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71 - 80 of 294 results for: all courses

BIOHOPK 183H: Introduction to Ecology (BIOHOPK 81)

The course is designed to provide background on key concepts in ecology, familiarize students with key ecological processes and ecosystems, and the methods used in ecological studies. The course will further build students' skills in critical scientific thinking, reading the literature, and scientific communication. A major goal of the course is to train students to ask questions in ecology, and to design, conduct and report studies addressing these questions. Thus, emphasis is also placed, in additional to general ecological concepts, on field observations, experimental design, and the analysis, interpretation and presentation of ecological data (through computer laboratories, written assignments and presentations). Written assignments, presentations and discussions are designed to provide experience in organizing and presenting information and to expose students to multiple perspectives on ecological processes and their applications.nThis course fulfills the same requirement as BIO 81.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 185H: Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 285H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on scientific diving and quantitative ecological methods in kelp forests.. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes, and subtidal field techniques. Class projects contribute to long-term monitoring at Hopkins Marine Station. It is recommended (but not required) that students complete the Stanford Scientific Diver Training session, typically offered prior to the start of the course. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; rescue scuba certification and scuba equipment.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 187H: Sensory Ecology (BIOHOPK 287H)

(Graduate students register for 287H.) Topics: the ways animals receive, filter, and process information gleaned from the environment, sensory receptor mechanisms, neural processing, specialization to life underwater, communication within and between species, importance of behavior to ecosystem structure and dynamics, impact of acoustic and light pollution on marine animals. Emphasis is on the current scientific literature. The laboratory portion of the class explores sensory mechanisms using neurobiological methods and methods of experimental animal behavior.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

CEE 6: Physics of Cities (URBANST 109)

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

CEE 63: Weather and Storms (CEE 263C)

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CEE 73: Water: An Introduction

Lake Tahoe's waters are so clear you can follow a diver 70 feet below your boat. A Lake Erie summer often means that nearshore waters have a green surface scum obscuring everything below. California, suffering from drought, is seriously considering reclamation and direct potable reuse of sewage -- aka toilet to tap. Can we (or should we) do this? Why is Tahoe clear, Erie green? This class introduces students to the fundamental tools and science used to understand and manage both natural and human-engineered water systems. Each student will use these tools to explore a water topic of their choosing.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/M.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 177: Aquatic Chemistry and Biology

Introduction to chemical and biological processes in the aqueous environment. Basic aqueous equilibria; the structure, behavior, and fate of major classes of chemicals that dissolve in water; redox reactions; the biochemistry of aquatic microbial life; and biogeochemical processes that govern the fate of nutrients and metals in the environment and in engineered systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Criddle, C. (PI)

CEE 178: Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis (CEE 276)

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
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