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211 - 220 of 356 results for: all courses

LINGUIST 120: Introduction to Syntax

Grammatical constructions, primarily English, and their consequences for a general theory of language. Practical experience in forming and testing linguistic hypotheses, reading, and constructing rules.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 130A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 230A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include logical semantics, conversational implicature, presupposition, and speech acts. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as  PHIL 150  or 151, should attend section. Prerequisites: LINGUIST 1, SYMSYS 1 ( LINGUIST 35), consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 130B: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. We explore grammatical regularities in word meaning and the relation between word meaning and the conceptual realm. The questions we address include the following. How is the meaning of a word determined from its internal structure?  How can simple words have complex meanings?  What is a possible word?  How does a word's meaning determine the word's syntactic distribution and what kind of reasoning does it support? What kind of information belongs to the lexical entry of a word?  The course will show that the investigation of the linguistic and semantic structure of words draws on the full resources of linguistic theory and methodology. Prerequisites:  Symsys 1, Linguist 35, or equivalent or permission of the instructor.  Linguist 130A is not a prerequisite for this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 140: Learning to Speak: An Introduction to Child Language Acquisition

None of us were born talking. We all had to learn it. How did we do that? We start the journey by looking at the perception of sounds before birth. We follow infants as they discover the sounds of their native languages. We talk about how the infant mind breaks the speech stream into words, phrases, and sentences; how it makes sense of language and uses it to convey thoughts and feelings. We finish by discussing how the majority of children in the world learn two or more languages at once. The course content will introduce you to major topics in child language acquisition. Assignments will help you develop skills in collecting, analyzing, and reporting empirical data. The class project involves collecting data from children at the Bing Nursery school on campus as well as the analysis of a large dataset of children's speech online. Class discussion and projects focus on giving you a hands-on experience with critical and scientific thinking.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 142: Heritage Languages (LINGUIST 242)

The linguistic and cultural properties of Heritage languages, which are partially acquired and supplanted by a dominant language in childhood. Topics: Syntactic, phonological and morphological properties of heritage languages, implications from experimental HL research for language universals, cultural vs. linguistic knowledge, the role of schooling in HL competence, influence of the dominant language on the HL, and pedagogical issues for HL learners in the classroom.
Last offered: Spring 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 150: Language and Society

This course explores the social life of spoken language. Students learn to address the following big questions about language and society: Why do languages vary across different time periods, locations, and social groups? What do our opinions about the way other people speak tell us about society? How do our social identities and goals influence the way we speak? And how do we use language to alter our social relationships? In addition to weekly reading responses, students complete two projects during the quarter: a transcription of spoken interaction and a quantitative analysis of linguistic variation. Students taking the course for four units write a literature review and project proposal for their final papers. Students taking the course for three units complete a shorter final paper that aims to improve public awareness about sociolinguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 156: Language, Gender, & Sexuality (FEMGEN 156X)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 160: Introduction to Language Change

Principles of historical linguistics:, the nature of language change. Kinds and causes of change, variation and diffusion of changes through populations, differentiation of dialects and languages, determination and classification of historical relationships among languages, the reconstruction of ancestral languages and intermediate changes, parallels with cultural and genetic evolutionary theory, and implications of variation and change for the description and explanation of language in general. Prerequisite: introductory course in linguistics.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 167: Languages of the World

The diversity of human languages, their sound systems, vocabularies, and grammars. Tracing historical relationships between languages and language families. Parallels with genetic evolutionary theory. Language policy, endangered languages and heritage languages. Classification of sign languages.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

MATSCI 159Q: Japanese Companies and Japanese Society (ENGR 159Q)

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Sinclair, R. (PI)
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