. society. Through a focus on both mainstream and independent productions, we discuss the work of Asian American actors, audience members, media producers, consumers, and activists. Possible films and TV shows to be discussed include The Cheat (1915), Shanghai Express (1932), Flower Drum Song (1961), Chan is Missing (1983) Who Killed Vincent Chin? (1989), Sa-I-Gu, (1992), aka Don Bonus (1995), Saving Face (2004), Crazy Rich Asians (2018) TV episodes of the Mindy Project, and work by early Asian American YouTube stars including Michelle Phan, HappySlip, and KevJumba. nn nnStudents will be accepted to the course by application. Please fill out the google form to apply: https://bit.ly/37Cb00d
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 169D: Contemporary Asian American Stories (ASNAMST 169D)

This course will examine the aesthetics and politics of contemporary Asian American storytellers, with an emphasis on work produced within the past five years. We will investigate the pressures historically placed on Asian Americans to tell a certain kind of story¿e.g. the immigrant story in a realist mode¿and the ways writers have found to surprise, question, and innovate, moving beyond those boundaries to explore issues of race, sexuality, science, memory, citizenship, and belonging. Course materials will consist of novels, short stories, graphic narrative, and film, and may include work by Ocean Vuong, Mira Jacobs, Gish Jen, Charles Yu, and Adrian Tomine, as well as Lulu Wang¿s 2019 film The Farewell. This seminar will feature both analytical and creative components, and students will be encouraged to produce both kinds of responses to the material.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Tanaka, S. (PI)
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