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221 - 230 of 243 results for: SOC

SOC 372: Theoretical Analysis and Research Design

Restricted to Sociology Doctoral students only and required for Ph.D. in Sociology. This seminar is designed to deepen students¿ understanding of the epistemological foundations of social science, the construction and analysis of theories, and the design of empirical research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)

SOC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 7071), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit (up to 297 units total)

SOC 375W: Workshop: Politics, Morality, and Hierarchy

Advanced research workshop with a focus on new theory and research, recent publications, and current research by faculty and graduate student participants. Topics of relevant research include, but are not restricted to, morality, cooperation, solidarity, politics, status, and power. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 376: Ethnographic and Fieldwork Methods

This is a quarter-long graduate level seminar and practicum in ethnographic fieldwork methods, providing students with hands-on training in the epistemology, theory, methods, and politics of ethnography. Through weekly readings, assignments, and exercises applied to a field site of their choosing, students will learn the dynamics of gaining access, building rapport, writing field notes, coding, crafting analytic memos, and writing up findings. Class sessions will be spent discussing readings, debriefing research experiences, and analyzing fellow students' field notes. Students should plan to spend at least five hours per week in their chosen field site. Enrollment priority will be given to graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Stuart, F. (PI)

SOC 376A: Ethnographic and Fieldwork Methods

This is an intensive graduate level seminar in ethnographic and fieldwork methods. Students will receive hands-on training in the epistemology, theory, methods, and politics of fieldwork. This begins by learning how to critically engage ethnographic and qualitative books and articles. Next, students will become acquainted with field research techniques and issues through a number of class exercises. Students will learn the dynamics of gaining access, building rapport, writing field notes, crafting memos, and executing various modes of analyses. Finally, students will begin conducting their own fieldwork research in a field site of their choosing. Students should plan to spend at least five hours per week in the field, write and submit formal field notes, and craft a final paper that analyzes their fieldwork data. Class session will be divided in two parts. First, students will discuss the readings and topics of the week. The remainder of the class will be devoted to discussing research experiences and/or analyzing fellow students' field notes. Students should anticipate producing an article or chapter length research paper by the end the class. Priority given to Graduate students.nPriority given to Graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020

SOC 376B: Ethnographic and Fieldwork Methods

This graduate level seminar is the first of an intensive two-quarter-long course in ethnographic and fieldwork methods. Students will receive hands-on training in the epistemology, theory, methods, and politics of fieldwork. This begins by learning how to critically engage ethnographic and qualitative books and articles. Next, students will become acquainted with field research techniques and issues through a number of class exercises. Students will learn the dynamics of gaining access, building rapport, writing field notes, crafting memos, and executing various modes of analyses. Finally, students will begin conducting their own fieldwork research in a field site of their choosing. Students should plan to spend at least five hours per week in the field, write and submit formal field notes, and craft a final paper that analyzes their fieldwork data. Class session will be divided in two parts. First, students will discuss the readings and topics of the week. The remainder of the class will be devoted to discussing research experiences and/or analyzing fellow students¿ field notes. Students should anticipate producing an article or chapter length research paper by the end of the second quarter of the class.nnPriority given to Graduate students¿
Last offered: Spring 2020

SOC 378: Seminar on Institutional Theory and World Society

Sociological analyses of the rise and impact of the expanded modern world order, with its internationalized organizations and globalized discourse. Consequences for national and local society: education, political organization, economic structure, the environment, and science. The centrality of the individual and the rationalized organization as legitimated actors.
Last offered: Spring 2021

SOC 379: Methods for Network Analysis

In this course, we learn how to collect and analyze social network data. We begin by learning the fundamentals of graph theory and replicating well-known network studies. In the process, we cover classic network methods from centrality to block-modeling. We then move to the frontiers of network analysis. Topics include visualization, modeling and simulation, dynamic network analysis, network experiments, semantic network analysis, and analyzing social networks at scale. Sources and ways of collecting network data will be discussed and students will apply methods they learn to data of their own.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Hoffman, M. (PI)

SOC 380W: Workshop: Qualitative and Fieldwork Methods

Presentations and discussion of ongoing ethnographic, interview-based, and other fieldwork research by faculty and students . May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

SOC 381: Sociological Methodology I: Introduction

Enrollment limited to first-year Sociology doctoral students. Other students by instructor permission only. n This course provides a conceptual and applied introduction to quantitative social sciences methodology, including measurement, sampling and descriptive statistics, statistical inference, ANOVA, factor analysis, and ordinary least squares regression. Students will be introduced to both the methodological logic and techniques of statistical data analysis. The course will present the purpose, goals, and mathematical assumptions behind techniques of statistical analysis and will discuss applications to analyzing data and interpreting results. In addition to the lecture time, SOC381 includes a weekly lab section to learn statistical software and conduct applied research.n*Students enrolling in Soc381 are strongly encouraged to take a 1-week Math/Statistics refresher course from September 16 to September 20. Please contact the instructor at torche@stanford.edu for details
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
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