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201 - 210 of 563 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 208K: Global Capitalism and the Global South

Is modern capitalism a European innovation or a global phenomenon? Can there be different manifestations of capitalism in different local, regional, national, and imperial contexts? What role has the Global South played in the history of capitalism? This course examines the ways that capitalism has innovated, destroyed, and matured from the 17th to 20th centuries. It explores the themes of business, trade, labor, agriculture, gender, and race with a focus on the Middle East, Africa, and East and South Asia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Alff, K. (PI)

HISTORY 208S: Facing the Past: The Politics of Retrospective Justice

Forms of injustice in history including slavery, genocide, ethnic cleansing, mass rape, forced religious conversion, and torture of prisoners. Mechanisms developed over the last century to define, deter, and alleviate the effects of such offenses, including war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, national apologies, and monetary reparations. Case studies chart the international field of retrospective justice, exploring the legal, political, and moral implications of confronting traumatic pasts.
Last offered: Autumn 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 209B: The Idea of Politics (HISTORY 309B)

Can we live without politics? Is politics indispensable for humanity and vice-versa? The idea of politics is that it must transform, through human action, conditions of collective life. But the 20th century produced colliding beliefs about what that life might be and what the human being itself might look like. Explore whether, after the century, we might still think of politics as an ethical idea and the "human" as foundational political category. Keywords: Civility, Cruelty, Friendship, Empire, Democracy, Humanism, Animals.

HISTORY 209C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 309C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 209D: Postcolonialism and Universalism (HISTORY 309A)

Key texts and motifs from postcolonial theory: empire, class, exile, suffering, textuality, archive in juxtaposition to 20th-century philosophical questions about universal history and the relevance of humanist inquiry.
Last offered: Winter 2011

HISTORY 209F: Maps in the Early Modern World (HISTORY 309F)

The significance of cartographic enterprise across the early modern world. Political, economic, and epistemological imperatives that drove the proliferation of nautical charts, domain surveys, city plans, atlases, and globes; the types of work such artifacts performed for their patrons, viewers, and subjects. Contributions of indigenous knowledge to imperial maps; the career of the map in commerce, surveillance, diplomacy, conquest, and indoctrination. Sources include recent research from Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on gender, race, sexuality and History of Science; Winter quarter on early modern travel and Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on American political history and open topic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

HISTORY 216: Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century (ARTHIST 206H, FEMGEN 216, HISTORY 316)

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 217S: Minorities In Medieval Europe (RELIGST 217X)

This course examines attitudes towards outsider groups within medieval society and the treatment of these groups by medieval Christians. Heretics, Jews, Muslims, homosexuals, prostitutes and usurers occupied ambivalent and at time dangerous positions within a society that increasingly defined itself as Christian. Differences in the treatment of these various 'outcast' groups, their depiction in art, their legal segregation, and their presumed association with demonic activity are addressed through discussion, and readings from primary and secondary source material.
Last offered: Spring 2015

HISTORY 218: The Holy Dead: Saints and Spiritual Power in Medieval Europe (HISTORY 318, RELIGST 218X, RELIGST 318X)

Examines the cult of saints in medieval religious thought and life. Topics include martyrs, shrines, pilgrimage, healing, relics, and saints' legends.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
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